forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Fri 23 Feb 07 9:52am

olie

Member
Occupation artist
From Kosice
Member since Mon 18 Sep 06

Explore oils

Hi everybody,

good olive oil is essential in Jamie cooking and once I tired home hand-made olive oil in Thassos (Greece) I can say that there can be a huge difference in tastes of 100% pure virgin olive oils. So, I treat myself and each summer I bring from Greece or Italy some litres of olive oil made in old-fashioned way. Olive oil was the beginning of my passion.
Nowadays you will find in my kitchen also natural 100% pure sesame oil -great for Asian cooking, walnut oil - excellent for spinach, salads, pasta, avocado oil, hazelnut oil - dressings, salads, corn oil ...  I can really get wild with oils. You can mix them, but be careful...simple tastes better! They are great for any salads, pasta dishes, steamed veggies, ...you can play with the taste. It is simple to flavour them. I usually have in the fridge a jar with sun dried tomatoes soaking in some nice tasting oil. You can soak in them garlic, herbs, feta cheese, peppers.
With good quality oil a lunch dish can be just this simple... some great cooked pasta, good oil... my favourite at the moment is Carapelli - Olys and sesame seeds on the top. That's it! Simple and fabulous! I just recently discovered that my local supermarket have in stock the Carapelli new oils. I have Olys - oil from cereal and fruit. But there is much more to be explored. Check your local store for some good oils and invest. It pays off.

Enjoy it,

Olie  smile

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#2 Fri 23 Feb 07 11:13am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: Explore oils

I have to agree with you Olie  .. Carapelli produces some really nice oils.. Their EX-Virgin olive oil is very nice and i love their Grapeseed oil. Nice light fresh  tasting oil for salads with ingredients that might be overpowered by ex-virgin olive oil. T


The Universe is alive and self aware. 
Need proof?
Look in a mirror.
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#3 Fri 23 Feb 07 12:34pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Explore oils

macadameia (spelling?) oil makes nice salad dressings

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#4 Fri 23 Feb 07 1:01pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Explore oils

Yes, using the right oil produces the best results.

I too keep a good stock of oils and vinegars to hand:

Olive oils
   Extra Virgin - for dressings and sauces
   Light - for shallow frying and cooking
   Pomace - for deep frying
Sunflower - general frying
Grapeseed - frying & dressing
Rapeseed - frying
Groundnut - stirfrying
Coconut - frying (South Asian)
Palm - frying, Asian
Mustard frying and pickles - North Indian
Walnut - dressing & croutons
Hazelnut - dressing & croutons
Avocado - dressing & salsa, South American
Toasted Sesame - flavouring - Chnia & South Asia

I also make Chilli oil and lemon oil and herb oils, all with olive oil base.

As well as oils, I also keep a range of fats:-
butter (unsalted and salted
Lard (pig fat)
Dripping (beef fat)
Duck fat

And vinegars:-

Malt
Distilled
Pickling
White Wine
Red Wine
Sherry
Balsamic
Cider
Rice
Sushi (flavoured rice)
Various flavoured vinegars

I always try tobuy the best (which isn't always the most expensive). By keeping a good range in stock, it means that I rarely have to buy anything special for any recipes I find.

Of course, is necessary to store things well - (cool dark cupboard), and observe "best before" and "use by", but oils generally have at least a 6 month shelf life - and rarely last that long in my kitchen smile

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#5 Fri 23 Feb 07 1:30pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Explore oils

Geoff, how much room do you have in your kitchen? I have enough room for an olive oil, canola oil (can't remember why) and a garlic olive oil. And the first one has to sit on the bench. And this kitchen is twice the size of my last.

