Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Sun 25 Sep 11 12:34pm

falconcy

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From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Beef Dripping

If I understand right, the way the Beef Dripping that is sold in the UK gets made is by rendering down Beef Fat and ladling off the liquid - at least that is the way it used to be made in the old days.

I'm certain I can get my hands on Beef Fat from my local friendly butcher who would throw it away anyway. I have the right gear to render it down and I'm guessing I could make enough to fill up a deep fat fryer.

The best Chips were always cooked in Beef Dripping - same goes for Fish - that should take homemade Fish and Chips to a whole new level. This should reduce our dependance on commercially produced oils which I suspect are not really that good for us (good Olive Oil excepted - we have a good supply of cold-pressed EVOO anyway)

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#2 Sun 25 Sep 11 12:52pm

mummza

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Re: Beef Dripping

Yes fish and chis were traditionally cooked in beef dripping and the Harry Ramsden chain I beleive used to d this but I have just read that they now use oils to fry the chips.

When I fry chips at home (rare occasion ) I use sunflower oil , I would never use beef dripping .
Oil is easy to strain when cool and remove any deposits .

Beef dripping whilst some people find it deicious , is not the best thing for your arteries ( or waistline ) , it is a saturated fat . It is regarded as less healthy.
It does however add flavor .

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#3 Sun 25 Sep 11 1:59pm

falconcy

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From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Beef Dripping

I'm not really sure that mass-produced heavily refined oils are actually any healthier. Compare our locally sourced Extra Virgin Olive Oil which went from the tree to the mill and comes in any bottle they had handy at the time, where we know the person we got it from to the commercially produced stuff in the supermarkets and it's no competition.

I've gone through the fat-phobic era and to be honest, much of the commercially produced stuff they replaced traditional synthetic fats are far worse and I'm no longer convinced that dripping is as bad as it was made out to be, the same goes for butter. Most of it was merely a marketing exercise to sell us cheap rubbish with a much higher profit margin.

In reality we need a balanced diet, that much is true. Dietitians have jumped on  various bandwagons over the years and I'm not convinced anymore that they are right. As far as junk food goes, the biggest issues came about with the introduction of American junk food into the equation - remember the UK before plastic mac's or pizza whatever arrived on the High Street, when fish and chips were cooked in dripping and came in newspaper? Obesity rates were much lower then, so was heart disease.  The other culprit could well be the high sugar pop as well as the synthetically sweetened stuff pretending to be "diet".

Over here, we still get kebabs and gyros made the way they always were. According to current thinking, these would be considered bad, yet it's only been since the introduction of commercial fast food that obesity rates have risen.

Apparently in Australia a company has been making Gourmet Dripping from Wagyu Beef. Flavor wise it's supposed to be really good.

Traditional French cooking has always used natural fats, they too did not have an obesity epidemic.

I just had a nibble of a Roast Potato cooked in Goose Fat - the taste is far superior to anything cooked in oil. The Yorkie Puds are being cooked in Lard - nothing comes even close. People we've had round for Sunday Lunch always comment on how good it tastes.

I'm by no means advocating a diet of deep fried everything, we need to embrace all cooking methods though using the more traditional methods and ingredients.

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#4 Sun 25 Sep 11 3:01pm

MsPablo

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Re: Beef Dripping

I have heard that lard is better than shortening.  It's not as artery-clogging in dishes such as tamales where the fat is meant to go through the ingredients, not end up remaining in the part one eats.  I don't really know about beef fat.

A new supermarket chain in our area sells things like a bag of beef bones.  They had containers of chicken livers.  That's not unusual for our stores, but they stocked more of them so I bet they also carry schmaltz (chicken fat).  I may have to make chicken liver pate this Christmas.

My microbiologist friend says that eating just one french fry is as unhealthy as smoking a cigarette.  lol

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#5 Sun 25 Sep 11 5:06pm

falconcy

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Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Beef Dripping

I do think we need to differentiate between a chip and a "french fry" MsP. One is made from a cut piece of potato, the other is some kind of "regurgitated" starch that has been artificially flavored and shaped.

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#6 Sun 25 Sep 11 5:23pm

MsPablo

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Re: Beef Dripping

In American English, we don't use the word 'chip' for french fries, whether they are cut from fresh potatoes and cooked as the French do it, which is how I like them best or whether they are made from forming mashed potato and starch or whatever.

Typically, even our frozen fries are nothing more than just cut potatoes and ascorbic acid.  Although they are not as tasty as making them fresh, it's not really that bad of a convenience product here.  The unhealthy part of the dish is deep frying and of course, potatoes are a refined starch.

Last edited by MsPablo (Sun 25 Sep 11 5:49pm)

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#7 Sun 25 Sep 11 6:02pm

mummza

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Re: Beef Dripping

To me , in the UK ....
french fries
http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?q=french … &ty=28
(long and very narrow , made from potato and deep fried )

chips...
http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?q=chips& … &ty=40
( made from cut potatoes , deep fried and much chinkier than french fries )

Crisps..
http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?q=crisps … &ty=95
( very thin slices cut from potato and fried )

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#8 Sun 25 Sep 11 6:19pm

MsPablo

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Re: Beef Dripping

Thank you mummza.  That perfectly cleared up my confusion.  We call 'chips' thick fries or if they were shallow-fried, we'd call them home-fries.  I am not sure if we call deep-fried chips home-fries, maybe someone else knows.

We made homemade deep-fried French fries, cut from fresh potatoes that looked just like the ones in your French Fry photo when I was growing up.  They're best twice deep fried, which I learned later in the home of my family member's French relative who so kindly prepared one of the best meals I've ever eaten and then gave me her recipes and tricks for the main meal.  The main course was roast leg of lamb, French green beans, perfect French fries.

I suppose, we were not as fond of the thick fries or home-fries.  That may be because they are a little trickier to make well and sometimes they'd come out too mushy.

Last edited by MsPablo (Sun 25 Sep 11 6:20pm)

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#9 Sun 25 Sep 11 6:45pm

Kye

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Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Beef Dripping

Beef dripping, please excuse me but i had in view a Boeuf with a weak bladder neutral

We fry Frites tongue (almost never, cannot remember the last time)...

Goose fat, duck fat, chicken fat, olive oil are used at home. Chunky slices of potato are browned crispy in the oven with a little duck fat.



Otherwise 'chips' are crisps lol

Last edited by kye in france (Sun 25 Sep 11 7:04pm)

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#10 Sun 25 Sep 11 9:34pm

MsPablo

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Re: Beef Dripping

A favorite for us was to have freshly cut waffle-fries served outdoors in a Paris cafe with drinks as a late afternoon snack.  This isn't something we ate often, but for me, there is nothing better than a great french fry once-in-a-while.

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