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#31 Tue 29 Jan 13 9:00am

Thistledo

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Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Burns Night!

Never known it to be eaten cold mummza.  Wouldn't fancy it myself but then I'm not Scots  wink
I prefer picnic pie slightly warm, that's why I think haggis would work.

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#32 Tue 29 Jan 13 9:48am

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Burns Night!

Not easy to take off on a picnic warm .
Will have to try making a small pie and feeding it to a haggis loving freind to see if its acceptable cold  !!!

My haggis loving freind eats Haggis quite a lot ,I have noticed that  she always microwaves it hot .

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#33 Tue 29 Jan 13 10:52am

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Burns Night!

mummza, I don't often take this pie on a picnic but enjoy it at home.  Just remember to try and eat it on the same day as making.  Don't like it straight out of the fridge.  Then, I don't like most things straight of the fridge.

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#34 Tue 29 Jan 13 7:14pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Burns Night!

I wouldn't eat haggis cold, and I've never heard of anyone else doing it either. Too suety. I love suet, but not cold.

Cold lard, now, that's another matter...

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#35 Tue 29 Jan 13 10:04pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
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Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Burns Night!

thats sort of what I thought hippytea.

would Haggis work in a pie ?
I have never tried haggis myself .

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#36 Tue 29 Jan 13 10:08pm

hippytea

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Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Burns Night!

I think so. It might have a tendency to be dry, as it is not "gravy-like". It's soft and rich in fat, but relatively dry. You might need to add some kind of gravy or sauce.

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#37 Tue 29 Jan 13 10:13pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Burns Night!

ok , so the type of pasty used might have to be something other that shortcrust then, I was thinking shortcrust pastry might give a nice texture.

I am not sure I will make a pie unless I could find someone who would eat it but its nice to know. thumbsup

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#38 Tue 29 Jan 13 10:44pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Burns Night!

I think shortcrust would be a nice texture for it. You could probably just add an onion gravy on top of the haggis.

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#39 Wed 30 Jan 13 12:33am

@nGoose1

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Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: Burns Night!

Haggis Scotch egg? I know a Manchester one exists, using Black pudding. Enjoy your picnic. I hope the weather is nice.

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#40 Wed 30 Jan 13 10:11am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Burns Night!

I vaguely remember the original Scotch eggs contained haggis - a mix of haggis and sausagemeat, perhaps? - and that that was why they were called that.

Haggis does not bind on its own, as it is always pre-cooked. If you want to form it into anything like Scotch egg or meatballs, you need to mix in an egg to make it stick to itself. A bit of flour helps, too. Or if you mixed it with sausagemeat or mince, that would bind it.

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