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#6 Fri 23 Feb 07 3:19pm

olie

Member
Occupation artist
From Kosice
Member since Mon 18 Sep 06

Re: Explore oils

Thanks for sharing... I am impressed... especially with size of Geoff stock 
smile

Just to add...some oils can be also used on skin... or add into the bath  whistle

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#7 Fri 23 Feb 07 3:24pm

Chanr

Forum champ
From Melbourne
Member since Mon 14 Mar 05

Re: Explore oils

I have recently trialed a bottle of ricebran oil with good results. It's been marketed for it's low cholestrol level, but it also has a very high smoking point. The flavour is extremely suttle so it's pretty much tasteless, making it good for frying, as a substitute for butter in muffins..etc

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#8 Fri 23 Feb 07 4:06pm

itsdanny

Member
Occupation Web Gimp
From W Yorks
Member since Mon 14 Aug 06

Re: Explore oils

Can i just point out that plantations used to make palm oil have replaced rainforest in such places as Borneo etc, i certainly won't be buying any more.
Dan

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#9 Fri 23 Feb 07 9:04pm

bcrain

Forum champ
Occupation Duty Free Lancome and Fragrance sales
From Greater Vancouver
Member since Mon 23 Oct 06

Re: Explore oils

I don't have that extent of oils but use different ones for differnt purposes. I actually learnt a few things from many people here about oils and changed a few things, yup, they were right!

I take my grapeseed oil to my massage therapist because I don't want him using mineral oil on me anymore. He even mentioned a few times how much he likes using it. You can use it all over actually, I have another portion in the bathroom which I mix with essential oils. It's nice on the face too as it's slightly astringent. wink

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#10 Fri 23 Feb 07 10:47pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Explore oils

My kitchen is much smaller than I would really like.

Previously, I had a 15ft sq kitchen, with a butlers pantry (15 x 6), and a laundry (15 x 9) attached - and wine cellar below. It had  solid fuel Rayburn, and a gas oven.

Now I am reduced to a mere 12x9, and just one cooker. my first job whenwe arrived here was to add a second tier of cupboards above tge exusting wall cupboards. Even so, I am pushed for space, and have to keep cookbooks in the dining room, and the second freezer in an outhouse, while the wine has to live under tge stairs.

We'll be moving again this year, and one ofmy requirements is a decent sized kitchen and a winecellar - and utility room if I can manage it.

I do have to exercise some ingenuity to fittings in - for instance, my spice racks are built into the space between the first and second tier of the wall cupboards, which gives me about 18ft of shelving for spices - arranged alphabetically from Allspice to Za'atar. oils live in baskets in a cupboard, as do vinegars, Differentflours in one cupboard, dry pastas, mushrooms, tomato, and seaweed in another. One cupboard is dedicated to driec pulses, different rices and nuts. A wide cupboard accomodates prepared sauces (soys, fish, anchovy, mushroom, Worcestershitre, sweet chilli, hot chilli etc. etc. etc.. Then there is the pickle & chutney cupboard, the jam & fruit preserves cupboard, and the cupboard for the tinned tomato, tinned tuna & other fish, and other tinned goods cupboard (only basic ingredients, of course).

Some rarely used utensils live in the upper cupboards, but the fresh stuff kives in the fridge or on the vegetable racks (on wheels). Frozen stuff intge freezer, of course, andbulk fozen stuff in the big freezer in the outhouse,

On the other side of the kitchen, the upper cupboards contain the glasses, cups, mugs, soup bowls, jugs, bowls etc. Top cupboards have bulk supplies - cereals, large containers of oil/vinegar etc. This sidem is restricted by the cooker, cooker hood and salamander grill.

Bottom cupboards all the way round contain the heavier & larger utensils, and the sets of crockery. Of course ,space is also taken up with the dishwasher, washing machine, fridge & cooker.

Knves and 8tyer utensils live in a rack I built myself to accommodate them all, while cutlery lives in one drawer, small utensils in another, tea towels and hand towels and cleaning cloths and string in other drawers.

Even the space under the cabinets is used - I've made shallow drawers with wheels to replace the plinths.

When I think about it, I have built the kitchens in every house we have lived in - from the smallest to the largest. It is quite amazing what you can fit in if you try!

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