forum: Gardening / Growing

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#1 Tue 09 Mar 10 7:12pm

JP6699

Member
From United Kingdom
Member since Sat 20 Feb 10

Leggy Coriander

Hi,

My coriander is about 3 inches tall with it's seedling leaves and it's first 'proper' leaves coming through now. They've gone leggy and are falling over. They have plenty of light and water and all my other herbs are growing fine. Anything I can do to help them?

Thanks.

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#2 Tue 09 Mar 10 7:17pm

MsK

Forum champ
Occupation Travelling around the globe..
From ..Holland..land of windmills!!
Member since Tue 12 Jan 10

Re: Leggy Coriander

Put some sticks around it an tie them around it with some string?

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#3 Tue 09 Mar 10 7:43pm

ACDC

Forum champ
Occupation Bewitched, bothered and bewildered Mother
From Ireland
Member since Tue 19 Aug 08

Re: Leggy Coriander

Ease off on the water, there should be plenty in the potting compost to keep them, if they get too wet/damp around the base they can "damp off" and unless they come back after a couple of days with no water they may not come back at all. With seedlings it is best to water from the bottom, as in water the saucer or tray where the potting compost and seeds are planted. Too much water is as bad as too little. If we think about how tiny the seeds are, it might give an indication of how much water they need. Barely damp is the best. Hopefully they'll come back, I don't know about tying them up this early, the stems are very fragile just now. Even when transplanting we are told not to handle the roots or the stems, just gently to use one leaf. A few pea sticks maybe, or tiny twigs to prop them gently. Perhaps a little shade...  Someone else will probably know about the light.
I hope something works for you. Let us know how you get on.

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#4 Tue 09 Mar 10 8:25pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Leggy Coriander

Morning light and some afternoon shade is ideal.  Soil temps at 70F or over will cause them to bolt.  Sounds like damping off is the problem or a fungal disease.  If that's the case, time to start over, use well-drained soil, sanitize containers and use sanitized or sterilized soil when starting seeds.  Avoid touching the stems of seedlings.

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#5 Wed 10 Mar 10 10:23am

libra

Member
Member since Tue 04 Nov 08

Re: Leggy Coriander

You say they have 'plenty of light', but is it direct sunlight? In the UK this shouldn't be too harsh for them.

As soon as any of my seeds germinate, I take them out of the shadecloth protection and expose them to morning sun for a few hours. Unless you do this they will get thin, leggy, and fall over. I am in Western Australia, where the temps  have been around 32-36C for weeks, and it's not too much for new seedlings, as long as you give them enough water.

I won't be planting my coriander till it cools down - it bolts to seed too quickly if I plant too early.

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#6 Sun 15 Apr 12 7:37pm

aflower

Member
Member since Sat 25 Feb 12

Re: Leggy Coriander

Hi! I have the same problem! It seems to be perfectly healthy apart from the fact that it's too tall and leggy to stand up on its own. It isn't damping off as it's been like this for a couple of weeks now and doesn't have the tell tale sign of a little narrow bit at the stem. Someone said to me that maybe It is bolting and maybe I have kept it too warm? I have had it in our conservatory but it's old and not very warm at the best of times due to the bottom of the door being bitten off by a rotweiler...long story! But I did keep it on a windowsil near a radiator for the first few weeks after it has sprouted. It's my first time growing anything so would love advice aswell. I also read that coriander hates being transfered to new pots and they get stressed or bolt because of this? Mine is about a month old, how old is yours? crossed

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#7 Sun 15 Apr 12 8:50pm

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Leggy Coriander

Truth is that if they are started off from seed indoors & somewhere too warm, & they are allowed to grow beyond their strength to remain sturdy, no amount of daylight will help them.

A cool(ish), frost-free place with good light (out of sunshine if under glass or next to  windows) should make for thicker, slower growing stems.
If they are in a overly warm indoor environment they grow too quickly, making them weak & spindly.

If they are already spindly, don't dispair..........move them to a cooler (though not cold) place & only water sparingly from below. The compost should be damp, not wet..........warm & wet is what causes 'damping off'.

You may lose them still, but maybe not.
Good Luck.

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#8 Sun 15 Apr 12 8:58pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Leggy Coriander

minni, i wanted to ask you why onion stalks... the upper leaves fold in two and seem to almost break...

My husband wanted me to ask this question and i told him to wait for you to be here smile

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#9 Tue 17 Apr 12 11:57am

aflower

Member
Member since Sat 25 Feb 12

Re: Leggy Coriander

Thanks for your advice Minerva. Is it best to move the seedlings to a cooler place the moment they come up or is it best to leave them in the warm for just a few days whilst they are tiny? They are looking surprisingly healthy in their new cooler home. They have folded over but are resting on a thicker part of the stem. Will have to get some trays so I can pour water in for them to drink from the bottom. When I used this method before it seemed to make the soil really wet and led to damping off in a few tomatoes I had growing. Is there anything I can do to avoid this?

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#10 Tue 17 Apr 12 8:48pm

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Leggy Coriander

kye in france wrote:

minni, i wanted to ask you why onion stalks... the upper leaves fold in two and seem to almost break...

They fold in two because the leaves are too long for them to stay rigid enough, the leaves themselves being 'sappy' inside as opposed to being 'woody' enough to stand up straight & tall. (cut a leaf across, & look at it in cross-section & you will see what I mean).
The seeming to almost break is due to this sappiness too, once the leaf has folded over it starts to cut off the sap supply to the top part of the leaf causing it to bruise & ultimately to die back.

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