forum: Food & Drink

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#641 Sat 22 Dec 12 1:14pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Ask me a cooking question

That's interesting, Hippy. Ham hocks are available year round in the two major supermarkets.

Always have one in the fridge for comforting pea and ham soup. Must admit, though, that I'm concerned re their long "best by" date.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#642 Sat 22 Dec 12 2:57pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Ask me a cooking question

I've never seen them here. What supermarkets stock varies depending on where you are, and supermarkets in Scotland for the most part stock Scottish cuts of meat, even if they're a UK-wide chain. I believe in most supermarkets the ordering is in the hands of a manager within the individual store, or an area manager, not headquarters, as they have to respond to differing demands in different areas.

Which makes it even more difficult for recipe writers!

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#643 Sat 22 Dec 12 3:09pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Ask me a cooking question

And recipe cookers, Hippy hmm.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#644 Sat 22 Dec 12 3:40pm

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Ask me a cooking question

Very interested in this subject of ham/bacon/gammon hocks.  After researching all the major supermarkets on line (UK) - there ain't any to be had. (Let me do a little name dropping:  Tesco, Sainsbury's, Morrisons and Waitrose.)
I'm housebound currently but one of my carers kindly offered to ask butchers in our local town.  She found one - bless her.  Asked her to buy 2.  £1.99 each.  The amount of gorgeous meat you get off one is amazing and the taste from being boiled on the bone, is something else again.  The other hock went into the freezer for a while.  I may make a pea & ham soup but enjoying this gammon so much that I may well do something similar.

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#645 Sat 22 Dec 12 6:57pm

LaSol1986

Member
Occupation office administrator
From Wuppertal, Germany
Member since Sat 22 Dec 12

Re: Ask me a cooking question

Hi Jamie,

I would like to make your Pears in Amarone for Christmas dessert. I had seen some videos, where the cooks just leave the pears in the pan and they don´t bake it in the oven. I want to do it like you do, but I just have the question: Is there something special, when I bake it in the oven?The tase or something like that?

Thanks in advance.

Best wishes

Kristina
(sorry for my bad english, I hope you understand it  smile  )

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#646 Sat 22 Dec 12 9:19pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Ask me a cooking question

mummza wrote:

cmcconnell1031 wrote:

I have looked everywhere from Cranberry Jam, for Turkey Wellington, where do I get it???  Can I use Cranberry Sauce or Jelly???

Thanks
Carole

Welcome to the forum Carole, smile
I am not sure which country that you live in and so its hard to recomend a product. ( I live in the UK )

I never use bought cranberry sauce but I had to tip some Ocean Spry cranberry jelly out of jars recently for someone else and I was amazed how dense the 'jelly' was .
To me it looked like it would not melt .
It was not like the redcurrent jelly that we can buy here , which is clear and fairly soft set.
The cranberry 'jelly ' that I used was opaque and fairly dense textures , I mashed it uo to make it easier to seperate between some dishes.

So if you are in the UK that might be worth looking at.

OK I have seen the episode today where he uses the Cranberry Jam ... it looked like simple cranberry sauce to me !
I think that he just calls it Jam as its more of a Jam texture than a runny sauce texture.

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#647 Sat 22 Dec 12 11:44pm

Em1983

Member
Member since Sat 22 Dec 12

Re: Ask me a cooking question

Hi I can't seem to find the recipe I recently saw being made on tv  sad .
It was a chocolate Christmas bomb type cake mad using popcorn fruit chocolate and many other items. My boys have asked if we can make it would appreciate any help in finding the recipe please ? X

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#648 Sun 23 Dec 12 2:35am

Ashen

Forum champ
Occupation Why is the Rum always gone???!
From out to lunch
Member since Sat 07 Jan 06

Re: Ask me a cooking question

macca58 wrote:

Hi Jamie, I have an Australian question. When you say to rest the Christmas turkey for 2 hours, that sounds fine in England where it's cold but it is really ok to leave a turkey on the bench for 2 hours in Australia in summer??
Thanks for your shows and books,
have a Merry Christmas,
Fiona xx

hippytea wrote:

macca58 - I'm not a food scientist, but I really don't see a problem there. Even in the UK a turkey rested for 2 hours is still hot when you eat it, and a higher ambient temperature will mean it will hold its heat for longer.

If it really bothers you, leave a meat thermometer in it so you can monitor the temperature - as long as it stays above 60C, it's out of the danger zone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danger_zon … _safety%29); if it drops below, the rule is it shouldn't be kept at that temp for more than 4 hours. And you don't have to rest for the full 2 hours if you're not happy with that, 1 will do.

Make sure you refrigerate leftovers immediately after carving. I would say get leftover meat off the bone and cover with stock or gravy before refrigerating, it will make it cool down faster and stop it drying out. It freezes well like that, too.

Khun wrote:

Hi Fiona,

Hippytea is right! Remember that when your turkey is cooked it also means that your turkey is sterile! So there's no bacteria, moulds or whatever in/ on the turkey when you take it out of the oven.

As long as the turkey is above 60 degree Celsius your meat is safe and remains free of (most) bacteria. But I assume the turkey is quite big (we don't have big turkeys here in the Netherlands) and that it will take a long time for the temperature to drop below 60 degree Celsius.

When the temperature drops below 60 degree Celsius bacteria and moulds start to settle on the turkey again and start to grow. How does it get contaminated?: air and direct contact (hands, knives, plates and such). Just make sure the tools you use are clean and the kitchen area where you let your turkey rest is clean. Don't worry too much though, it takes millions of bacteria per square cm to make you ill and only a small percentage of the bacteria and moulds are capable to do that (and are easily outmatched by those that don't make you ill, but give a 'weird' / rotten flavour to the meat).

Make sure that you don't leave the leftovers too long out of the fridge however. Leftovers are generally cut to smaller pieces (and thus contaminated via the knives, plates, hands and such) and most bacteria love temperatures of about 15-35 degree Celsius. So make sure you cool them quickly.

Greetz

A couple of points of clarification.

Danger Zone time is cumulative .

4 hrs is for the entire time the meat has been exposed to the danger zone , not just after cooking.

if you have brought it up to room temp before roasting , then that time is also included.  If it was fresh, then the amount of time it was in the car from the store refrigeration to your home etc .    There is a sliding scale here though.   4 hrs at 30 C  is a different thing than 4 hrs at 10 C , but recommendations don't take that into account because they always err on the side of caution.

Secondly,  meat that has been cooked may have little to no active bacteria , but ( and this is a big but) their can be leftover toxins in the meat produced by bacteria before it was cooked that are extremely heat stable and not destroyed by cooking. This can give you food poisoning just as easily as active bacteria. In fact a large amount of food poisoning is due to enterotoxin produced by  Clostridium perfringens.   The enterotoxin can withstand temps up to 74C .


this is also the basis for the recommendation not to reheat meat more than once.    The toxins continue to build up with each heating  cooling cycle

Last edited by Ashen (Sun 23 Dec 12 2:35am)


Only a fool argues with a skunk, a mule or a cook.  { cowboy saying}
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#649 Sun 23 Dec 12 9:54am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Ask me a cooking question

But that is not affected by the room temperature after roasting. If the meat has been properly handled before roasting, it is not going to give you food poisoning when it is still hot.

The question was whether it is safe to rest the meat at a high ambient temperature. In fact it should be safer than resting at a low ambient temperature, as the meat will hold its heat for longer and is more likely to stay out of the danger zone during the resting time.

Thanks for the clarification on the four hour period. If macca58 is careful to handle and store the meat properly before cooking, and to chill the leftovers right away after carving, there should be no problem.

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#650 Sun 23 Dec 12 11:43pm

Rathleague

Member
Member since Sun 23 Dec 12

Re: Ask me a cooking question

Hi
I saw Jamie make the Sneaker's Ice cream on TV a few days ago but I cant find the recipe online on channel 4 web site. If anyone has it with the method, please email it to me saintbernards@rathleague. com Cheers and thanks smile

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