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#31 Wed 16 Jul 08 12:26pm

eduard1018

Member
Member since Sat 31 Mar 07

Re: Medieval cooking

P.S.

On a different note...I remembered an episode from "Lizzie Maguire" (.. I admit, I used to watch it, for the lack of good television...but was it a good alternative? hehe) where they would research about things medieval as they were to join a school contest. 

I guess what I want to point out, is that they claimed in the show that the people of those times used to salt their meat a lot as a means for them to preserve their food - obviously, refrigerators weren't invented yet.

I don't know what good this post will do, a little trivia I guess.  (all thanks to Lizzie Maguire) hehe...

again..

Eduard     big_smile

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#32 Wed 16 Jul 08 3:40pm

Jay30

Member
Occupation ... basking in the sun....
From Anguilla & Liechtenstein
Member since Fri 17 Jun 05

Re: Medieval cooking

While maybe not going back to Medieval times but still ancient cooking techniques - I live in the Caribbean and just bought a coal pot like it has been used for almost centuries in this part of the world to cook anything in from fish to goat to fried doughs (jonny cakes etc.). I will certainly try to cook a nice "goat water" (sort of goat soup / goat stew) and some cakes in it - if anybody has any other inspirations or any experience would be nice to hear.

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#33 Wed 16 Jul 08 4:18pm

rabbit77

Member
Occupation chef
From Townsville
Member since Fri 15 Sep 06

Re: Medieval cooking

Australia is the lucky country....Why?
Not just the fact that we have an awsome piece of land but we have also had a bit of a hand with our food from our fellow Pacific friends. In PNG its called a Moo Moo, in other areas its a Hungi ( though traditionally cooked in areas of valcanic thermal activity with out the use of fire though both are similar in principle). A Moo Moo though you start a big fire in a big whole with allot of rocks amongst it. Prep your meat, which generaly is a pig wrapped in banana leaves, also your potatoes, sweet potoatoes, yams etc
then remove some of the rocks from the fire then goes the meat and veg then ontop goes banana leaves then the hot rocks you removed then soil...... Although these days tarps can be used to keep the heat in. It takes hours to cook and prep but evryone gets in on it. I grew up in PNG and have eaten many a Moo Moo and in the last 12yrs have eaten and preped them in peoples suburban backyards. This style of cooking dates so far back Im not even sure it has a date, but for today they are a good feed and a whole day of work, waiting and beer........... Or Carva
Cheers to good eating yummy

Last edited by rabbit77 (Wed 16 Jul 08 4:24pm)

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#34 Wed 16 Jul 08 4:39pm

yetsize

Member
Occupation Landscape Architect
From Lisboa
Member since Wed 16 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

roocusroidy wrote:

Mate,
sounds like you are interested in cooking techniques..... Medieval or something similar.....Have you ever thought of the traditional New Zealand Hāngi?? or get this.... a cooking technique that utilises natural thermal (volcanic) activity!!!??

an idea.........that's all it takes!
:P

In the Azores Islands we use cooking techniques in a similar way, wholes in rocks with very high temperatures vapores. And very good dishes are cooked there. Actually the Islands (both Azores and Madeira) have many unseen/unusual cooking techniques. In Madeira I remember eating chunks of meat in a laurel stick barbequed, it's just an exquisite flavor, with the company of a typical Madeira poncho... mmmm!

But I came here for a 2nd recipe (pardon my translation, again)  oops

Hen in Potagem (Clay Pot) the French way

Ingredients for four persons:
4 big over-thighs of hen
200 gr fresh liver of hen
40 gr of mustard in grains
30 gr of bacon
30 gr of pricked onions
100 ml extra olive oil 
20 gr of fresh mixed herbs (laurel, rosemary, salvia, nutmeg, clove)
3 gr of whole cardamom 
12 slices of grilled tomatoes
240 gr potatoes in cubes
15 gr of pricked parsley
1,5 lt of water
Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:
Mild frying of the over-thighs with the flavorings up to gilding, withdraw from the frying pan the hen and leave it separate, in the same frying pan put the liver till it gets a beautiful color. Withdraw the livers and take them to the oven for 3 minutes to get a firm consistence. The over-thighs and all other ingredients will be put in a saucepan to cook during 45 minutes in gentle fire (without the livers). After that take out the hen and leave them separated.

Preparation of the french sauce:
With the broth of cooking the over-thighs mix in the mustard and add the liver (properly pricked in small cubes) and lead to the fire to acquire a good consistency, once having the ready sauce begin the assembly of the plate.

