forum: Food & Drink

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#11 Fri 08 Oct 04 4:59pm

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi...sorry that recipe I gave by accident was the traditional Vietnamese dessert recipe. Here's the peranakan one...Mung Bean pastries:

1/2   cup            Mung bean flour
3/4   cup            Sugar
2     drops          green food colouring
1/4   cup            Rice flour
3/4   cup            Coconut milk
1/2   tsp           Salt
2 tbsp           Yellow mung beans, optional

   In a large bowl, combine the mung bean flour, sugar,food colouring & 2 cups cold water.  Stir until the flour is almost dissolved.  Strain through cheesecloth into a pot.  Over medium heat, stir the liquid until all remaining solids are completely dissolved & the mixture is thick & sticky enough to coat a spoon.
Cool for 15 minutes. Cover a baking sheet with waxed paper.  Drop the mixture by the spoonful onto the sheet.  Do not allow the circles to touch.Let cool to room temperature. In a large bowl, combine the riceflour, milk & salt, stirring until dissolved.Strain into a pot & cook over medium heat for 10 minutes.
   Drop 1 tsp of this onto the cooling gelatin-like circles. In a dry skillet, toast the yellow mung beans until they turn light brown. Generously sprinkle onto the pastries & refrigerate for 1 hour before serving.
They will keep in the refrigerator for 2 or 3 days.

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#12 Fri 08 Oct 04 6:04pm

figgy

Member
From western autralia
Member since Wed 29 Sep 04

Re: The Silk Road

those recipes ar fantastic, i willl probably have to hunt for some of the lotus paste ingredients but it will definitely be worth it!!

i'll be able to try the mung bean recipes straight away though because those are all ingredients i have in the kitchen now. 

it's going to be a good weekend!!

stephanie you've already given me heaps of great recipes, but i have another request!!  [was it you who said being singaporean meant natural greed??  i think that might be me too, i don't think singaporeans have the monopoly on greed!!]

do you know how to make that soft, jellyish, ricey rainbow layer cake?  the mung bean pastries recipe in your last posting reminded me of it.

thankyou, thankyou, thankyou heaps stephanie!!  i wish i could send you some recipes in return, any boring old australian cuisine you wish you knew how to cook!?  ; )

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#13 Fri 08 Oct 04 7:02pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: The Silk Road

Thanks for the recipes Stefanie I'll certainly try them! Just hope I can find the szechuan bean paste (is there any alternative) but there are quite many chinese shops around now ;-) A new one just opend where they also have fresh veg - bought some lovely small bok choy(?sp) for tomorrow evening to go with a duck with chili and hoy sin sauce (I've loved hoysin sauce since I had crispy duck with small pan cakes, cucumber, spring onlion and hoysin sauce!)

As for LadyRed - I have had that nickname for quite some time (since school) ;-) because I've got red hair and my favourite colour is red and as I went to a school for computer studies I was nearly the only girl there --> therefor the lady of the class ;-) I didn't even know the song till afterwards...

Oh and may I ask another question. I recently bought fermented black beans but I only ever used them for one dish (stirfry with ginger, chili, those beans, chinese broccoli, beef). What else can I do with them?!

Hope I can help you sometimes too!

many greatings from Vienna

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#14 Fri 08 Oct 04 9:45pm

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Awesome recipe Stefanie, thank you! I'm glad to hear that your Dad liked the Rocky Road. Know what you mean about going to the gym.....lol. It's soooooooo good, though.
Stefanie, when I was in Singapore, I remember having these long greens(?). These tasted to be stir fried with garlic. What are these and how are they made exactly? Also, I had this incredible fish, it had little spots on it (I remember choosing it from a fish tank), they cooked it whole with soy and ginger, simply delicious. Would you have a recipe for that? I had various types of Thai soup that were delicious and comforting. Any that you can send my way, would be more than welcome.
I'm trying to think of what else I had there.....Everything I had was incredible. No bad experiences at all!
Stefanie, again I thank you for your time and consideration. As far as finding some of the ingredients.....no problem, where there is a will, there is a way. If there is any way that I can be of assistance to you, don't hesitate to ask.

Kind Regards,
Mary In Miami (Waving Bye Bye) big_smile

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#15 Fri 08 Oct 04 10:12pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Mary!

I know this is probably not typically chinese/or thai (?) but I really like this asian stile soup! And I'nm also looking forward to any recipe Stefanie has to add ;-) (thanks again :-)))

ginger soup with duck and asparagus
-----------------------------------

4 cloves garlic (2 pressed, 2 in thin strips)
fresh coriander
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1/2 - 1 tsp sambal olek
salt
1 duck breast, without skin, thinly sliced
aprox 10 pieces green asparagus, sliced
1 liter chicken stock
2-3 tbsp sesame oil
fresh thai basil
3 cm ginger/igwer cut into thin strips
2 spring onion, cut into thin strips

Mix minced garlic, honey, soy sauce, sambal olek, vinegar and chopped koriander to make a marinade for the duck slice. Mix and let stand for at least 30 min. Bring stock to simmering point and add ginger and garlic, let simmer for 10 min. Add asparagus and cook until al dente.
Add sprin onion and duck and serve ( you only need  to cook the meat for a few seconds). And serve with thai basil.

The recipe works also with beef instead of duck and snow beans (very thin green beans?) instead of asparagus. And to cook the chicken stock I also add a bit lemon grass.

