Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#31 Wed 27 Oct 04 8:07am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Wow! I'm so happy to hear that your meal turned out well. You can't go wrong with the flavours of butter and foie. The Harry's (haricotverts), are a nice veg. to level things off. Also the deglazing with Cognac, lovely. I saw that you got a nice wine to pair. Bon appetit!
Everything's cool in Miami, thanks. Just keeping busy! Take care, hope all is smooth in Vienna.

Ciao,
Mary  big_smile

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#32 Wed 27 Oct 04 12:30pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Mary,

if I remember correctly you mentioned in some other thread that you like duck? If you do here is something I tried recently which turned out great!

1 duckbreast per person, skin cut diagonally or like a "chessboard" about 1/2 cm appart.
szechuan pepper, slightly crushed
coarse sea salt
hoisin sauce

Rub szechuan pepper and sea salt into the skin. Heat a pan to medium high temperature and fry the duck on the skin side for about 3-4 minutes. Turn over and cook for just 1-2 min on this side. Turn back to the skin side and brush flesh side with a generouse amount of hoisin sauce.

Finish in the oven at 160°C until still nice and pink in the middle (about 8 min).

Cut into thin slices and arrange on top of a pak choy stirfry (pak choy - cut into quaters, ginger, garlic, szechuan pepper, soy sauce, sesame oil).

And a glass of fruity Riesling to acompany it!

Enjoy ;-)

ciao
Claudia

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#33 Thu 28 Oct 04 8:48am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Claudia!
I enjoy this combo very much! I could eat duck and hoisin for days.   big_smile   Thanks so much for the recipe. I enjoy reading all of your recipes. You have an excellent way with food. If there is anything else you may have in your back pocket, please don't hesitate to share.
I hope everything is going well in Vienna for you. Take it easy!

Kind Regards,
Mary In Miami  big_smile

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#34 Thu 28 Oct 04 8:28pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Mary!

Know what you mean about duck and hoisin - liked the combo ever since I first had crispy duck ;-)

Well, actually if you love duck, there might just be a recipe in my "back pocket" **smile** It's from one of my first cookbooks - eatART recipes in red (guess why I bought that...)

Here you go:

Duckbreast with lingonberries
-----------------------------
2 duckbreasts
salt
1/8 liter red wine
water
2-3 tbsp blac current jelly
200g lingonberries
few knobs of butter

1-2 tsp black pepper corns, crushed
2 tsp cloves, crushed
nutmeg, grated

Coarsely crush black peppers and cloves and mix with nutmeg.
Cut the fatside of the breast crosswise and genorously sprincle with seasalt and mixed herbs. Cook first on the fatside (3 min) then on the flesh side (2 min), turn back to the fat-side and finish in the oven at 160 for aprox 6-8 min.
Take out the duckbreasts and cover with tinfoil. Remove most of the fat from the pan then deglase with red wine. Reduce to a thick sauce. Add lingonberries, black current jelly and let warm through. Add butter.
Slice the duckbreast and serve with berry sauce, red cabbage and gnocci in walnut butter.

I like spreading the flesh side with some french red mustard (mustard made with red wine – don’t know the exact name, sorry…)

If you use cranberries you'll have to cook them a little longer...

Everything fine in Vienna and another long weekend before me as Monday is a holiday! And Halloween to celebrate (evenso it's not typical it's catching on over here too!! ***buhhahhaha***

ciao + CU
Claudia

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#35 Fri 29 Oct 04 8:03am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Claudia,
Just reading the recipe my mouth is watering. I can just see this with the duck medium rare. Really good! Thanks! Like the name of the cook book. Any other interesting recipes in there?
Claudia, what is the name of the french mustard with red wine? That sounds delicious as well.
Glad to know things are smooth in Vienna. Have a wonderful Holiday/Halloween weekend. I have some friends that are in a band locally. They'll be performing Halloween night. I plan on going to see them after work. It should be fun. Take care.

Ciao,
Mary  big_smile

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#36 Fri 29 Oct 04 6:27pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Mary, found it ;-) It's acutally violet mustard "Moustarde Violette de Brive" or also "limousin moustarde" (because of the region it originates in), which combines sweetness and spicyness and is dark violet in colour. --> well it is yummy ;-) And if you can ever get your hands on it try it!

Here something I found on the net:
"Grand Moutardier - a honorary title that came from a Pope's love of mustard
In the 14th century in Avignon, the city of the popes, John XXII became so fond of this condiment that he created the post of "Pope's First Mustard-Maker." In the 16th century, Pope Clement VI, a native of the Limousin region, nicknamed "The Magnificent" because of the pomp of his pontifical court in Avignon, suddenly remembered while at table one day that the region of Roziers-d'Egletons in Corrèze, his birthplace, made a unique purple mustard. He sent an urgent order, summoning a mustard-maker to Avignon to prepare the famous mustard for him. Messire Jaubertie performed his duty so well that he was named "Grand Moutardier du Pape." "
For more info see http://gourmet.sympatico.ca/spices/mustard/mustard2.htm

And here the page of a manufacturer (at least I think it is, hope your Frensh is better then mine, because there isn't a English version http://www.denoix.com/main.htm)

So now if you ever get it, you've got to try this! It's so lovely!!!!

