Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#41 Thu 17 Jul 08 5:24am

Nacks

Member
Member since Wed 16 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

I think someone else mentioned this but I will double up anyway... a couple of years ago I was on holiday in New Zealand and while in Rotorua I had some traditional Maori food that was cooked in a thermal spring (the spring looked like a naturally formed giant cauldron in the ground bubbling away!). I believe that Maori people have been cooking food that way for many hundreds of years! It tasted great! No gas/power/burning wood required smile.

I love New Zealand, great place!  big_smile

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#42 Thu 17 Jul 08 9:02am

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Medieval cooking

rabbit77,
we really are there where it started, that is the fascinating thing about travelling on the wings of food, you never know where you are landed and in which "era", I think beyond all studies on DNA, there are lots of surviving knowledge "astuzie" flowing in our veins that cannot be proven by any machine, but are undoubtedly there, the point is not to let them sleep, and that is what  people like Jamie with his enthusiasm do

bravi everybody!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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#43 Thu 17 Jul 08 10:05am

Alian

Member
Member since Thu 17 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Dear Jamie,
I was a volunteer in a dutch archeological theme park (archeon) for a couple of years. Here they have made reconstructions of certain ages: from hunters/gatherers huts trough medieval town and monastery. The park is "inhabited" by re-anactors, people (like me) who try to really show the way of living, including cookery. I used to be in de bronze-age farm so I have not a lot of experience with medieval cookery. We exchanged recipes and thougts between the ages though. Bread baking was still quite the same allthough grinding the flower is much harder in de bronze age (by hand) In medieval times they closed the wood-oven doors with dough, did you know that? it makes is possible to check the baking proces in the oven from the outside: if the bread on the door (that also prevends leaking of hot air) is ready, the bread on the inside is too! In my bronze age, the flower was so hard-worked for, that we rather closed our oven with clay.
I found you some links to interesting websites with medieval recipes ( in Dutch and/or English) I'm not sure if it is allowed to post them here?

what I still use regularly in my kitchen is smoking (but i do have a modern smoker-pan), making lentill soup, and my special way to prepare trout. Take fresh trouts, cleaned (or clean them first) put herbs that you find (I usually make this recipe when camping) in the cavitiy (thyme, cut sorrelleaves, rosemary, some "daslook"(a herb that smells like garlic but looks like lily of the valley, i don't know the english word for it,javascript:emoticon('oops') sorry.) combine it with pieces of bacon (lardons). Roll the trouts in sorrelleaves and put them on the (coles of the) fire or barbeque. It tastes so very good!
yummy

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#44 Thu 17 Jul 08 11:02am

Eudora1974

Member
Member since Tue 15 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hi from Spain (from the southeast),

It`s difficult talk about medieval inheritance in our gastronomy... do you know a typical spanish recipe, from coast to coast, named "migas"; is a recipe wich came from the shepherds and farmers, they did it in open air, with a bonfire and a pan; flour or bread, and any kind of meat or sausages, even salted fish... perhaps the italian gastronomy have something like this. I think that the "migas" is a very old recipe, perhaps medieval.

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#45 Thu 17 Jul 08 4:37pm

Zhang

Member
Member since Thu 17 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

W. [Visitor]
Thu 17 Jul 2008 @ 15:27
Hello, i love food and all the fantastic pictures never fail each time to make my mouth water  yummy  clap  I have a home economics project (We have to cook a dish and within one hour) and i would really love it if you could share some recipes and ideas with me? I was thinking perhaps prawns or chicken because i can get fresh prawns and thats the best!  big_smile   help  help  help  help  help  help  help

Loving your ideas, jamie!  thumbsup

P.S Please reply as soon as possible please because the recipe is due next week! But i'll understand if you really cant because you are busy  big_smile

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#46 Thu 17 Jul 08 4:40pm

marciacrg

Member
Occupation Jornalism
From Brasília - Brazil
Member since Wed 25 Jun 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hi dear Jamie

I finaly made my own pasta. It was great but it´s long so much because was the first time. I were thinking if pasta was possible in medieval time... What are you think? smile

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#47 Thu 17 Jul 08 4:49pm

kever

Member
Member since Thu 17 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hi Jamie!

Last Year I completed a 2 year Culinary Course and I have just started my own Catering Business. I have not used the medievil cooking methods you discribe however I love the flavour of food that has been cooked over an open flame. Also do you have any tips you could give me about  large catering? I am just doing  maximum 50 people right now, but I want to get into hundreds and was wondering how you cook all that food at once for that many people and not have it go cold on ya?

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#48 Thu 17 Jul 08 5:28pm

SueJohnson

Member
From Lancashire
Member since Mon 14 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

marciacrg wrote:

Hi dear Jamie

I finaly made my own pasta. It was great but it´s long so much because was the first time. I were thinking if pasta was possible in medieval time... What are you think? smile

I'm sure it was.  I vaguely remember from my research years ago that pasta/noodles of some sort were eaten in 13th century Italy.  If only I could remember where all my medieval books were (somewhere in a box in the attic...)

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#49 Thu 17 Jul 08 9:27pm

marciacrg

Member
Occupation Jornalism
From Brasília - Brazil
Member since Wed 25 Jun 08

Re: Medieval cooking

SueJohnson wrote:

marciacrg wrote:

Hi dear Jamie

I finaly made my own pasta. It was great but it´s long so much because was the first time. I were thinking if pasta was possible in medieval time... What are you think? smile

I'm sure it was.  I vaguely remember from my research years ago that pasta/noodles of some sort were eaten in 13th century Italy.  If only I could remember where all my medieval books were (somewhere in a box in the attic...)

exclaim
Tanks for this information....

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#50 Thu 17 Jul 08 11:04pm

ambersmum

Member
Member since Thu 17 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hello Jamie,

I hope this doesn't violate any copyright laws but I have a perfect recipe for you.

It comes from a cookbook I purchased called "Pe Bors Hede Boke of Cookry" (all in the old script that I cannot reproduce here)
Food and Cooking in the 14th and 15th Century England by Roger Shell and Sally Charles. Published by Camlann Medieval Association, 10320 Kelly Road NE, Carnation, Wa. 98014. USA

stekys of venson or bef

Take Venyson or Bef & leche & gredly it vp broun - pen take Vynegre & a litel verious & a lytil Wyne & putte pouder perpir per-on y-now and pouder Gyngere & atte pe dressoure straw on pouder Canelle y-now pat pe stekys be al y-helid per-wyth & but a litel Sawce & pan serue it forth.~ Harl. 279.ii.31

TRANSLATION:

"Take venison or beef, slice it, and brown on a griddle. Then take vinegar, a little verjuice, and a little wine, and put on enough powdered pepper and ginger, and at the serving table strew on enough powdered cinnamon that the steaks are all covered with it, and just a little sauce, and then serve it."

RECIPE:

VENISON OR BEEF STEAKS

4 6-oz. tender beef or venison steaks
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 cup red wine
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
dash pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground ginger

Pan broil steaks until done to your preference. Remove from pan and sprinkle steaks evenly with cinnamon; set aside, keeping warm. Pour any excess fat from pan. Over medium high heat add wine to pan, stirring to dissolve brown meat residue. Mix in vinegar, lemon juice, pepper and ginger, and boil to reduce sauce slightly. Serve steaks with a tablespoon of sauce poured over each.

Enjoy!
ambersmum

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