forum: Gardening / Growing

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#21 Sat 08 Oct 11 1:28am

JoyYamDaisy

Forum super champ
From Melbourne Australia
Member since Sun 12 Apr 09

Re: Food foraging around the UK

We used to forage from feral trees (esp peach and plum) along the country roadsides around Bendigo. We got a great haul because no one else bothered!
cool

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#22 Sat 08 Oct 11 2:09am

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Food foraging around the UK

I remember when we were picking blackberries, we were in a country lane, i continued into another smaller lane, there was a very large house behind and totally silent.

A big car suddenly came out of the gates and the driver gave me a cruel look yikes so i smiled smile i was after all on the outside of his gardens...

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#23 Sat 08 Oct 11 9:16pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Food foraging around the UK

An extension to my (much) earlier caution. Avoid old petrol station sites, they usually have contaminated the ground water and that moves very slowly so it will be there for a long long time and moving in the direction the ground water does.

Kye, I agree outside the fence is fair game. I asked a neighbour if I could take mulberries off the branches hanging over the fence on to the street. They cut down the tree. I'd even said if I'd not got a response I wouldn't do it....i even offered to share the jam. It was a famous person....one of the members of ACDC.

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#24 Sat 08 Oct 11 9:31pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Food foraging around the UK

In that case TWR, they should have invited you to take the mulberries.  I don't consider fruit hanging over a fence to belong to anyone passing by.  I'm sure the person who owns that tree was reluctant to cut off a productive branch.  It's within a person's rights to some extent here to cut off any branches hanging over onto their property.  But, that's not really the same as a branch hanging over a piece of land that doesn't belong to you.

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#25 Sat 08 Oct 11 9:54pm

The White Rabbit

Forum super champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Food foraging around the UK

That's why I asked first. I never got any fruit from it. I wanted to get a ladder up to the higher fruit (that was still hanging over the fence). It was a big stone fence and I knew they were celebrities so might be a bit nervous about that.

Last edited by The White Rabbit (Sat 08 Oct 11 9:55pm)

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#26 Sun 09 Oct 11 1:17am

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Food foraging around the UK

There was a case I read about where a man took avocados from a tree that had limbs hanging over the fence.  They were technically  still on the owner's property, little did the man taking them realize, but come on.  He had to know he was taking someone's fruit.  The man taking them had to pay the highest market value of $2 each and court costs.  The owner was growing them for market.  If someone is caring for a fruit tree on their property and a few limbs hang over the fence, it seems like stealing in a moral sense to me if you take the fruit, even if it isn't in the legal sense.

Last edited by MsPablo (Sun 09 Oct 11 1:19am)

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#27 Sun 09 Oct 11 9:41am

falconcy

Forum champ
Occupation Project Manager
From Limassol, Cyprus
Member since Tue 19 Dec 06

Re: Food foraging around the UK

On a wander out with the dog earlier, I managed to come back with a sprig of sage and a green lemon. Should go well with today's Roast Chicken.

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#28 Sun 09 Oct 11 7:55pm

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Food foraging around the UK

The law as it stands in England is:

What is on the tree (leaves/fruit) belongs to the owner of the tree, no matter which side of the fence it is on.

Windfalls (leaves/fruit) that have fallen NATURALLY (ie without help!!!) from the tree belongs to whoever's land the produce has fallen onto.

If tree limbs overhang someone's property they have the right to prune those limbs, but not to damage/kill the tree, & must return the severed wood to the tree's owner for removal (that you cannot burn it, bin it or take it to the tip, etc surprises many people!), since not to do so is actually theft.

It is neighbourly (obviously) to avoid wrangles by discussing problems, but with intransigent neighbours it helps to know the law before you NEED to!

Last edited by minerva (Sun 09 Oct 11 7:55pm)

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#29 Thu 03 Nov 11 1:48am

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: Food foraging around the UK

Mussels are great at the moment. I hope to experiment with seaweed soon.
Also, I may set a line for fish, I need to find the right tide.
Edible Seashore is a cool book. I never new that the smaller shore crabs, could be used to make soup. ESS has a recipe, I must try it.

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#30 Fri 16 Dec 11 12:31am

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: Food foraging around the UK

Hurahh, I now know what Alexandras are and there are lots of them. It has to be said though, they related to belladonna , thats a bit scary.
Anyone in the UK use colapsable pots or similar. I am thinking  for shrimp, shellfish, or prawn. That would be  without a boat.

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