Jamie Oliver

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#1 Mon 05 Feb 07 6:21am

quiggers

Member
Occupation Air Charter Broker
From Cairns Australia
Member since Mon 05 Feb 07

Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Hey guys, i am a pom lilving in Cairns.

this is a great recipe for Tandoori Chicken Wraps done on the Barbie.

Chicken Breast or Thigh (as much as you need for each person) 1 breast per person is about right cubed.

Tomatoes (5) diced

1 Large Onion Chopped well but not too fine.

Tandoori (curry Paste) I find Pataks is best or you can make your own up. about half a Jar. Pataks have very mild (korma) right thru to Vindaloo so you choose how hot you want it.

1 Large tub of thickened cream.

mix all ingredients in large mixing bowl until fully blended.

put all onto pre-heated oiled (olive) barbie and cook till quite dry (about 1/2 hou)

Servie with salad in Chapati Wraps and cold beer. love it!

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#2 Mon 05 Feb 07 11:08am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

What you describe is akin to that classic English dish - Chicken Tikka Massala smile

But its nothing like a Tandoori!

There are three defining characteristics of tandoori cooking.

THE MEAT
This is always cooked whole, on the bone.
Chicken legs, thighs, drumsticks, quarters, halves or whole poussin.
Whole quail or small game birds.
Whole large raw prawns.
Whole small fish, or steaks of larger fish.

If the meat is cubed or boneless, this is tikka, not tandoori.

If the meat is minced and formed round a skewer, these are kebabs. (kebabs are not marinaded}

THE MARINADE
Is always made with yoghurt, never with cream. The yoghurt is there to tenderize and protect the meat. The length of marinading depends on the meat - prawns for 30-90 mins, chicken for at least 8-12 hours, red meat at least 24 hours.

The yoghurt is mixed with a tandoori massala or a tandoori paste, which you can buy, or make yourself. (Pataks do a good one, as do Lazeeza - but if you make your own, so much the better).

Try to avoid the virulently red coloured pastes sometimes sold - the artificial red colour is not authentic.

Lemon juice is essential in the marinade to give it a sour "edge" - alternatively (and more authentically), manchoor (dried green mango powder) or tamarind paste is used.

THE METHOD
Tandooris are cooked in a tandoor!
A tandoor is a vertical oven, charcoal fired, shaped somewhat like an "Ali Baba" pot, and highly insulated. This produces a very high heat - up to 400C - which produces very rapid cooking, and the food is baked rather than grilled.

Meat is mounted on long skewers, and inserted in the top of the tandoor. Cooking is brief - think microwave speed! The meat should look slightly charred on the outside, but succulent within (too many people cook "tandoori" for so long that its dry and stringy sad )

If you don't have a tandoor (I do, but most people don't) then you can get a similar effect by turning your oven up to its maximum, or by cooking indirectly in a kettle or other closed barbecue, again heated to the highest possible temperature,

Usually served as a "starter", with a little salad, raita and pickles, accompanied by naan rather than chappati.

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#3 Tue 06 Feb 07 12:20am

quiggers

Member
Occupation Air Charter Broker
From Cairns Australia
Member since Mon 05 Feb 07

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Hey Geoff,

my apologies for the misnomer,

simply an idea for people with a flat surface on their Barbie, which most people do have as opposed to your tandoor. this recipe is quick easy and tasty.

i normally also throw in some lime leaves and juice which i grow in my garden along with some fresh coriander also home grown.

call it what you will. it is great and best served with salad and Chapati wraps.

i find cream works best as it tends not to seperate the way yogurt can.

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#4 Tue 06 Feb 07 3:14am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Hiya quiggers

Didn't mean any critiscism - and I agree your recipe works well.

Just thought I would take opportunity to correct a few misconceptions people have about what a tandoori is - and what it isn't.

You mentioned yoghurt splitting? This will inevably happen if you use low-fat yoghurt, and also if you don't allow the meat to marinade, bt attempt to use it immediately.

Use full fat, preferably set, "live" yoghurt, and marinade the meat for as long as possible - and don't omit the lemon juice from the marinade. The acid in the yoghurt and lemon juice tenderizes the meat. The lemon juice, and the finely ground spices, with the meat juices, stabilize the yoghurt and stops it splitting.

Cream is used in some Indian cookery, but always in sauces rather than marinades.

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#5 Wed 07 Feb 07 4:23am

quiggers

Member
Occupation Air Charter Broker
From Cairns Australia
Member since Mon 05 Feb 07

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Hey Geoff,

none taken.

always happy to talk to Indian Food Buffs. Starved of it in Oz and therefore like to make my our at home. the barbie option is a really good one for casual dining as opposed to a sit down curry.

Have used live yogurt in the past but still find cream gives better taste. all subjective i suppose.

Grow lots of own herbs and spices in the garden with a flourishing Curry Leaf tree and coriander grows practically wild in the conditions here (tropical).

My wife is from Sheffield so also used to good Curry and Balti Houses of which there are none to speak of in Cairns.

being in the Tropics allows use of fragrant spices and fruits to create fantastic chutneys to go with it all.

love to cook anything really although favourites are Indian and Italian.

