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#21 Sat 09 Oct 04 6:08am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi there...wow LadyRed...your soup looks different,albeit interesting,my guess is that it's fusion cooking?
For you and Mary...try this Thai Tom Yam soup that is cooked in every typical Thai household!
YOU NEED:
500gm best quality shrimp/prawns
2 litres water
2-3 tbsp Thai Red Curry paste
2 tbsp tamarind paste
1-2 chopped chilli padi (bird eye chillies, a real hot chilli!)
5 lime leaves (limau purut)
2 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp lime juice from Thai lime, steeped with zest of a Thai lime
1 tbsp soft brown sugar
Mixed seafood of your choice, depends on whether you're feeling extravagant
Coriander leaves, to serve

HOW:
Remove the prawn heads and shells, leaving the tail intact on the prawns, devein them.
Pound the heads & shells lightly with the back of a knife.
Stir fry the head and shells in a pan over high heat with 1 tbsp peanut oil and a knob of ginger till deep orange, add the curry & tamarind paste. Saute for a minute
Pour in a cup of the water, boil rapidly for 5 minutes. Add the rest of the water, simmer for 2o minutes, strain the stock. Discard head and shells. Pour strained stock back into the pan.
Add rest of ingredients (except prawns and mixed seafood), boil for 2 minutes, check seasoning, add more sugar if too sour.
Gently poach seafood, sprinkle coriander over, serve immediately.
It's a really light broth with a heady flavour of the best of Thai ingredients, try and see if you like it!

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#22 Sat 09 Oct 04 6:40am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Deb...wow Brisbane! I went last year in June with my family...had a blast at Surfer's Paradise,Movie World,Sea World and my fav was Tangalooma where we fed the wild dolphins! It was freezing cold at night and my hands smelt of herring but I didn't care, it was beautiful!
Anyway,the dessert you are talking about it called Ah-Balling...a glutinous Rice ball in a clear/milky soup made from ground peanuts. The balls can be stuffed with peanut paste, red bean paste or black sesame seed paste.
You can now buy frozen glutinous rice balls from good chinese supermarkets, but make the syrup yourself at home to go with the balls. Prepare balls as directed in the package.
In a clear soup, boil 500ml water with 300ml brown sugar with some knotted screwpine (pandan leaves)& ginger slices. It's light, ideal for old folks or on a cold day.
In a milky soup, toast 200gm peanuts till golden and fragrant. Blend half the peanuts, 1 tsp Thai rice grains and 1/2 litre water in a liquidiser till very smooth, strain into a pot. Repeat with the other half of the peanuts, 1 tsp rice grains and another 1/2 litre of water, strain into the same pot Add remaining water into the pot with 2 cups sugar, 1/2 tsp salt, 4 knotted screwpine leaves and a glug of evaporated milk. Boil till slightly thickened, serve with the glutinous rice balls. It's really rich so serve in small quantities. Enjoy!

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#23 Sat 09 Oct 04 6:45am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

My family likes this version better Deb...it's crisp and yummy.

Glutinous Rice Balls
Filling:
1 cup red bean paste (you can buy canned versions, its pretty good0

Skin:
2 cups glutinous rice powder (look in asian markets for this)
5 Tabl. sugar
2/3 cup water

1 cup sesame seeds
6 cups oil for frying.

Filling:
Divide red bean paste into 16 portions
Skin:
mix ingredients into a smooth dough. Lightly oil table top and place on table and knead until smooth.  Roll into a long roll and cut into 16
pieces.

Procedure:
Flatten each piece of dough into a 2-inch wide circle.  Place a portion of filling in middle and gather edges of skin to enclose filling.
Pinch tightly to seal.
(make sure you do a good job here becase if they are open or come open during frying it is messy (the oil splatters more))  Roll each filled skin into a ball and dip in water.  Coat outside with sesame seeds.
Heat oil for deep-frying.  Deep fry balls over medium heat for 5minutes until expanded and golden. remove drain and serve.
Enjoy!!

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#24 Sat 09 Oct 04 7:57am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Thai influence drumsticks

This will be good if you have a broiler. In a blender, blitz some garlic cloves, shallots and ginger with a bunch of coriander, lemongrass stalks(use the stalk part, hack off the green part and 1cm off the bottom), fish sauce, lime juice, brown sugar and some coconut milk. Marinate the chicken in that, broil till browned and crisp, basting frequently. Enjoy!

