Jamie Oliver

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#1 Sun 14 Apr 13 9:53pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

How do you cook an Omelette ?

There is a TV show on each week and for part of the show there is an Omelette Challange between 2 visiting chefs.
The aim is to see who can cook an omelette the quickest .

I have to say that that this irritates me so much as most of the omelettes cooked are really quite badly cooked.
I am sure that there are loads of veiwers who genuinly think that this is the way to cook an olelette .

I have noticed that many chefs seem to scramble the eggs in the frypan with a fork then spread them out just before they set.

Is this the way you cook an omelette at home ?

The way the tv chefs cook the Omelette is not the way that I was taught by my Grandmother who used to gently draw the beaten egg in towards the center of the pan the setting egg and in so dooing create soft very thin folds of egg , she would work her way delicatly around the pan continue to draw in the egg untill it was almost set .
It woukd be then rolled onto a plate , as it rolled it folded onto 3 ( so folded over then over again) it would end in a long thinish shape on the plate and the exterior of the omelette would still be pale.
the omelette was always soft and light to eat.

Last edited by mummza (Sun 14 Apr 13 9:54pm)

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#2 Sun 14 Apr 13 10:20pm

Ashen

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Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

it depends on the type of omelette you are going for Mummza..    Jaques Pepin has some really good videos where he demonstrates the techniques for different styles of omlettes .  french style which is rolled out of the pan or country style  which is similar to what you are talking about  and is folded out

http://youtu.be/57afEWn-QDg


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#3 Sun 14 Apr 13 10:31pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

The rolled out of the pan omelete is what Im talking about Ashen , I tried to explain how it sort of folds into 3 as it rolls out.

British omelettes are generally folded over into 2 so you end up with a semi circle shaped omelette.

Thanks for posting the link , I will try to look at it tomorrow.

I did have a flatmate once who used to cook the omelette on one side then grill it tso that it puffed up.

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#4 Sun 14 Apr 13 10:51pm

Grandmadamada

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Member since Fri 19 Nov 10

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

I'm tempted to make one sometimes, rolling it in the pan, but I always prefer a frittata, because I like eggs well cooked, even in the carbonara pasta sauce, the video is interesting Ashen, ciao mummza big_smile

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#5 Mon 15 Apr 13 11:26am

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

Yes, I watch Saturday Kitchen religously.  I think you should take the omelette contest with a pinch of salt - pardon the pun.  It's just a piece of light entertainment.  I've never once seen an omelette cooked in that fashion that I would be pleased with.  I don't think for a moment that most people take it seriously.
Yes, I push it around a bit until all the egg is almost cooked but prefer it folded in half, rather than like a pancake, in threes.  We like souffle omelette, where you finish it under the grill.  Much lighter.

Last edited by Thistledo (Mon 15 Apr 13 11:27am)

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#6 Mon 15 Apr 13 11:30am

oliviascotland

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From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

I make omelettes in a very similar way to your grandmother, Mummza.  I was always taught to make sure that the butter is foaming when the eggs go into the pan, then to move it to a lower (although not low) heat, and draw the edges into the middle until it's nearly set - then to add any fillings, and fold out onto a plate - although I generally always end up with it folded in half rather than thirds!

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#7 Mon 15 Apr 13 1:33pm

mummza

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Occupation avoiding housework
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Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

I know that the ommelet challange of that TV show is all a set-up Thistledo , but I am sure that there are many people who watch the show who genuinly think that as omelette is cooked by there erratic methods.
It just irritates me so much.

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#8 Mon 15 Apr 13 2:16pm

Maree

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From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

And, I was taught to add water. Not milk etc. (Sorry to bring up that old chestnut again). Butter does not pay a star role here so no foaming butter.
Omelettes get folded once to make a semi-circle in my hands.
Pancakes (echoing the Shrove Tuesday discussion) are approximately 7.5cm/3" in diameter. They don't /can't get folded.
Flapjacks are the same size as pancakes. The batter is thicker. They contain no oats (here).
Soufflé pancakes are delicious but are strictly reserved for "special occasions" here. Same for waffles.
Crepes are folded (into 1/4's to look like cones) or sometimes (but not here) into a tubular shape.

Discuss ... wink big_smile.

Last edited by Maree (Mon 15 Apr 13 2:18pm)


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#9 Mon 15 Apr 13 5:20pm

wine~o

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Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

folded twice surely...

I loved the episode of saturday kitchen where Raymond Blanc took his time over the omelette challenge (Took all of 1 minute and a bit) and then shaved a little truffle over it..

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#10 Mon 15 Apr 13 11:57pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: How do you cook an Omelette ?

Maree wrote:

And, I was taught to add water. Not milk etc. (Sorry to bring up that old chestnut again). Butter does not pay a star role here so no foaming butter.
Omelettes get folded once to make a semi-circle in my hands.
Pancakes (echoing the Shrove Tuesday discussion) are approximately 7.5cm/3" in diameter. They don't /can't get folded.
Flapjacks are the same size as pancakes. The batter is thicker. They contain no oats (here).
Soufflé pancakes are delicious but are strictly reserved for "special occasions" here. Same for waffles.
Crepes are folded (into 1/4's to look like cones) or sometimes (but not here) into a tubular shape.

Discuss ... wink big_smile.

No water of milk in the omelettes that I make Maree .
Butter to cook the omelette but not foaming as i was taught that omelette should not brown .

I never make soufflé omelettes , I an not keen on the texture of them.

British pancakes are thicker than the French crepes and mostly tend to be rolled.

The bakers shops in Wales often sell packets of pancakes these are similar to the scotch pancake or drop scone, and not as thick and cake like as the American pancake. They have often been sprinkles with raisins or sultanas whilst the first side is cooking so that the dried fruits set into the cooking mixture.

Crepes is what I generally make , lovely thin pancakes that like Maree I fold into quarters , but my family still like them rolled !

Flapjacks to me are baked , they are made from rolled oats , golden syrup and butter cooked in a baking tray with sides then marked (by pressing the knife rather than cutting through ) into squares or bar shapes before they are fully cooled . These then cut easily when a lot fully cooled.

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