Quiggers

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#6 Wed 07 Feb 07 1:38pm

Anna

Forum champ
From Switzerland
Member since Fri 15 Apr 05

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Nothing to do with the recipe, just wanted to say that I'm a little bit jealous that you're living in Cairns.  My parents (my mum's from Sydney) bought an apartment in Palm Cove a few years ago but sold it on recently.  It was such a lovely place, even though it's all tourist-purpose-built.  I'd cope with a lack of curry houses to live in the tropics!   wink

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#7 Fri 07 Nov 08 3:32am

miryam

Member
Member since Tue 28 Oct 08

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

hi guys, I have no doubt your recipes are very good, but pls try mine, is really tasty, and can be done in a barbacue or in the oven:
Ingredients
1 kg chicken pieces or fillets
200g natural yoghurt
1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated finely
1 tbsp garlic, grated finely
1 tbsp tandoori paste
tsp tandoori food colouring (optional)
2 tsp cumin seeds, ground
2 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp garam masala
tsp chilli powder
tsp turmeric powder
Salt to taste
Mint sauce and roti to serve

Mint Sauce
1 bunch mint
1 bunch coriander
2 tbsp dried pomegranate seeds, ground (available at spice shops)
Salt to taste
Chilli to taste
200g natural yoghurt
small onion
1 tomato
1 tsp turmeric

In a bowl mix together yoghurt, salt, chilli, coriander, cumin, garam masala and tandoori paste. Rub mixture into chicken and leave to marinate for at least 2 hours in the fridge.

Pre-heat the oven to its highest setting. Bake chicken for 20 minutes then reduce the oven heat to 120C an cook until tender. Garnish with tomatoes and lettuce.

Mint Sauce
Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth.
Enjoy !!!

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#8 Fri 07 Nov 08 3:53am

TheBeast2

Forum champ
Member since Fri 31 Aug 07

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

GeoffP wrote:

What you describe is akin to that classic English dish - Chicken Tikka Massala smile

But its nothing like a Tandoori!

There are three defining characteristics of tandoori cooking.

THE MEAT
This is always cooked whole, on the bone.
Chicken legs, thighs, drumsticks, quarters, halves or whole poussin.
Whole quail or small game birds.
Whole large raw prawns.
Whole small fish, or steaks of larger fish.

If the meat is cubed or boneless, this is tikka, not tandoori.

If the meat is minced and formed round a skewer, these are kebabs. (kebabs are not marinaded}

THE MARINADE
Is always made with yoghurt, never with cream. The yoghurt is there to tenderize and protect the meat. The length of marinading depends on the meat - prawns for 30-90 mins, chicken for at least 8-12 hours, red meat at least 24 hours.

The yoghurt is mixed with a tandoori massala or a tandoori paste, which you can buy, or make yourself. (Pataks do a good one, as do Lazeeza - but if you make your own, so much the better).

Try to avoid the virulently red coloured pastes sometimes sold - the artificial red colour is not authentic.

Lemon juice is essential in the marinade to give it a sour "edge" - alternatively (and more authentically), manchoor (dried green mango powder) or tamarind paste is used.

THE METHOD
Tandooris are cooked in a tandoor!
A tandoor is a vertical oven, charcoal fired, shaped somewhat like an "Ali Baba" pot, and highly insulated. This produces a very high heat - up to 400C - which produces very rapid cooking, and the food is baked rather than grilled.

Meat is mounted on long skewers, and inserted in the top of the tandoor. Cooking is brief - think microwave speed! The meat should look slightly charred on the outside, but succulent within (too many people cook "tandoori" for so long that its dry and stringy sad )

If you don't have a tandoor (I do, but most people don't) then you can get a similar effect by turning your oven up to its maximum, or by cooking indirectly in a kettle or other closed barbecue, again heated to the highest possible temperature,

Usually served as a "starter", with a little salad, raita and pickles, accompanied by naan rather than chappati.

I feel compelled to point out that a max temp oven is as similar to a tandoor as putting a punnet of strawberries in a bowl of cream in the fridge is similar to making strawberry ice-cream.

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#9 Fri 07 Nov 08 5:13am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Right on Beastie...hahaha!

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#10 Fri 07 Nov 08 10:25am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Cracking Tandoori Chicken wraps

Hi Miryam, thanks for your recipe - looks really good.

Its probably as near a proper Tandoori as can be done without a Tandoor!

I would only suggest a couple of tiny changes, which would enhance the flavour.

First off - don't forget to skin the chicken, and slash deeply a few times - Asian countries do not usually cook with chicken with skin on, and the slashes help the marinade to penetrate the chicken.

Tandoori food colouring is definitely inauthentic.

A good squeeze of lemon, or a teaspoon of Manchoor (dried mango powder), or a teaspoon of tamarind paste added to the marinade will help to tenderize and give a "sour" flavour.

When serving, a couple of quartered lemons on the plate to squeeze over the chicken, and add a few finely sliced onions to the garnish.

Thanks again - its good to see another tandoori enthusiast smile

Last edited by GeoffP (Fri 07 Nov 08 10:26am)

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