Lapereau a la moutarde violette (rabbit in mustard sauce)
--------------------------------
2 rabbit backs or joints
salt and pepper
2 Tbsp best quality butter (they suggest Echiré)
1 Onion, thinly sliced
200g violet Mustard (or a bit less)
2 bacon (?translation)
200 ml red wine
1 thyme

Season the rabbit with salt and pepper and saute all around, put to the side. Saute the onion in the same pan, season with salt and pepper and add thyme. Smear the rabbit with the mustard keeping back 1 tbsp. Lay the rabbit back into the pan on top of the onion and cover with the bacon. Bake in the oven without cover for aprox. 20 min at 220°C.
Take out the meat and cover with foil. Take out the onion and put the pan with juices back on the heat. Deglase with wine, reduce by halve. Add butter and mustard.
Serve Rabbit, onion, bacon and drizzle with sauce.
Potatoe gratin goes wonderful with this (especially with a bit of truffle oil ;-)

BTW Mary, perhaps you can enlighten me. In German there are two words which translate into "rabbit" but are very different. One (Kaninchen) has white, very tender meat with a bit of a vanilla taste (well at leat I think so), the other (Hase) is the wild variety with dark, gamy meat which is nice to stew longer. Are there also different English termes for the two, and what are they!? (Oh and the white fleshed variety is used for the above recipe...)

Have a spooky weekend with great musik!! (BTW what kind of musik is this band into)

all the best
Claudia

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#37 Sat 30 Oct 04 5:01am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Claudia,
Thanks very much for the info. on the mustard. I also liked the bit of history. I love reading the history behind different types of food. I'll go to various specialty shops to see if I can find it. Thanks for the links.
Over here, If I am not mistaken it's rabbit and hare. Living in Texas, you'll hear people there speak of Jack Rabbit (a very large size rabbit). The distinction is basically what you stated. There are farms that grow them for consumption, and I'm sure there are various breeds. I hope that was of some help.
The recipe looks great. We ate rabbit a lot in Colombia when growing up. I really enjoyed it. Potato Gratin with white truffle oil, oh yes. When you have time, please post some more recipes for me Claudia. It will be nice to look forward to.
I've got friends in different types of bands. The one performing this weekend plays original punkish music. Kind of like The Ramones. Everyone seems to like it when they perform. They sound tight and energetic. I'm looking forward to it. It should be fun.
Happy Halloween! Have a good one.

Ciao,
Mary  big_smile

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#38 Sun 31 Oct 04 7:15pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: Foodology

Know what you mean, I love reading up on different kinds of food or ingrediences, to see where they come from etc. (got some great books about France, Spain and Italy where there is one chapter per region about typical food they serve - that's where I found out about that mustard too ;-)

Thanks about the rabbit/hare info - never knew what it was called and dictionaries don't seem to provide this sort of info **arg**

Oh you grew up in Colombia just looked up some info on the net, because I didn't know much about it! Something I didn't find - and would interest me, what are traditional dishes in that part of the world? Any great recipes you could share **smile** know ther must be.....

How was the concert?! Went to the The Ramones webpage to see what they do, sounds interesting! Had a lovely Pre-Halloween dinner-party yesterday, well not much to do with Halloween but a nice small party, with lovely food + drinks ;-))

Oh and now I just had lovely leek-mushroom-bake pots (Gary Rhodes)! It's more of a rustic dish but lovely!!!

you'll need:
same amounts of
thinly sliced leek
quartered mushrooms (best mix of wild and "normal)
garlic, chopped
thyme
eggs
single creme seasoned with salt and pepper
cheese (parmesan, blue cheese, "normal" cheese, whatever you fancy)
parsley
butter+olive oil

Heat a mixtre of olive oil and butter and saute leeks with 1/2 garlic and a few thyme leaves.  Season with salt and pepper and set aside.
Heat some more olive oil and butter and saute mushrooms, garlic and parsley until just cooked. Mix with the leek.
Cover the bottom of some ramikins with single creme. Cover with the leek-mushroom mixture. Sprinkle with some cheese and than put an egg on top. Put a few tablespoons of seasoned single creme over the egg. Bake for aprox 10 min at 200°C until the egg is waxy but not hard.

Serve with crusty white bread as a main dish or to acompany grilled meat... The perfect comfort food ;-)

all the best, ciao
Claudia

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#39 Mon 01 Nov 04 12:14am

Merridith

Member
From Atlanta, GA USA
Member since Mon 21 Jun 04

Re: Foodology

Those recipes and menu ideas sound OUT OF THIS WORLD!!!  Do you have a restaurant?  If you do, I'll DEFINITELY be stopping in next time I'm in Miami.   big_smile

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#40 Mon 01 Nov 04 7:01pm

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Thanks for the leek / shroom recipe. Sounds really good.........love that combo. No problem with the info., anytime.
I will do my best to get some recipes from Colombia for you. The majority are written in Spanish, so I will translate them for you.
The Halloween gig was good. Lots of people showed up. They all seemed to enjoy the music. It was great fun! My friends in the band were happy with the turn out. BTW, the band's name is GNARLY.
It sounds like you had a wonderful weekend with your friends as well. Did you make risotto nero?
Claudia, take care. keep the wonderful information coming. My best to you and yours in Vienna!

Ciao,
Mary   big_smile

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