forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Wed 09 Feb 11 1:05pm

aliegarr

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From Blackpool
Member since Tue 19 Sep 06

Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

I have come across numerous recipes lately which use either cream, creme fraiche, fromage frais, or yoghurt. Can anyone explain the difference between them, and whether one can be substituted for another? And can they be frozen? Thanks, Ali.  smile

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#2 Wed 09 Feb 11 1:55pm

falconcy

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From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

All give a different taste, some people sub one for the other though the results will depend on the actual recipe and which one works best with that particular set of ingredients.

I'm assuming you ask if you can freeze the end recipe? It will depend on what it is and how well it freezes. Personally though I would cook from fresh each time.

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#3 Wed 09 Feb 11 2:03pm

aliegarr

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From Blackpool
Member since Tue 19 Sep 06

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

Thanks for your response. I guess a bit of experimentation will help determine whether they can be substitute successfully! smile

With regards to freezing, I meant can they be frozen as they are, ie can leftover creme fraiche be frozen, ready to use when required.

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#4 Wed 09 Feb 11 2:07pm

falconcy

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From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

I would not advise freezing any of the aforementioned ingredients in their natural state. Just buy the closest you can get to the actual quantity you need to use to avoid waste.

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#5 Wed 09 Feb 11 3:53pm

Kye

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Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

Crème fraîche is a slightly tangy, slightly nutty, thickened cream. Along with sour cream it can be used interchangeably in most recipes, but crème fraîche has two advantages over sour cream: it can be whipped like whipping cream, and it will not curdle if boiled.

Fromage frais and yogurts can be used the same way but only to compliment uncooked/cold dishes, as yogurt tends to 'break' or curdle with heat, so it has to be added at the end of cooking time.

As for freezing, except for yogurt i don't know. (We make yogurt ice cream which goes a treat with strawberrys) yummy

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#6 Wed 09 Feb 11 5:05pm

BritFinn

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From Finland
Member since Thu 26 Aug 10

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

I'd also add that if a desert recipe states a particular type of cream, it's normally because of the fat content needed.  For example in the UK single cream is 18% fat, double cream is 48% fat and whipping cream is 35% fat.  So if you're going to substitue say double cream for something else, be careful that the fat content isn't too low, as you could have disasterous result, as I know to my cost yikes

Kye, I didn't know that you could whip creme fraiche, great tip thanks!

We also make frozen yoghurt in the summer, and use little individual ice lolly moulds, they make a really good alternative to ice cream, and they're healthier! thumbsup

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#7 Wed 09 Feb 11 11:42pm

cengland

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From Darwin, Australia
Member since Wed 08 Sep 10

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

Creme fraiche and fromage frais aren't readily available in Australia.  I tend always to have light sour cream in the fridge, so I use that instead of creme fraiche.  Good brands of yoghurt are easy to get, and I use it when I have it.  But sometimes I substitute the light sour cream for yoghurt (maybe with a bit of lemon juice added), because it's what I have in the house, rather than yoghurt.  If a recipe calls for fromage frais, I'd substitute low-fat cream cheese.

As Kye said, a lower-fat dairy product (like yoghurt, and especially a low-fat yoghurt) is best added right at the end of cooking, off the heat, because it will curdle when heated unless stabilized by mixing with some flour or cornflour.

What BritFinn said about cream.  In Australia we also have a lot of 'thickened cream' in the shops; it's cream with gelatine added to thicken it a bit.

Freezing dairy products like these just as they are bought doesn't really work.  They tend to split or separate, so that you sort of end up with the texture of curds and whey.  It's OK if you're going to use it in baking or something, but not very good if you want it for a sauce or a dollop on the side of food.

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#8 Wed 09 Feb 11 11:47pm

Mr Grumpy

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From Coventry
Member since Sat 22 Dec 07

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

To add to BritFinn's comments above, be particularly careful about substituting "low fat" versions of any of the above.  Thay tend to curdle more easily when added to a hot dish.  If for dietary or other reasons you need to use low fat products, just allow the dish to cool a lot more befor adding them and then VERY CAREFULLY reheat.

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#9 Thu 10 Feb 11 7:54am

falconcy

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Occupation Project Manager
From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Cream, fromage frias, creme fraiche, or yoghurt???

We can't get creme fraiche and fromage frais over here. I normally sub out the russian style sour cream for creme fraiche and a russian cream cheese for fromage frais.

I did see some small jars of creme fraiche once (along with clotted cream) and the price was the kind that invokes a sharp intake of breath and at roughly 3-4 times the price I normally pay for the russian stuff. I somehow think I will not be using those any time soon.

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