forum: Food & Drink

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#11 Mon 14 Jul 08 4:22pm

gettafix

Member
Member since Mon 14 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Pay a visit to the kitchens at Hampton court Palace, lots of original equipment, ideas recipes. Good luck

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#12 Mon 14 Jul 08 5:06pm

DebDiMaggio

Forum champ
Occupation Newbie Mamma
From Italy-UK-Spain
Member since Mon 16 Jun 08

Re: Medieval cooking

there's another Spanish Xativi recepie calle Arnady it's a dessert made of pumpkin and ground almonds, it's very traditional and it dates back to the medieval times http://www.nutricionyrecetas.com/receta … s/6850.htm
.

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#13 Mon 14 Jul 08 5:21pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Medieval cooking

I've just built a vertical fire basket to go in my big barbeque so I can burn logs and spit roast in front of them, which was the medieval method.

Previously, I have done many spit roasts over the coals (anything up to 120lb pigs) but roasting in front of the fire definitely produces a different taste.

I've also started collecting old recipes - starting with "the forme of curry", which must be the earliest English CookBook.

What is quite startling at times is how modern many of the old recipes sound!

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#14 Mon 14 Jul 08 7:05pm

Ms Kira

Member
Occupation freelancer
From Greenville, SC
Member since Mon 07 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

I've done no medieval cooking, unless marshmallows in the fireplace counts. I've experienced a bit of medieval torture. Oh, that's called 'dentistry' nowadays.

I really am curious about slow cooking, using spits and smoking and all that. There's just so much flavor to be had from letting something sit a while and soak it all in.

I've just replace the inside parts of my gas grill a couple weeks ago, and now have a second grill I'm considering converting to charcoal and trying some smoking techniques with that. We'll see...

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#15 Mon 14 Jul 08 7:17pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Medieval cooking

My mom used to have a little cookbook for cooking in the fire place. We bought it in the US and it was based on pioneer recipes.

We never used any of the recipes (as no fireplace), but enjoyed browsing and reading.

Will check this weekend if she still has it.

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#16 Mon 14 Jul 08 7:20pm

Krista Huerta

Member
Member since Mon 14 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hello,

I have a thing for medieval and renaissance food, and life. So, yes I have cooked like this before. The food itself comes out to be so yummy, even with minimal spices. I have worked at renaissance fairs and because I am a chef, I helped to produce menus, and I have catered to medieval parties. I just love cooking this way, and wish I had time to cook like this more often. I hope your experience was as great as mine. Much Luck to you!!

Krista

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#17 Tue 15 Jul 08 6:43am

chief10

Member
Occupation enterpreneur
From Malinska - Croatia
Member since Tue 15 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

Hi guys,
              we in Croatian coast are usually preparing meat, poultry and fish under "peka". What is "peka"?  Specially made of clay or cust iron hat which you heat before use on fireplace. Speciality is sucking lamb under "peka".

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#18 Tue 15 Jul 08 8:49am

madamada

Forum super champ
Occupation living life
From Friuli northern Italy
Member since Mon 14 Jan 08

Re: Medieval cooking

We were invited once at a medioevo dinnerparty inn a Castello. Low lights, camerieri and giullari with medievo dresses and painted faces, musica dal vivo but but but the sala was too crowded and the tables had a narrow corridor inbetween. No plates, a piadina-like bread to put on different entries. Only a scodella for a soup. No fork, only a knife, no tsp.
When they came with a cinghiale on a big woodden tray and started pasing around to serve everybody, we sow people jump from their seats putting hands on their necks ,,,,,,,
What had happened? The hot sugo had started scorrere from the tagliere di portata directy onto their necks

isn't this a medioeval practice?

soon afterwards everybody had his napkin on his shoulders instead of his legs and a part from the rimborsi for the spoiled giacche e pellicce on the  seats everybody went on eating happily smile

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#19 Tue 15 Jul 08 10:55am

RDP

Member
From London
Member since Tue 15 Jul 08

Re: Medieval cooking

There's an annual medieval festival in a German town called Soest in September (6th & 7th), where people dress up, have a medieval market and serve food prepared in a medieval style: http://www.soest.de/veranstaltungen/hig … 017105.php , http://www.gaudium.schwider.de (both sites are in German)

The town itself is very old and the centre is well preserved with many houses from around 1500, which yields the proper atmosphere for such a festival.

Ralf

Last edited by RDP (Tue 15 Jul 08 10:58am)

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#20 Tue 15 Jul 08 11:23am

DebDiMaggio

Forum champ
Occupation Newbie Mamma
From Italy-UK-Spain
Member since Mon 16 Jun 08

Re: Medieval cooking

I saw a recepie once where they wrapped a seasoned side of pork in a 1cm sheet of terracotta and then placed it under coals and kept the temp steady for about 1 or 2 hours then they took it out and the clay was hard they hammered it and the meat was perfectly cooked inside, then they took the top part of the terracotta and the base served as a plate. I think they made it in the times of El Cid!

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