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#1 Thu 07 Oct 04 9:17am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

The Silk Road

Hello everyone, welcome to the Silk Road, a haven for all food lovers and those passionate about cooking good quality food for friends, family and loved ones.

Being half Shanghai-nese, I am very proud of my roots and hold fast to the tradition of cooking from the heart.
Being born and raised in Singapore just equates to natural greed because Singaporeans are united by one thing.... FOOD!

So if you have any queries on Asian food,..whether Chinese, Malay, Thai or Singaporean, fire away!


big_smile

Last edited by Stefanie (Thu 30 Apr 09 5:24pm)

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#2 Thu 07 Oct 04 9:30am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Stefanie (Big Wave!),
Glad to see you started this topic. Please enlighten me with more of your authentic Chinese and Thai recipes. Like I wrote to you before, I soooooooo enjoy this type of food and want to learn more about it. Thanks in advance! BTW, did your Dad enjoy the Rocky Road?

Kind Regards,
Miami  smile

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#3 Thu 07 Oct 04 10:33am

figgy

Member
From western autralia
Member since Wed 29 Sep 04

Re: The Silk Road

hi stephanie and thanks for your offer, i LOVE asian food but some of it is a bit of a mystery without help!!

can you tell me, do you make lotus paste or buy it as paste?  i would love a recipe for those sensational lotus paste moon cakes!!!  the ones i like the best are made with a glutinous rice flour skin outside and heaps of lotus paste inside, phwooooaaaarrrr!!

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#4 Thu 07 Oct 04 10:41am

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Stefanie ;-)!

That would be lovely! I really enjoy trying Asian food (in the restaurant and homemade) but then I don't really know how original the things are you can get in Europe... or how traditional the recipes are...?

Eg there are tons of stir-fry recipes to be found but nothing much else... But one of the recipes I liked best was strips of pork belly simmered for ages (2-3 hours) in soy + other sauces/stock with star anise until very tender. Is this something you would typically cook, or just European imagination of Asian cuisine??

Oh and another question - at a sechuan (?sp) restaurant I had a lovely dish of big slices of aubergine which very very tender and quite spicy (seem to have been cooked with different herbs, chili and soy sauce and ...) and tofu. They had a caramelised look (dark red/brown). I tried recreating it but no chance! Do you have any recipe for something like that??

Many thanks in advance ;-)

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#5 Thu 07 Oct 04 12:06pm

figgy

Member
From western autralia
Member since Wed 29 Sep 04

Re: The Silk Road

hi stephanie me again, do you have any recipes for hun kwee??  i think in english it's mung bean flour and i use it to make sort of moulded custards. do you know any other uses?

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#6 Thu 07 Oct 04 8:30pm

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Stefanie,  smile
I have already tried some of the recipes you posted. So different from the norm and delicious! I pretty much like all food, and am always willing to try new things. So, surprise me with like recipes, that your grandma , mom, and ones you've come up with for Chinese, Thai, and Malay dishes. Take care Stefanie!

Kind Regards,
Mary In Miami

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#7 Fri 08 Oct 04 4:15pm

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hey Mary...(BIG HUGE WAVE)...
My dad loved the rocky road...man did he have to work out at the gym to burn off all those calories! Glad you tried out those recipes...here's another one to leave with you...its Peranakan (Nonya) with Malay and chinese influences. Its called Babi Pong Tay, namely stewed pork.
You need:
600 gm pork shoulder/ belly pork
150 gm bamboo shoots, sliced on 1/2cm thick, blanched in hot boiling water for 30 seconds.
15-20 dried chinese mushrooms, soaked in hot water for an hour at least.
2 stalks (20cm roughly each) sugar cane
1 tbsp salted soya beans paste (a caramel colour, available in chinese supermarkets)
8 cloves garlic, 5 cloves shallots, peeled
3-4 tbsp thick dark soy sauce
1 heaped tbsp sugar
2 cups water
2 cloves, 2cm length cinnamon stick
2 tbsp peanut oil
4 green chillies