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#16 Fri 08 Oct 04 11:13pm

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi LadyRed,
Thanks for the recipe! Duck and ginger, yum! I like asparagus as well. Sounds great, look forward to trying it.
I like the story behind your nick name, way cool.
I have a recipe for you, it's Duck and Sweet Corn Pozole with Foie Gras. It's a stewy/soup kind of dish. I'll post it in the Adult Elegant Dinner Party thread, with the rest of the foie recipes.
Hope all is smooth in Vienna!

Kind Regards,
Mary In Miami big_smile

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#17 Sat 09 Oct 04 3:32am

Oh Deb

Member
From Brisbane, Australia
Member since Sat 25 Sep 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Stefanie

I'm chasing the way to make a dessert.

It's a hot dessert with almondy like mouth sized balls in a milky liquid.  A friend told me that it is usually served at festival times in Singapore.

Have had a great time reading through your recipes . . . . now absolutely starving!!

Thank you
Deb

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#18 Sat 09 Oct 04 5:30am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Figgy...haha what a mouthful...put it as the subject for a laugh... big_smile
What you're talking about, is a Peranakan /Nonya cake called Kueh Lapis Beras. Pretty few ingredients but a bit fiddly to make, have the recipe but never had the courage to try it out myself! Here goes...
YOU NEED:
850ml coconut milk
340gm (12 oz) wet rice flour
(TO MAKE WET RICE FLOUR: add 15-17oz cold water to 22oz rice flour, stir till it forms a smooth paste. Use stipulated amount, freeze the rest, will keep for 2 months)
225gm sago/mung bean flour
quarter tsp salt
455gm coarse sugar
8 screwpine (pandan) leaves, knotted
Different shades of food colouring

HOW:
Sieve the flours & salt into the bowl, add the coconut milk a little at a time, blend till smooth. Set aside.
Boil the coarse sugar with 285ml water and the screwpine leaves for 10 minutes to make a syrup. Strain into a bowl, add hot water to bring quantity to 425ml.
Pour hot syrup into flour mix, blending all the while to make a smooth mix.
Divide into 4 portions, 3 portions with a few drops of different colours. The last portion left white, but remove 140ml of the white portion to be coloured dark red for the top layer.
Grease an 18cm diameter by 5cm deep cake tin with corn/peanut oil. Pour 140ml of ONE portion of batter into tin, steam for 5-6 minutes over rapidly boiling water in a wok/steamer. Repeat with 140ml of NEXT portion of a DIFFERENT colour and so on and so forth till batter is used up, and you have yourself a rainbow layered cake.
For the final top layer, use the dark red batter set aside previously.
Remove cake to cool for 7-8 hours beforeslicing into thin slivers with an oiled knife.
Enjoy!

By the way, Aussie cuisine isn't boring...it's lovely! Was in Melbourne this July for a one week holiday, it was fantastic...went up Mt. Danddenong,Lake Mountain,the 12 apostles...St. Kilda's beach...ooh fantastic, I wanna live there! Brisbane and Perth is great too. Had a great chocolate swirled caramel cheesecake in a cafe at Melbourne, Bourke Street,no luck re-creating it here, any help is appreciated, thanks!

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#19 Sat 09 Oct 04 5:41am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hey ho...nope there's no alternative for szechuan hot bean sauce, but its pretty common nowadays,you should be able to obtain it!
Fermented black beans...are best mates with stir-fries and garlic and ginger...but you can also use it for steaming a good slice of cod fish with slivers of ginger,a tbsp of peanut oil pounded with some black beans( go easy man...they're really salty!), a few drops of sesame oil, spring onion and red chilli shreds. Light and delicious with stir fried bok choy sauteed in garlic, chinese rice wine,soy sauce and peanut oil, all served with steamed rice.
Also, steam chicken with black beans,ginger, sliced chinese mushrooms (soak them in hot water, discard stalks, slice thinly)and a glug of brandy. Ideal for cold nights and also after pregnancy for ladies, the ginger and brandy helps to reduce bloated-ness (is there such a word? Haha)...but its true though...
Black beans can be used also in a sauce for noodles. Get hold of some egg noodles/flat white rice noodles. Stir fry the black beans in some smoking hot peanut oil, minced ginger, garlic,chilli, sliced sweet white onion and spring onions. Toss in some sliced beef and saute till done. Add some chicken stock and thick dark soy sauce, and a paste of water and cornstarch to thicken the sauce. Throw in the noodles to braise for a while in the sauce, I like to crack an egg over on top and braise till done. Eat with your fav boiled veggies...woo hoo!
Hope this helps...

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#20 Sat 09 Oct 04 5:52am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Green beans/green veggies? Maybe if you specify a bit more...I can help.
As for the fish, its grouper. You can obtain it in chinatown markets or something, look for one with bright eyes,firm gills and a fat tail! Ask the guy to scale and gut it for you.
If the fish is fresh, you don't need to do much to bring out the best flavours. Rub the fish all over with peanut oil, stuff ginger and garlic into it's stomach cavity. Slit cuts along the fish body on both sides. Steam till done over high heat. When the fish is done, top with some good soy sauce, sesame oil and shredded spring onions.
In a little pan, heat up 1-2 tbsp peanut oil (depending on the fish size, some can be real whoppers!) till its smoking hot, saute thinly sliced shallots in the oil till just softened, then quickly pour the boiling oil over the fish. Serve immediately, very impressive! You do it as a main dish in your restaurant with a fillet/half a smaller grouper fish split lengthways with steamed rice and veggies on the side for those who want a light meal.
Try this at home first...see if you like it!

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