Assembly of the plate:
Put the hen over-thigh in a half of the plate, in another half, put the sauce, over it the grilled slices of tomatoes and, on the side the potatoes pulverizing them with the pricked parsley, to serve very warm

See you next dish, and enjoy

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#35 Wed 16 Jul 08 5:06pm

clipp2

Member
Occupation Retired
From Surrey BC, Canada
Member since Wed 16 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Fascinating topic Jamie.  I grew up in northern Saskatchewan, Canada,  in a small town called Crystal Springs population 110 or so at it's highest.  When I was a child, a travelling carnival would set up on the Beaver Flats just outside of town and the men of the community would cook roast beef in a pit. My father was one of the cooks for many years.

A large hole was dug in the ground, sand was shovelled into the bottom, followed by a thick layer of rocks. The stones were approximately 8-12 inches in diameter.  A large bonfire was built on top of the stones and it was kept burning for 24 hours.

Huge beef roasts were salted and wrapped in sheets of foil, which were then wrapped in multiple layers of well-soaked burlap.  After the fire had died down, the burlap packages were set on top of the glowing rocks.  The whole thing was covered with several more layers of wet burlap, and the ground was shoveled back into the hole.  The meat was then left to cook for a full day. 

The great dig-out and unwrapping was the highpoint of the fair and families came from miles around for the mouth-watering beef dinner served up by the good ladies of the community.

In 2006 the town held a reunion with over 800 former residents returning. The high point of the weekend was a traditional beef dinner cooked in-ground.  One thing the young men forgot to do was leave markers to show where to start digging to uncover the meat, which made for a lot of fun until the corner of the pit was found.

Last edited by clipp2 (Wed 16 Jul 08 5:21pm)

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#36 Wed 16 Jul 08 6:01pm

rabbit77

Member
Occupation chef
From Townsville
Member since Fri 15 Sep 06

Re: Medieval cooking

its amazing that thse primitive ways of cooking  ( I mean in a whole with hot rocks) are still know over the world and still practise I hope....Hehe As really don't you think that one day ago or many more then 1 it all started in the same place? The last 2 blogs have geographicallyblown my mind as far as when and whom started it??????

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#37 Wed 16 Jul 08 9:32pm

Waciuk

Member
Member since Wed 16 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

I have had an interest in Medieval cooking for a while now. Here are a couple of links to very good sites on Medieval cooking:

http://www.godecookery.com/

http://www.medievalcookery.com/index.shtm

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#38 Wed 16 Jul 08 11:16pm

seamusmcspud

Member
Member since Wed 16 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hey,
you should try a Fulachta Fia  these are ancient Celtic cooking places, which usually appear on the landscape as small mounds. They are numerous in Ireland, there are over 5,000 recorded. Fulacht means cooking pit. Fiadh perhaps derives from the Irish word 'fia' meaning deer or from 'fian' meaning wild. Or possibly from ancient Irish tribe the 'Fianna', who are described as having used these sites. They consist of a pit, dug near a stream, lined with wood, stone or clay then filled with water. Meat was cooked in the water, which was heated by hot stones taken from a nearby fire.

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/archive/ … 77672.html

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#39 Thu 17 Jul 08 12:44am

shonan234

Member
Member since Sat 05 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

hi jamie thks 4 getin bk 2 me, well u no wht i mean.
im goung 2 a new level with the school dinners im going 2 round all the house's tht i now and c if there children go 2 the same school tht ma son goes 2 and c wht they think of them.
i know wht there will say as i have all ready spoke with quite alot of the parents and they say the same with me.
fingers crossed i get some where but im tryin ma best 2 get the school dinners bk 2 good food tht every child likes.
u no my son eats prity much every thing the only thing he will not eat is sweetcorn
but i dont mind as he eats all the rest of the fruit and veg.
i jist want the school dinners 2 be good as its not far from winter and it comes in quick so i want my son to have something hot, u no and think the other kids 2 b the same. cany w8 to here from u agen bye:) smile

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#40 Thu 17 Jul 08 1:12am

yetsize

Member
Occupation Landscape Architect
From Lisboa
Member since Wed 16 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

By the way the portuguese chef that wrote the historical romance I'm taking the recipes is Hélio Loureiro...

Recipe 3

"ROJÕES"  (ROCKETS???)

Ingredients:
800 g of pork from the leg
3 dl of green white wine (produce of the northern region of Portugal)
40 g of fat
2 pieces of garlic
2 leafs of laurel
salt and pepper
20 roast chestnuts
100 g of pork liver
100 g of cooked blood

Preparation:
Cut the pork into cubes, marinate them for 2 hours in the wine, with the garlic smashed, salt, pepper and laurel.
Put it on strong fire and leave it to cook till the wine evaporates. Then join the fat, and in gentle fire, let cook the cubes of pork until they get a beautiful colour.
Withdraw a little of the fat of cooking the pork for a frying pan and fry the liver and the blood cut in slices. Then join the roasted chestnuts in, after pealing them.
Serve in a tray with roasted potatoes and slices of apple slightly fryed in butter.

thumbsup

Last edited by yetsize (Thu 17 Jul 08 1:15am)

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