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#11 Thu 09 Sep 10 12:59pm

heather6169

Member
Occupation Mum, Nanna, Wife and Fundraiser
From South Penrith, Australia
Member since Fri 11 Jun 10

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

I have a Lactose intolerance. The strange thing is that Ialways ate and drank dairy until I was pregnant with my 3rd child and simply could not get enough vanilla, malt milkshakes. Now I am intolerant to them and get very ill when I have some. So I don't know why or how mine developed I've just learnt to change recipes to soy etc

Cheers Heather smile

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#12 Fri 10 Sep 10 1:46am

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

Intolerances can crop up at any time. Often they come in gradually and it's not until the symptoms get really disruptive that people seek attention for them. My gluten intolerance was going on for at least a decade before diagnosis. It's just the symptoms were originally more subtle.

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#13 Tue 28 Sep 10 6:13pm

BritFinn

Forum champ
Occupation Opiskelija
From Finland
Member since Thu 26 Aug 10

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

contentedbody wrote:

Allergies and intolerances have very different causes and mechanisms, although the treatment plan for both would be very similar ie avoid the food.  Intolerance though, unlike allergies, arent permanent and if you eliminate the food and do the right things to allow your body to heal then you will then be able to reintroduce the food at a later stage without it causing you any problems.  There are good tests available now to identify both allergies (IgE responses) and intolerances (IgG responses) so it's great that the guesswork can be taken away and we can all take control of our health when dealing with allergies and intolerances.

Sorry, to disagree, but it's not really just intolerances, but rather autoimmune conditions, you should be talking about.

For instance in celiac disease, gluten stimulates the production of immunoglobulins that attack the villi  lining the small intestine (that is, the body's own normal tissues), whereas allergies produce a reaction, for example hives, vomiting etc. Celiac disease is often confused for an allergic illness because (like an allergy) it requires a foreign substance to trigger it.

Another difference between autoimmune conditions and allergies is that autoimmune disorders are never outgrown; they persist for life. Allergies can sometimes be outgrown.

Also, autoimmune conditions can result in long-term damage to the body. For instance, because celiac disease damages the small intestine, people with celiac disease are at risk for malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, iron-deficiency anemia, and osteoporosis. People with celiac disease are also at risk for other autoimmune conditions, such as thyroid disease, diabetes, and liver disease.

In addition, in untreated celiac disease, a type of white blood cell called the T lymphocyte is activated, along with other parts of the immune system, putting patients at increased risk to develop gastrointestinal lymphomas. A wheat allergy, in contrast, would not put patients at risk for any of these problems.

I'm not trying to downplay the severity of allergies, (my husband has a very violent allergeric reaction to shell fish) but in general, allergies usually result in only temporary symptoms without long-term damage, unless they produce a fatal anaphylactic reaction.

But I think the main thing we should all be relieved about is that allergies and food intolerances are better understood now, making life easier for those affected.

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#14 Fri 12 Nov 10 12:33pm

RebeccaBourhill

Member
Occupation Student wanna be chef
From Rustenberg, South Africa
Member since Mon 30 Aug 10

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

I Used to have Wheat, sugar and dairy intolorance. I found that very hard. It was only for 5 months. At least!

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#15 Sat 13 Nov 10 1:16am

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

Food intolerances are usually life long. Though often childhood intolerances and allergies are grown out of by adult hood.

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#16 Wed 17 Nov 10 6:20pm

jbarr

Member
Member since Mon 18 Jan 10

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

I have a wheat intolerance, as well as dairy and egg yolk, which makes life difficult baking bread as most recipes seem to use eggs to make up for the lack of gluten in gluten-free flour. I have tried many egg replacers but have failed miserably.

But since I am not actually intolerant to gluten does anyone know if I can add gluten to my gluten free flour (or find simply wheat free flour) and if I can, can I then follow normal recipes?

I would be most grateful to any one who can either answer or send me in the right direction for websites/forums etc as I seem to have hit a brick wall with my searches and beginning to lose motivation and hope!

Cheers! x

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#17 Wed 17 Nov 10 6:22pm

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

You could try rye flour or barley flour - but the chances of cross-contamination with wheat during the processing is very high - it might be worth a go, though.  Also, it really does depend on which country you're in as to what might be available for you ....

Hopefully someone else will be along to help, too  smile

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#18 Tue 21 Dec 10 10:55am

timpbetts

Member
Member since Mon 20 Dec 10

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

For all of you with allergies; food intolerances or just have a hatred for some ingredients, there is now a handy app available. You'll find it at www.isitinit.co.uk
The download is free and you can register; choose the ingredients and trial it for 7 days for free. Then, if you want to keep using it it costs 10pa which is 20pence per week, so quite affordable.
Hope it helps.

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#19 Tue 21 Dec 10 11:41pm

Birdymum

Forum champ
From Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Member since Thu 23 Oct 08

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

Instead of it being a nuscience like it would have been a few years ago, I find it very useful when the kids bring home friends that can tell me what they are intolerant of and/or allergic to. These days with so many people suffering from intolerances and allergies it isn't difficult to find alternatives in the supermarkets so that everyone can be catered for and most people from a young age now know what they can and can't have.

For example one daughter wanted a pizza party and was able to tell me that one friend was celiac and two were lactose intolerant. That made a trip to the supermarket armed with a list of no-go ingredients much easier than it used to be a few years ago. I think as people start making their needs made more public that manufacturers are now responding with new products. thumbsup

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#20 Wed 22 Dec 10 10:55am

SmellyCat

Member
Occupation Musician, arts admin
From Birmingham, UK
Member since Wed 22 Dec 10

Re: Food intolerances and allergies

That BBC article was dreadful. Just because one person doesn't react, doesn't mean there isn't a problem!

One of my best friends has a serious dairy allergy - I've known her for 10 years now, so I've had a decade's experience of dairy-free cooking & baking. It's quite easy to avoid milk products when you cook from scratch but it never ceases to astonish me how many foods contain dairy derivatives when it seems completely unnecessary. After Green & Black's was bought up by Cadbury, milk powder started to appear in their previously dairy-free dark chocolate bars, like the Maya Gold one, which my friend used to love. She only found out after having an allergic reaction. Now, I do realise that those with allergies etc should scrupulously check ingredients labels; however, this product had been 'safe' for years and Cadbury/Green & Black's gave no warning to their consumers.

It's amazing how many allergy/intolerance-free alternatives there are available now, but we still have some way to go. My attempts at baking cupcakes that are dairy, wheat, gluten and egg-free have all failed spectacularly!

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