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#25 Sat 09 Oct 04 8:00am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Stefanie, (waving)
Wow, thanks for those recipes! I am looking forward to trying them. Can't wait.......
The greens that I mentioned are like long green leaves.I noticed them being served quite regularly. They are greens that I don't normally see, and I work with loads of greens.
Also Stefanie at the Satay Club, I had some wonderful skewered food with various sauces. There was a peanut based sauce I had which was great. I've had quite a few variations on the peanut / Sateh sauce. How would you or your Family make this?
All your dessert recipes sound wonderful as well. Looking forward to giving those a go as well.
Thanks again Stefanie! Take care.

Kind Regards,
Mary In Miami  big_smile

P.S.....good for a girl's night in.......that's what I'm talking about. wink

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#26 Sat 09 Oct 04 9:48am

Stefanie

Forum champ
From Flashing my gold
Member since Fri 09 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Mary...my guess is that the greens you ate is either a kailan (a vegetable originating from China) or Kang Kong (water convolvulus). Was the dish spicy or not? Kailan is non-spicy, usually fried with oyster sauce, loads of garlic, sugar and chinese wine. Kang Kong is fried with dried shrimps, belachan(dried shrimp paste,strong smell like feet),shallots,chilli and a little garlic. These are the most commonly served veggie dishes in chinese/malay restaurants in Singapore.
As for the sauce, you're in luck I do have a pretty authentic recipe from my mum's best friend who lives in Kuala Lumpur. You can use it as a dip for skewered barbequed chicken,pork or beef at BBQs. A bit more effort is needed for this, but it's worth it.

You need:
1/2 cup peanuts, toasted till golden brown and coarsely chopped
A 50-70gm sweet potato, peeled, boiled and mashed with 3tbsp hot water
10 dried chiilies, soaked in water and ground with 2 cloves garlic (reduce chillies if you can't take the heat)
3tbsp brown sugar
1/2 cup water
salt to taste
1 tbsp each tomato paste and white rice vinegar
1/4 cup crushed pineapple *optional

How:
In a saucepan, combine chilli paste, tomato paste,brown sugar, water and salt. Bring to the boil, stirring to dissolve sugar.
Add vinegar and mashed potato (push potato thru a sieve into pan). Reduce heat and keep boiling till thickened. Add ground peanuts, stir and remove from heat, add a little morevinegar if too sweet.
*optional: add the pineapple if you want a nice tart fruity flavour. Very nice indeed!

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#27 Sat 09 Oct 04 5:55pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: The Silk Road

Thanks for the great recipes and tips! Especially with the salty beans as they are a "strange" igredient. At first they are quite smelly but the taste turns out lovely!! (similar to dried shrimp, they also had a 'different' smell to them ;-) ;-)

The problem I've with Asian food is I don't know which recipes are traditional and which are a kind of fusion type dish... But as long as they taste yummy that's ok I guess...

The recipe for 'cold night' sounds great as the weather has just turned **snief** The lovely bit of autumn is over and now it's cold and rainy! Great time for a night in ;-)

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#28 Sat 09 Oct 04 6:04pm

figgy

Member
From western autralia
Member since Wed 29 Sep 04

Re: The Silk Road

thanks stephanie i think you've given me the recipes for all the dream asian dishes i 've loved so far in my life, will keep you posted as i discover more!!  ; )

i am not any kind of authority on cheesecakes but will do my best to find you a recipe for the one you described, can you remember the name of the cafe??

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#29 Sun 10 Oct 04 12:11am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: The Silk Road

Hi Stefanie,  big_smile
The greens that I had were not spicy. They were full of flavour and delicious. " Dried shrimp paste smells like feet"...........lol, Stefanie; you crack me up! lol
The Satay sauce sounds wonderful with those authentic twists (sweet potato & crushed pineapple.......oh yeah).
Stefanie, are there any more recipes that incorporate the 1000 year old egg? Maybe some more seafood recipes (fish); Chinese , Thai, Malay style?
Thanks again, all wholeheartedly appreciated!

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#30 Sun 10 Oct 04 2:11am

Oh Deb

Member
From Brisbane, Australia
Member since Sat 25 Sep 04

Re: The Silk Road

Many thanks for the recipes.  Have copied them over to my recipe files.

I also have lifted the sate sauce recipe - sounds perfect.

Brisbane is a great city (big town).  So close to so many fun activities.

I'm finding your postings interesting and informative.  Many thanks.

Deb

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