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#1 Sun 23 Jan 11 1:02am

langdon

Member
From london
Member since Sun 26 Apr 09

Chinese Rice wine substitute

Hi, looking for a non alcoholic substitute to chinese rice wine or sherry.

Google says apple juice our grape juice.

Would that need to be pure 100% or will concentrated do?

This is for a sweet n sour chicken recipe.

Also If anyone has a delicious sweet N sour recipe to share, feel free

Thanks

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#2 Sun 23 Jan 11 3:20am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

Do you need to avoid alcohol completely?  The amount added to Chinese dishes is usually very small.  Chinese sauces don't simmer long enough to burn off the alcohol, but unless you need to avoid alcohol completely, using a tablespoon or so in a dish for four people is not really going to be noticeable or affect anyone.  I think it really just adds a depth of flavour to the dish, without noticeably being alcohol.

If you do want to substitute something, I think I would use half apple or grape juice and half rice vinegar.  I imagine concentrated would do, though I've never tried doing this myself.

I did a Chinese cooking course many years ago, when rice wine was not easily available in Australia.  The Chinese teacher we had used brandy, and used about a teaspoon of brandy where a recipe might normally contain about a tablespoon of rice wine.  I find this a better flavour than substituting sherry, as most western cookbooks state for Chinese recipes.

Here is the recipe for the Chinese Sweet and Sour Pork we made in the Chinese cooking course I did.  It actually contains no rice wine anyway.  You could just substitute chicken for the pork.

500g diced pork (or chicken)
1 tsp salt
dash pepper
1/2 tsp soy sauce
1 egg, lightly beaten
cornflour
oil for deep frying
1 medium onion, chopped

Sauce
1/4 c white vinegar [or rice vinegar - that's what I use these days; it's a bit milder]
1/2 c canned pineapple juice
2 tsp tomato sauce
2 tsp tomato paste
1 1/2 tb sugar
1/8 tsp salt
2-3 tsp cornflour

1 tb Chinese mixed pickles
1/4 can (440g can) pineapple pieces

* Cut pork in serving size pieces, season with salt, pepper and soy, mix into egg, and leave to marinate for 30 minutes, turning occasionally.
* Remove from marinade, dust with cornflour and deep fry until golden brown.
Stirfry onion and set aside.
* Combine sauce ingredients and bring to the boil.
* Simmer, stirring, till thickened.
* Mix in chopped Chinese pickles, pineapple, pork and onion, and heat through.

Serve with rice.

Last edited by cengland (Sun 23 Jan 11 3:21am)

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#3 Sun 23 Jan 11 4:23am

falconcy

Forum champ
Occupation Project Manager
From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

I've never seen nor used rice wine in Sweet and Sour before. Was it used as a marinade?

I normally dust my meat with a little 5 spice powder and then dip in tempura batter before frying off in a deep fryer. I make the tempura from a pack of thai premixed we get here, just add water, though it needs to be slightly thick to get the right consistency for me, your tastes may dictate otherwise.

I make up the basic sauce as per the recipe by cengland. Then I cut up peppers, pineapple and onion and then blanch them for 15-20 seconds in the deep fryer, this gives the right degree of cooked/crunch to the veggies.

Plate it up and away you go.

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#4 Sun 23 Jan 11 6:19am

bbq16

Member
Member since Sat 22 Jan 11

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

Well it's my pleasantest visit to here. Here are some kind of kind of writes which were influenced  me to create "Chinese Rice wine substitute".

Anyway "cengland" i like your recipe skills very much..

Great job!!  clap

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#5 Sun 23 Jan 11 8:55am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

smile  wave

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#6 Sun 23 Jan 11 10:12pm

langdon

Member
From london
Member since Sun 26 Apr 09

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

Cengland, you sir, are a scholar and a gentleman. I ditched my recipe and went for tours. Turned out exactly like my local chinese van. Although I did have to make a second batch of sauce cos most of my first one evaporated!

Thanks mate

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#7 Sun 23 Jan 11 10:15pm

langdon

Member
From london
Member since Sun 26 Apr 09

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

And thanks falcony, i did fry the veg, perfect texture

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#8 Mon 24 Jan 11 2:33am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

No worries, Langdon.  I'm very glad it was what you wanted.  smile

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#9 Mon 24 Jan 11 6:03pm

langdon

Member
From london
Member since Sun 26 Apr 09

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

i dont suppose you have any tips on getting restaurant like chinese boiled rice? im talking about the type that has sticky texture and form littlte clusters, without being soggy?

have tried 3 different recipes now to no avail. i now reading posts about getting hold of sushi rice or glutinous rice ?

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#10 Thu 27 Jan 11 5:43am

cengland

Forum champ
Occupation teacher
From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Chinese Rice wine substitute

Hi Langdon.  Sorry, I've been away 'out back' for a few days. 

These days I tend to cook rice in plenty of boiling water until it's mostly cooked, then strain it in a strainer and put it over a pan of simmering water to steam until it's fully cooked.  If doing it this way, I find you don't need to wash it before cooking.  It's also easy to keep the rice warm if necessary, by just keeping the water in the saucepan hot.

But here's how I was taught to do rice in Chinese cooking.  I always add  dash of salt.

STEAMED RICE

2 cups long-grain rice

* Place rice in a saucepan.  Wash rice thoroughly 4-5 times, until water is clear.
* Fill saucepan to cover the rice 2.5cm above the level of the rice (or, using your first finger held straight up and touching the top of the rice, the level of water should come above the first line of the finger joint).
* Bring water to boil on high heat, uncovered, until water evaporates and steam holes appear in the rice.  Rice will be white, not transparent.
* Cover saucepan tightly with lid, and turn heat off and cook for 20 mins.  (Note: That's for an electric stove, on which the element retains some heat after being switched off.  If using a gas stove, lower heat to ver low and cook for 20 mins, then turn heat off.  Allow to stand for 5 mins before serving.
* Stir rice before serving to separate each grain.

Remarks
Use HOT water from the tap.
Always use the same amount of water - i.e., always a water level 2.5cm above the top of the rice (this applies to any quantity of rice except when cooking more than 3 cups of rice. 
2 cups raw rice gives about 6 cups cooked rice.
If necessary, keep rice warm, covered, in a low oven.
For making Fried Rice, use water to 3.5cm above the level of the rice (or up to halfway between the first and second finger joints).

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