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homemade peameal bacon

 
MAY 26 @ 05:00

by Ashen

This is my second attempt at this. The first was very good, but I didn't remember to take pictures.

Unlike regular bacon(streaky) this is not made from the belly but from a piece of center cut pork loin.
the loin is brined for 4 or 5 days then rolled in peameal or coarse ground corn meal.


The only difference between the versions is that the first time I rolled it in actual peameal.(dried yellow peas ground coarsely) and this time I used a coarse ground cornmeal.
Traditionally peameal was used a long time ago, but at least in my lifetime it has always been cornmeal and turns out that is what my  wife and I prefer.

I will have to do this again but instead of rolling in meal ; smoke with some maple wood and make backbacon instead.  ( what Americans would call canadian bacon, although the "Canadian Bacon" you get in the US bears about the same resemblance to proper Backbacon , as the green kraft Can of parmesian does to proper parmigiano reggiano)

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MAY 26 @ 19:22

by minerva

Smoked/Unsmoked Back is as common here as Streaky.
Time was when you could also by Middle as a cut too, but that seems to have been consigned to history in recent years.
Streaky was only ever used when you either needed the extra fat for frying/flavouring or were too poor to afford a better cut!

This is pig country around here.............& I have often been disappointed when abroad by what is called 'bacon' in foreign climes. I am very lucky to enjoy the quality I find in every butchers locally.

 
MAY 26 @ 20:34

by BritFinn

That looks lovely Ashen thumbsup

 
MAY 26 @ 21:50

by MsPablo

Very interesting.  What happens after the brine and coating with cornmeal?  Does it get cooked or is it naturally preserved and you cook it as you need it?

Fortunately, there are sources these days for all sorts of bacon in the U.S., even quality Canadian bacon, but one has to seek it out.

 
MAY 27 @ 00:07

by Ashen

The brine preserves it, also rolling in the cornmeal dries it out and helps to preserve it.  It will keep in the fridge uncooked for a week after the brining phase but we usually cut it into chunks or slices and freeze it to use later  . I actually still have some of the yellow pea meal  coated stuff in the freezer and will do a side by side taste test at some point.

very true about being able to seek out good things if you want them. My wife and I spent and afternoon driving around trying to find a portuguese grocery store in the town next to us.  It was well worth it though as the butcher counter was amazing and great bread from  their bakery and lots of interesting ethnic products from around the world stock on their shelves.

On the canadian bacon subject . My wife works at a grocery store and not long ago a couple came in with friends who were visiting from the USA. Their friends really wanted to try some "Canadian Bacon" in canada.  They were looking for the round  weirdly smoked flavoured product they knew from the states though, and the most of the store employees had no idea what "Canadian bacon" was besides a very funny movie. lol

 
JUN 07 @ 23:36

by mr spice

I remember seeing bacon joints that looked just like this in an old butchers on the High Street in my old hometown...what was the point? I don't believe either pea or corn meal would enhance he flavour. Is it use to draw more moisture from the meat? Keep the flys off? Please advise...big_smile

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