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#1 Thu 19 Jun 08 4:04pm

bravedave

Member
Member since Thu 19 Jun 08

Sheep on the Spit

Hello all,

This weekend I am throwing a party to celebrate my Moms 60th Birthday.  We are having a sheep on the spit and I am looking for a recipe to baste the lamb whilst it is cooking.

If you have any ideas, please let me know.

Many thanks

Dave

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#2 Fri 20 Jun 08 7:59am

VENUS

Forum champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Sheep on the Spit

Recipe: 1 whole lamb all innards removed (15-20kgs)
Salt, freshly ground pepper and cumin powder.
Strained fresh lemon juice
Olive oil
Oregano / thyme
Preparing your lamb:
Have butcher remove all innards from lamb. Rub inside of lamb with salt and pepper.

Pass skewer between animal's hind legs, tying them to the rod, then carefully through the stomach cavity and through it's chin and mouth. Tie the front and back legs to the skewer and be sure that the back of the animal is straight on the skewer.

The skewer should come out exactly in the middle of the animal's mouth. Tie the middle of the animal to the skewer and sew the stomach cavity closed. Rub the entire surface of the lamb (or goat) with lemon juice, olive oil, salt, pepper, cumin powder and oregano or thyme.

Roast lamb over slow-burning coals - the fire should be started at least 2 hours before cooking the animal - by turning slowly and steadily for several hours.

Do not put the charcoal/heat beads directly under your meat whilst cooking. This is to ensure that when the oil and fat from the meat drips, your meat will not catch on fire. The charcoal/heat beads should be positioned towards the front of the spit tray.

Brush intermittently during roasting with a mixture of lemon juice, olive oil, and oregano or thyme. When the skin on the shoulders and legs begins to burst and the lamb or goat becomes the colour of deep redwood or chestnut, the meat should be fork-tender. This will take at least 4 hours of slow spit-roasting. Carefully remove the lamb or goat from skewer and carve.

As the size of each beast varies, it is recommended that you ask your butcher for an estimated cooking time.

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#3 Fri 20 Jun 08 10:07am

bravedave

Member
Member since Thu 19 Jun 08

Re: Sheep on the Spit

Many thanks for your reply, its really appreciated.

Dave

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