HOW:
Cut the pork into cubes
Pound garlic and shallots
Halve each sugar cane, split each half in 2
Discard mushroom stalks, drain soaking liquid
In a smoking hot wok, saute bean paste in oil, add garlic and shallots, fry till crispy.
Brown pork, turn down heat to prevent bean paste mix from burning.
Add bamboo shoots and mushrooms, stir fry till fragrant, at least 3 minutes.
Add soy sauce, sugar,spices, sugar cane and water
Bring to the boil, turn down and simmer for 2 hours. Remove sugar cane, stir in chopped chillies serve over plenty of steamed rice and a simplesalad of shredded chillies, cucumber, fresh pineapple chunks dressed with a little rice vinegar, sugar and pineapple juice.
DELISH!

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#8 Fri 08 Oct 04 4:27pm

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi figgy...you're in luck!
My mum and I make mooncakes for our Mid-Autumn festival every year, here's my grandma's recipe.

500g lotus seeds (seong lin)
1 1/2 tbsp lye water (kan sui)
340ml peanut oil
450g sugar
1 tbsp maltose
1 tbsp kao fun (cooked glutinous rice flour)
Method:
Add lye water into lotus seeds, mix well and leave aside for 20 minutes. Pour in boiling water and cover up for 20-30 minutes. Strain and wash the lotus seeds to remove the skin.
Boil lotus seeds till soft. Put them into a blender with some water and blend into a thick paste.
Heat wok with a quarter portion of oil and a quarter portion of sugar. When sugar turns light brown, put in blended lotus paste and the remaining sugar. Stir constantly until paste is smooth and thick in consistency. Add in the rest of the oil gradually. Keep stirring the paste until thick. Lastly, stir in maltose and stir well to blend.
Sieve in 1 tbsp kao fun for a thicker and firmer consistency in the paste. Leave overnight before use.

Pastry:
Water-Shortening Dough:
2 cups flour
5 tablespoons lard
10 tablespoons water
1/4 teaspoon salt
Flaky Dough:
1 cup flour
5 tablespoons lard

Directions: Mix ingredients for the water-shortening dough and the flaky dough separately until smooth. Divide each dough into 20 equal portions. Wrap one portion of flaky dough inside each portion of water-shortening dough. Roll out each piece of dough, then fold in thirds to form three layers. Roll out again, and once more fold in thirds to form three layers.
Flatten each piece of dough with the palm of your hand to form a 3inch circle. Place one portion of filling in the center (about a ping pong ball-full) Gather the edges to enclose the filling and pinch to seal. Place the filled packet in the mold, gently pressing to fit. Invert and remove the mold.Arrange mooncakes on a baking sheet. Bake 20 minutes at 350 degrees. Let cool before serving.
Figgy...Making mooncakes is fairly complicated, and this recipe uses two doughs that are folded and rolled together in a manner similar to French puff pastry. Also, the mooncakes are formed in a special decorative aluminum mold and stamped with a Chinese cookie-design stamp, which might be available in better-stocked Chinese kitchenware stores. If necessary, you could substitute a miniature Bundt pan or fluted brioche pan and a Western cookie-design stamp. So go slow...try and try to succeed! Good luck...enjoy the mooncakes!

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#9 Fri 08 Oct 04 4:38pm

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hey...woah...interesting name...maybe your fav song is Lady In Red? Hahaha...anyway, the pork dish you are talking about, is traditional Hokkien (****) dish my mum always makes, its called Tau Yew Bak. Here's the recipe!
For us Chinese, we poach/simmer tougher cuts of meat (pork mostly) in a mix of dark soy sauce, sugar,garlic cloves, peppercorns, a bit of star anise and tangerine peel, and five spice powder. Before adding the pork, fry the spices & garlic in hot peanut oil to get the flavours going, add the sugar to carmelise then pour in the dark soy sauce. Ooh I tell you...after an hour or two of poaching, you get wondefully tender meat and a fragrant liquid to drizzle over rice. Sometimes, my mum adds belly pork (with fat on it) and we eat it as a sort of sandwich in steamed buns, topped with shredded cucumber and chilli garlic sauce...delish!
That...was the recipe I posted on the topic of poaching by Mary in Miami. You can do the same thing with pork belly strips.

