forum: Food & Drink

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#31 Sun 17 Jun 07 9:42am

Chanr

Forum champ
From Melbourne
Member since Mon 14 Mar 05

Re: Rice Cooker

Sorry to just butt in here, but my my family uses the Shuttle Chef every night for the soup. It's like a giant thermos, except that you put the pot (with its lid) that comes with it straight off the hob (with say, congee inside), and directly into the outer insulation shell and slap the lid shut. Because it's so effective at retaining the hot temprature, the food keeps cooking from the residual heat, without the need of any power (so no worries about forgetting to turn off the flame, or an unsupervised hob  if you're busy). It's also great for stews, casseroles, and basically any slow-cooked dishes. In this sense, it kind of is a slow cooker, but informally.

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#32 Sun 17 Jun 07 10:13am

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Rice Cooker

Ah.. Chanr...It sounds like it works on the same principal as the old big 'hay box' that we would use about 35 years ago when camping at 'Girl Guide ' camps!!
lol

We used to get a large wooden 'tea chest' (the sort that loose tea was delivered to the suppliers in,...a large plywood box that had metal strips joining the edges together.)
This would then be packed well at the base and sides with hay and only leaveing  space at the center , for the largest pan.
Over the evening campfire the porridge for breakfast would be heated up untill the milk was boiling hot.
The lid was put on the pan, the pan into the centre haybox and more hay on top of that to insulate it. bit if wood on the top, then in the morning... clap ..perfectly cooked hot porridge for breakfast!!

I seem to remember it was something that tasted realy good.But you did get the occasional bit of hay in with the porridge !!  lol  I seem to remember that it was also used in the mornings to start cooing the stews for supper . On the same principal, the stew would be started cooking over the camp fire and  the saucepan put into the haybox.The stew would generally need a bit of 'finishing off' over the camp fire.
Boiled potatoes were also cooked in the box..(thinking about it we must have had more than one hay box!) the poatoes in water would be bought to the boil ,almost totaly drained, then the lid put on and pan into haybox, the potates would cook in their own steam.

A shuttle chef would have been a lot more convinient though  lol  and less cumbersome !

Last edited by mummza (Sun 17 Jun 07 10:21am)

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#33 Mon 18 Jun 07 2:12am

frizz1974

Forum super champ
Occupation Mother of 2 working more than full time
From Wallerawang, Oz
Member since Wed 29 Jun 05

Re: Rice Cooker

Does anyone use the steamer that can be inserted above the rice to steam fish or veg etc while cooking the rice?

I suppose it would be ok, if you didnt have the rice cooker too full or that starchy bubbley water would get on the food.

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#34 Mon 18 Jun 07 4:53am

bcrain

Forum champ
Occupation Duty Free Lancome and Fragrance sales
From Greater Vancouver
Member since Mon 23 Oct 06

Re: Rice Cooker

Thanks Chanr, you didn't butt in at all! It kind of sounded like a slow cooker but since it doesnt actually look like one I wasn't sure. smile

Frizz, I use a separate steamer if I am steaming fish but thats just my preference and managability.

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#35 Mon 18 Jun 07 5:11am

stuvik

Member
Occupation IT - Programmer
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Tue 22 May 07

Re: Rice Cooker

Chanr, by all means "butt in" lol I couldn't have described it better. I like making curries with my shuttle chef. Bring the food to a simmering boil and then put it in the housing. By the time I get back to it, the meat flakes off the bone.

Frizz, I can't say I have a steamer for the rice cooker. What my parent's used to do was position a pair of bamboo/wooden chopsticks on top on the cooker and have a plate on top of that with things to keep warm. Cooking things like Chinese preserved sausage ("lup cheung" pronounced "lup ch-erng") was generally done by tossing the sausage directly on top of the rice before it started cooking. This would also flavour the rice while it was cooking.

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#36 Mon 18 Jun 07 5:13am

frizz1974

Forum super champ
Occupation Mother of 2 working more than full time
From Wallerawang, Oz
Member since Wed 29 Jun 05

Re: Rice Cooker

Stuvik, I have seen lup cheung in the supermarket in vaccuum packs but wasnt sure what to do with them... bsides putiing them in the rice cooker what else can they be used for?

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#37 Mon 18 Jun 07 5:56am

stuvik

Member
Occupation IT - Programmer
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Tue 22 May 07

Re: Rice Cooker

Lup cheung has a sweet-savoury taste to it and must be cooked before eating. As far as I've seen, it comes in 2 varieties: the red pork sausage, and the dark brown duck liver sausage. I love both but, as with everything, moderation is best.

You can eat them plain, thinly sliced and eaten as a side dish on their own or you can chop them up and use them to add flavour to other dishes such as steamed chicken with black fungus, steamed fish, sticky rice, san choy bao, dim sims, savoury dumpling filling, etc. They compliment savoury/salty dishes remarkably well. Even simple vegetable dishes benefit from some sliced chinese sausage. E.g. poached choy sum (or bok choy) with oyster sauce sprinkled with a few pan fried slices of lup cheung and scattered around/on top.
Boiling them will make them lose their flavour and leaves you with chewy lumps of tasteless sausage so take care using them in dishes with a lot of water/stock.

For most instances, you should only need only one or two sausages at a time since the flavour is that strong and can easily overpower a dish. If you think about them in a 'similar' vein as chinese BBQ pork you'll get a good idea on how to use them.

Regards.

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#38 Mon 18 Jun 07 7:10am

Chanr

Forum champ
From Melbourne
Member since Mon 14 Mar 05

Re: Rice Cooker

You might also want to try out 'Chinese dried, salt preserved duck'. All you do is put a bit on top of the rice when you're cooking it.  It's got a good layer of fat underneath the skin, and the meat is is extremely salty, so you really don't need much. It imparts a wonderfully deep flavour to the rice.

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#39 Mon 18 Jun 07 7:44am

frizz1974

Forum super champ
Occupation Mother of 2 working more than full time
From Wallerawang, Oz
Member since Wed 29 Jun 05

Re: Rice Cooker

Thanks, Stuvik, I will give it a go.

Chanr, I havent seen the duck, the only asian stuff available to me usually is in Coles. We had quite a substantial asian section until recently, but I can get my fave soy, noodles & a few other bits & peices.

Im going to Sydney next month for my Dads 75th bday, he lives in an area that has a strong asian influence so Im going to make sure I get to an asian grocery while Im there.

When I go to Sydney normally, Im usually going to the in laws place, and they live on the outskirts, and have only recently gotten a decent deli... roll

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#40 Mon 18 Jun 07 8:05am

stuvik

Member
Occupation IT - Programmer
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Tue 22 May 07

Re: Rice Cooker

Chanr, I would put salt preserved duck/pork, and lup cheng into a sticky rice or a non-sticky flavoured rice with some preserved vegetables, dried (rehydrated) chinese mushrooms and ginger. Dried scallops also is a fantastic infuser. *drools* Now look what you made me do :P

Almost like a chinese-style 'paella' but cooked in a rice cooker big_smile

Frizz, there are plenty of asian supermarkets and grocery stores all over Sydney. All of them will at least have lup cheng. The salty preserved duck/pork should be fairly common too. If you can't find salted/preserved pork then salted bacon bones are a good substitute.

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