forum: Everything else

Subscribe to forums RSS

#1 Thu 08 Jan 09 10:18am

lillianfjortoft

Member
Member since Thu 08 Jan 09

Outdoor cooking for children

I am going to have a "cooking outdoors for children" course for 40 people, and I'm looking for new recepies. In Norway we spend much time outdoors - and always make bonfires. Always. Everyone brings their sausages and breads to make hot dogs. And the ketchup and mustard.

Well I want to show them something else. I have all sorts of pots and pans for outdoor cooking. (Not wheelbarow but wok, big pan and big caserole for soups) I allready have some good ideas. I need some more.

I have ideas like soups, risotto, pizza, varieties of fish. Anything else; like bread, desserts, making simple ovens etc. I should be very grateful.

Greetings from Norway

LF
- Big Jyikes: fan. Massive, in fact.

    Likes (0)

#2 Thu 08 Jan 09 11:18am

CraigJ

Member
From Townsville, Australia
Member since Mon 29 Dec 08

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

Sounds like fun, I wouuld try search for "lemonade Damper", which is a basic bread, it always goes down a treat when we go camping.

You could take a look at this forum, it has loads of camp oven recipes, damper included.

http://www.aussiecampovenforum.com/cgi- … b2/YaBB.pl

Have fun.

    Likes (0)

#3 Thu 08 Jan 09 11:41am

lillianfjortoft

Member
Member since Thu 08 Jan 09

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

clap
Thank you very much!
I'm impressed

Lemonade Damper looks delicious.

A great big world out there on the Net. Norway is a tiny country, you can not even buy Self Raising Flour. Flour and dried yeast - I beleive?

Thank you all over again.

L

    Likes (0)

#4 Thu 08 Jan 09 12:49pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

Self - Raising flour is plain flour, with added baking powder, a chemical raising agent - usually a mixture of sodium bicarbonate and potassium hydrogen tartrate (bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar).

Typically, this would be:-

100 g flour
3 g baking powder
1 g or less salt

Baking powder is 1 part bicarbonate of soda to 2 parts cream of tartar.

    Likes (0)

#5 Thu 08 Jan 09 12:55pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

An impressive and really easy thing to do on a fire is a Planked Salmon - here is a description I found for you:-

Last time I planked a salmon I had been given a whole fresh caught fish from a friend who landed one on vacation but doesn't cook. I got a large cedar plank from the local hardware box store, cut off a bit of it to make chips. We built a good hot camp fire and soaked the chips. I opened the salmon down the belly leaving it attached to the back bone (butterflied) and tacked it to the board. The meat was wiped with olive oil and seasoned with salt & pepper and sprinkled with some finely minced lemon peel. We pulled coals from the fire over to one side and built up the fire in back of the coals. The wet chips were placed on the coals nearest to where the salmon would sit. The planked salmon was then propped up very close to the coals and roasted, brushed occasionally with olive oil as needed. The heat from the fire and the coals and the reflected heat from the plank cooked it in about 45 minutes. Right before the end of the cooking time I brushed it with a mix of lemon marmalade and reduced basalmic vinegar for a glaze. We pulled it off the fire, laid the plank flat, removed the tacks and served it directly off the plank.

    Likes (0)

#6 Thu 08 Jan 09 1:25pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

OK - a few more campfire cooking ideas:-

As its for children ultimately, I've tried to think of things which need none, or few implements, and few ingredients.

"Jacket Potatoes" - use one fist sized potato per person. rub with butter and sprinkle with a little salt, wrap well in foil, then stab through the foil a few times with a skewer or fork. When fire has burnt down, bury wrapped potatoes in ashes, and cook for about 45 mins (rake more ashes over if necessary). They are ready when you can squeeze them. Unwrap, then cut halfway through. Serve with a sprinkle of salt and a knob of butter, or with cheese, or coleslaw, or baked beans, or chili con carne, or tuna mayonnaise- or indeed anything savoury which you can fill them with. Keeps the kids hands warm as they eat smile

Any kind of smallish whole fresh round fish can be cooked at the campfire by gutting it, then thrusting a sharpened green stick down its throat. Rob with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, then prop at the edge of the fire until it goes golden brown.

You can do the dampers mentioned above by rolling portions out into a "snake", and wrapping one each round a peeled smooth stick - squeeze it on until the damper is in a spiral about 1/2 cm thick, then rotate the damper over the fire until cooked.

More ideas as soon as I can remember them smile

    Likes (0)

#7 Thu 08 Jan 09 1:30pm

ACDC

Forum champ
Occupation Bewitched, bothered and bewildered Mother
From Ireland
Member since Tue 19 Aug 08

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

Hi lillianfjiortoft,
Welcome to the forums.
Have you any scout groups near where you live, I'm sure they would have some tried and trusted ideas that go down well with children.

    Likes (0)

#8 Thu 08 Jan 09 1:40pm

Tara

Forum champ
Occupation Mother, Best Friend, home trained cook.
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sat 22 Dec 07

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

I haven't had a chance to read the recipe Craig gave you but I put that site in favourites, thank you Craig.

Just wanted to suggest, incase the site doesnt say so, send the little ones off to find a long strong stick.  Peel the bark of the end and wrap a good fist full of damper around it, covering the top of the stick but wrapping like the shape of a sausage.  This way they can sit by the fire at a distance and cook their damper on a stick over the hot coals.  Its like bread so gives a hollow sound when tapped.  The beautiful part, even though it may be a bit burnt and smoky with the less experienced cook, you can drizzle it in honey (or golden syrup if you can get it) once cooked. They can eat off the stick or out of a dish for the younger ones.  Yummy, now Im craving some campfire cooking.

    Likes (0)

#9 Thu 08 Jan 09 1:51pm

CraigJ

Member
From Townsville, Australia
Member since Mon 29 Dec 08

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

I have very fond memories of cooking damper by the side of a Lake where I grew up. It may very well be my first cooking experience, and at that age you are not too harsh a critic.

And yes Mrs_Master I too have a hankering for some good campfire cooking, perhaps only to reclaim the term "Dutch oven" from its current context, lol.

    Likes (0)

#10 Thu 08 Jan 09 1:56pm

Tara

Forum champ
Occupation Mother, Best Friend, home trained cook.
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sat 22 Dec 07

Re: Outdoor cooking for children

Lol, I use my cast iron cookware at home too.  Theres nothing like bacon and eggs cooked on the fire or even a roast.  We tend to go for 10 days at time so heart burn is no stranger, but who cares when the food tastes that amazing.  I would love to post some of the recipes I have come across one day, such rewarding cooking. smile

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB