Jamie Oliver

forum: Food & Drink

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#41 Mon 01 Nov 04 7:07pm

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Thanks so much! You are very kind. One day, I will do something food related independantly; that's one of my goals. Right now, I am working diligently and gaining knowledge. I wholeheartedly appreciate your comments.


Kind Regards,
Mary In Miami  big_smile

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#42 Mon 01 Nov 04 11:25pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: Foodology

Thanks Mary, I'd really love some of your Colombian recipes ;-) Especially from you as you always post so great recipes! Thanks for the many ideas you post!

The gig sounds great - wonderful it worked out and there where many people there! Gnarly - interesting name if my dictionary translated it correctly **smile**

We didn't have Risotto Nero - nice you remembered taht **smile** - but the friend of mine who cooked had a nice idea - as a main course she wrapped smoked salmon around fresh white meat fish and poached it. Had a lovely tast to it!!

All the best to Miami too! (especially considering election tomorrow - in my memory there was never so much interest in Europe in an American election as this year...).

ciao, and have a nice week!!!
Claudia

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#43 Wed 03 Nov 04 7:22am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

It sounds like you had a great time with friends for Halloween. That's the way to do it, Family, friends, food and drink.
I'm still working on translating the recipes from Colombia for you. Meanwhile, please keep sharing yours, I always look forward to that.  big_smile
I hope everything is going well for you. I had a busy weekend and the week ahead looks jam packed as well. Take care and be well.

Ciao,
Mary  big_smile

P.S The salmon and white fish dish sounds lovely.

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#44 Thu 04 Nov 04 10:26am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Caludia,
Here you go, I hope you enjoy them. I'm starting with what is considered the most typical....Colombian comfort food. It's a nice hearty soup.

2 chicken b.r.e.a.s.t.s
garlic and onion
chicken stock
12 small yellow potatoes, cut in half
2 ears of corn, cut in half, then quarters
8 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 5mm slices
1 bunch scallion, tied
1 bunch cilantro, tied
8 tablespoons "guascas" (typical herb of Colombia which gives the dish it's distinct taste)- marjoram runs a more or less second
2 tablespoons capers drained, rough chopped
1 cup heavy cream
2 avocados, peeled, pitted, and thinly sliced
salt and freshly ground black pepper

The night before marinate the chicken b.r.e.a.s.t.s with garlic and onion, salt and pepper. In a heavy 4 liter casserole, put in the chicken, cover and cook until chicken is tender. Transfer the chicken to a platter. Remove the skin from the chicken and disccard. Cut the chicken into strips. Cook the yellow potatoes in the casserole with the chicken stock until they start to dissolve. Add more chicken stock to taste. At this point the soup should be thick and fairly smooth. Add the bunch of scallions, cilantro, the sliced potatoes, (extra sauted garlic), the guascas (marjoram), and the corn. Cook again until potatoes are tender, these you want in chunks, more or less. Adjust seasoning. Serve the chicken in soup bowls and pour the soup over the chicken. Pour 3 tablespoons of heavy cream and 1 tablespoon of chopped capers in each bowl. Float the sliced avocado on top. Serves 4.

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#45 Thu 04 Nov 04 10:36am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Claudia , these are so good. Plantains to people in Colombia are basically what tortillas are to people from Mexico. We eat plantains cooked green or ripe.

4 large green plantains
vegetable oil for deep frying
salt to taste

Peel the plantains and cut into 3-4 pieces, fry in hot oil. When they are golden, take them out of the oil. Pound them flat. Soak for a few seconds in a saucer with salt and water. Return them to the oil and refry them for a few minutes, until a nice golden brown (more golden) and crispy outer edges. Remove and place on paper towels. Sprinkle with salt to taste. You can also sprinkle with pepper if you like.

These are great with butter or dipping them in a lemon juice, garlic/onion sauce. I could snack on these all the time.

big_smile

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#46 Thu 04 Nov 04 10:55am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Claudia, this is very common and soooooooo good. Some people put stewed raisins in it as well. After cooking the arequipe it is placed in a large container in the fridge. Just take a spoonful and with that you'll get "comfort" for a while.... big_smile  It's time consuming, but the end result is well worth it.

3 quarts whole milk
2 pounds sugar
pinch of salt
1/4 tablespoon baking soda
2 egg yolks
cinnamon stick

Combine ingredients in a saucepan and simmer until thickened. Stir constantly, preferably with a wooden spoon, until you see the bottom of the saucepan while stirring (4-5 hours,   :shock:  , I know). Add the egg yolks and let cook 2-3 minutes longer. Remove cinnamon stick and let cool. This recipe must be watched constantly. Put in a container and place in the fridge.
There's a short cut, but the taste just doesn't compare.

big_smile

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#47 Thu 04 Nov 04 8:51pm

LadyRed

Forum champ
From Vienna, Austria
Member since Wed 18 Aug 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Mary!

Many thanks for the recipes - the soup sounds gorgeous! And I had plantains as a side dish in an Brazilian restaurant, but never made them myself... Got to try that too!!!

The Arequipe also sounds interesting, but takes a long time - perhaps one long winter sunday to try it? Does it turn a caramel colour (as the name suggegst) or does it stay white? And how can you keep the milk from burning at the bottom when you cook it for so long?

all the best, and hope everything is OK at your end of the world **smile**
Claudia

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#48 Fri 05 Nov 04 9:27am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Hi Claudia,
Yes, it's "painstakingly" long.  sad The end result is a very thick like caramel. It will be caramel colour not white. You have to cook it on very "low" heat and stir constantly, watching it so it doesn't burn.
It's the Colombian version of dulce de leche. Just real thick. The short cut is boiling condensed milk in can for a couple of hours. I have tried that, it's good; but it just isn't the same for me.
Hope this helps.  big_smile

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#49 Fri 05 Nov 04 10:00am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Claudia,
This has got to be one of my favourite things from Colombia. Over there we eat this with seafood cooked in various ways. It's a staple.

1 fresh coconut
4 cups boiling water
3 1/2 cups water (including coconut water)
2 cups of rice
1 tablespoon salt (to taste)
1 tablespoon sugar (to taste)

Take a fresh coconut, open the "eyes" with a nail and drain the coconut water in a cup and reserve it. Brake the coconut, remove the hard core (coconut meat), cut it in rather small pieces and divide into two portions. Put one portion at a time in the blender with one cup of very hot water and liquify for 2-3 minutes (carefully cover the top of the blender with a folded kitchen towel to avoid getting splashed with the hot mixture). Pour through a sieve and squeeze all the water out in a pan. Blend again the squeezed coconut with another cup of hot water and squeeze again. Discard the residue. Repeat procedure with second portion. Set this coconut milk to boil until it is almost reduced and the coconut oil starts to show. Reduce the heat to medium and stir the bottom continuously with a wooden spoon to avoid sticking to the pan; let the cream more or less brown. Do not let it get too dark, this cream should not be bitter. Add the 3 1/2 cups water, which include the coconut water reserved form the beginning. Increase the heat to high and when the water starts to boil, add the two cups of rice, the salt and sugar (it should taste a "bit" more sweet than salty). When rice is starting to dry, reuduce the heat to a simmer, stir gently with a long fork, cover and let cook for about 20 -25 minutes.

Note: You can add one cup of raisans when the rice is staring to dry (optional). Depending on how fresh the coconut is, you may get enough oil to make 3 cups of rice, then add 5 1/2 cups of liquid.

*These recipes are a little rough around the edges, but I think you get the jist.

Hope everything is smooth in Vienna!

Ciao,
big_smile

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#50 Sat 06 Nov 04 8:22am

foietruffledisiac

Forum champ
Member since Wed 07 Jul 04

Re: Foodology

Hey Claudia,
Just the other night for our Amuse Gouche / Geul, we made a wild boar/pork pate with pistachios and served it on butter fried croutons with huckleberry sauce. Yum! I thought about you.............

How does this salad sound?
Roasted Pear with Arugula, Endive, Radicchio, Goat Cheese, Grilled Red Onion, Toasted Walnuts, and Balsamic-Berry Vinaigrette

big_smile

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