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#11 Sun 23 Sep 12 10:21am

dukegus

Forum champ
Occupation Unemployed,
From Greece
Member since Fri 21 Mar 08

Re: Chorizo Problems

Here in Greece I can only get the air cured from Spain and truth is that I haven't had any major problems with it's texture. It's is a bit chewier that fresh sausages but I guess most air dried cured meats are...

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#12 Sun 23 Sep 12 2:16pm

koukouvagia

Forum champ
From New York
Member since Fri 12 Dec 08

Re: Chorizo Problems

MsPablo wrote:

There are levels of curing in Spanish chorizo.  Some of it is only partially cured and therefore, it is softer than the fully cured type.

The 'fresh' uncured chorizo we find in the U.S. is Mexican-style chorizo.

So is fresh chorizo good?  Does it resemble spanish chorizo at all?  What do you use it for?

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#13 Sun 23 Sep 12 5:01pm

ryan85

Member
Member since Fri 21 Sep 12

Re: Chorizo Problems

Hey dave,

Yeah i made sure to peel the outer layer first. Although my friend said he left it on and it just crisped up when he fried it.

I appreciate everyone's input, there's alot of interesting opinions. I've learnt chorizo isn't such a straight forward topic!

Going to get  back oh the horse though and try a simple chorizo salad for dinner tonight.

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#14 Mon 24 Sep 12 6:55am

SherylS

Member
Occupation Totally food obsessed bookkeeper
From Melbourne, Australia
Member since Wed 13 Aug 08

Re: Chorizo Problems

Maree wrote:

koukouvagia wrote:

Ah but draining gets rid of the fat, that's where all the flavor is, especially for a stew!!

Perhaps, I didn't describe properly.

Take my smokey beans with chorizo: I cook the chorizo in a dry pan with onions. No need for oil in my opinion as the chorizo is fatty enough for me/us.

When the onions and chorizo are cooked and browned but not burnt/ dried out, remove them, place on paper towels and mop up the pan with more paper towel.

The onions have taken up enough of the flavour of the oil in the chorizo in the cooking process for me/us.

Then return to pan and add 400ml passata, cannellini beans (drained), some stock or water, smoked paprika, parsley. Cook for 8-10 mins. Serve with toast, steamed greens and a poached egg if desired.

This sounds great Maree, two of my favourite ingredients chorizo and beans in one dish! I'll be trying this for sure. yummy  yummy

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#15 Mon 24 Sep 12 1:40pm

Lanky Lou

Member
Occupation Jewellery maker
From Brit living in France
Member since Sun 10 Aug 08

Re: Chorizo Problems

I mainly use cured chorizo in pasta dishes but you have to have  relatively thin slices, big chunks will be chewy. I normal do the slices in the oven and they are fine.  I have also done them in the slow cooker, big chunks and it comes out really soft and lovely.

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#16 Mon 24 Sep 12 1:59pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Chorizo Problems

koukouvagia wrote:

MsPablo wrote:

There are levels of curing in Spanish chorizo.  Some of it is only partially cured and therefore, it is softer than the fully cured type.

The 'fresh' uncured chorizo we find in the U.S. is Mexican-style chorizo.

So is fresh chorizo good?  Does it resemble spanish chorizo at all?  What do you use it for?

I haven't used it in ages.  I used to make a quick 'nothing' dish - bell peppers, onion, tomatoes, chorizo and rice . . . but I think most people use it as a taco filling or cooked with potatoes and eggs or with a bean dish.  It's  sometimes put on pizza - it's pretty spicy.

Last edited by MsPablo (Mon 24 Sep 12 1:59pm)

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