Let me tell you why the eggplant was so good...it was DEEP FRIED! *horrors* Haha...its szechuan cooking...very spicy tho!
Buy the long variety of eggplant, slice it at an angle, deep fry in very hot oil till browned and softened. Drain and set aside.
Soak 2 dried szechuan chillies, seed it if u can't take the heat, chop roughly,
In a hot wok, saute 2 cloves minced garlic, 1 tsp minced ginger, chopped coriander, spring onions and the dried chilli. Add some hot szechuan bean paste and 1 tbsp thick dark soy sauce. Check seasoning, add some sugar. Pour in 1/4 cup chicken stock, gently slide in some cubed chinese silken tofu, simmer away for 2-3 minutes.
In your serving dish, pour over the eggplant and serve with rice.
This is a vegetarian variety, if you want meat, fry some minced pork with the garlic mix before adding the stock.
Enjoy!

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#10 Fri 08 Oct 04 4:48pm

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hey....mung bean flour is traditionally used in Nonya/Peranakan cooking, essentially a fusion of chinese and malay influences. Try this dessert of a sticky rice cake with mung bean:

Ingredients :
DOUGH:
1 and half cup rice flour, 1 cup mung bean flour .
1/2 Cup coconut milk .
1/2 Cup cold water.
1/2 Cup castor sugar.
1/2 Cup palm sugar.
Quarter Teaspoon salt.
1 Teaspoon vegetable oil.
FILLING:
12 oz Peeled mung bean.Washed and rinsed.
4 Cups water.
3 Tablespoons coconut.
1 Tablespoon pure vanilla extract.
Quarter Teaspoon salt.
1 Tablespoon cooking oil.
2 to 3 Packages frozen banana leaves or fresh banana leaves .

Procedures :
FILLING:
Put mung beans in a pot with 4 cups water and cook till it's tender.
Drained mung beans in a colander and set a side.
Heat up a non-stick skillet, when it is hot add 1 tablespoon cooking oil.
Saute cooked mung beans with coconut cream powder, vanilla and salt. Stirs well and set a side to cool down.
When the mung beans are cool to touch. Take a teaspoon of mung beans and places in a palm of hand, shape and roll it in to a small ball.
Continue until beans gone. You should have 14 balls. Set mung bean balls a side.
DOUGH:
Sieve flours into a large bowl, reserve half cup mung bean flour
Pour coconut milk and water on sweet rice flour. Mix well.
Add sugar, palm sugar, salt and cooking oil, and kneads by hands till dough smooth.
If dough sticky add a little more flour.
Flour dough should be smooth, firm and not stick to finger when touch.
Take out a small piece of dough, shape to round ball with your palms.
Then uses your fingers and shape flour dough to flat thin round sheet.
Take a mung bean ball put in the center of round dough sheet.
Gently pull dough over the mung bean ball to seal it.
Rolls and shape dough to a round ball by your palms and set aside.
Continue till the dough gone. Make 14 dough balls.

WRAPPING CAKES:
Cut banana leaf out to 28 pieces by 8x7 inches in size.
If you use frozen banana leaves, need to defrost it first.
Washed and wipe each pieces of leaf with paper towels. Set a side.
Lay one piece banana leaf flat on cutting board in length wide .
Take another piece banana leaf place on top in cross wide.
Pick up bottom ends of leaves fold over to form a triangle shape .
Folds over the end again to shape like a funnel.
Pick up the funnel and hold the pointed end in on of your palm.
Drop a dough ball in the funnel and press the leaf cover tightly over the mung beans ball.
Fold and tuck the bottom of leaf under to form a triangle shape, like a pyramid.
Tuck and fold over other 2 corners so that all 3 corner form in like a pyramid.
Adjust and tuck the bottom of the cake evenly at each side. Set aside and continue to wrap cakes until dough ball gone.
Places cakes in the steamer and steam it for 1 hour.
Serve warm or cold.
Note:  can keep in refrigerator for a week or in freezer for a month.
Just re-steam or re-heat in microwave till the dough soften before you eat.

Last edited by Stefanie (Mon 03 Nov 08 2:53pm)

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