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#11 Tue 21 Feb 12 11:54am

Kye

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Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: British<->American

I thought that scallions were some kind of shelled fish.



French toast = Bread pudding wink  smile

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#12 Tue 21 Feb 12 12:03pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
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Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: British<->American

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#13 Tue 21 Feb 12 1:20pm

MsPablo

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Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: British<->American

-Cornstarch doesn't equal cornflour.  Cornstarch is 100% pure corn starch, no wheat; from what I understand, British cornflour is a fine wheat, something like Wondra flour

We use both terms scallions or spring onions in the U.S.

Coriander is the term we use in the U.S. for the plant or seed, easy to grasp that fresh coriander means cilantro.

American jam, jelly and preserves = British what, jam?  Do you not use those distinctions and what are those qualities that make something jam versus jelly?

British 'Pudding = American 'dessert'
British 'Custard' = American 'pudding'
British 'Biscuit' = American 'Cookie'
American Biscuit = British 'scone-like breads'

Last edited by MsPablo (Tue 21 Feb 12 2:08pm)

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#14 Tue 21 Feb 12 1:31pm

falconcy

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Occupation Project Manager
From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: British<->American

French: Entree = Starter
US: Entree = Main Course

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#15 Tue 21 Feb 12 2:12pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: British<->American

jam..
http://www.google.co.uk/search?tbm=isch … l181l3l3l0

jelly ( what in America is Jello )
http://www.dezeen.com/2008/07/22/archit … n-results/

or jelly !
http://squirrelslarder.wordpress.com/20 … lli-jelly/
( a seedless preserve !})

both the jam and jelly that you spread on bread are sometimes called preserve !

Last edited by mummza (Tue 21 Feb 12 2:18pm)

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#16 Tue 21 Feb 12 4:22pm

falconcy

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Occupation Project Manager
From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: British<->American

mummza wrote:

both the jam and jelly that you spread on bread are sometimes called preserve !

....or if they are citrus based they can also be called marmalade.

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#17 Tue 21 Feb 12 4:28pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: British<->American

Marmalade is a bit different as its made from the juices and the peel from the cutrus fruit . But it does get called a preserve.

Jam is usually made from the whole fruit

Jelly is made from fruit juice

and then of course there are the fruit cheeses that are made from the whole fruit that has been seived to give a paste like texture and this is then added to the sugar and boiled.

and the curds which are made with butter and egg !!

Last edited by mummza (Tue 21 Feb 12 4:29pm)

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#18 Tue 21 Feb 12 4:34pm

MsPablo

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Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: British<->American

We use the terms curd and marmalade the same way, but I believe we'd call fruit cheese, a fruit paste - guava paste, quince paste or membrillo.

Some here, my father call hazelnuts filberts.

Last edited by MsPablo (Tue 21 Feb 12 4:38pm)

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#19 Tue 21 Feb 12 5:57pm

Pakman

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From Estonia
Member since Tue 06 Oct 09

Re: British<->American

My addled merican brain considers jam a preserve but not jelly even though it is.
Jelly is not jello though Jello is a brand name. Jelly is something you put on your PB and J not something from a mould most likely containing some sort of canned fruit salad  puke .

Apple butter now there's a fruit substance to get on your bread under!

Bubble and squeak, nipps and tatties, bangers ?? think

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#20 Tue 21 Feb 12 6:00pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: British<->American

filberts.. yes I konw that name as well , we had a neighbour that used to say fliberts for the cobnuts !
I always just thought it was a variety of hazlenut .

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