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#1 Sun 06 Jan 13 11:00pm

Loztastique

Member
Occupation Something in the public sector
From Lancashire, UK
Member since Wed 01 Sep 10

Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

Ok, here is a dilema for you all - and I was wondering what you thought

I have always been a big supporter or local, independant shops and farmers, but the butcher at our local market who stocked free-range, wild-food and game has closed down (his packets of joined wild duck were a regular in my kitchen)

Now, the local butcher doesn't stock any organic or free range stock - if I want to get any of that, I have to get it wrapped in plastic from the supermarket.  But, I am a firm believer of "use it or loose it" for local butchers. 

So, the choice is - local butcher but less good quality meat, or supermarket products that hurt farmers, and have a limited choice, but higher welfare

Or, move to another town?

(and, I don't trust ordering meat online, I live on my own, and so delivery would be a nightmare)

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#2 Sun 06 Jan 13 11:34pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

Welcome to the  Loztastique   big_smile

I buy some meat from the butchers, some from the farmers markets and I also sometimes buy meat frm the supermarket , it depends what I am doing and where I am at the tiime, what time frame I have etc etc.

Farmers markets usually have some good organic meat suppliers but these are also packed in plastic wrapping , this is for hygine of transportation and selling safely.

I have to say that moving town does seem a bit excessive and expensive .
I suppose one solution is to eat more vegetarian meals and just eat better meat when you can find it.
It is however worth culturing a raport with  your local butcher as he might well be able to sorce some organic or free range meat for you .

Here is a link to farmers markets in Lancashire
http://www.visitlancashire.com/food-and … rkets/?p=1

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#3 Mon 07 Jan 13 9:37am

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

I would personally go for a mix of using your butcher (who, as Mummza said, could well be prepared to go the extra mile for you and source some of the meat you require) and the organic free-range meats from the supermarket. 

For me, the difficulty lies in GMO feed for animals, which is now (very sadly) legal in the UK and doesn't have to be declared (also legal  angry  ).  Most of the supermarkets and butchers haven't a clue about which animals are fed this, and the only way to avoid it is to either buy directly from your local farmer (which I now do, and I can therefore know the history of each animal, see the pastures it fed on and see what feed - if any - it ate, as well as find out about medication) or to buy organic produce from whichever place you can.  I bet if you were to ask around at your farmers market, someone would be able to point you in the right direction, although you might have to "cow-pool" to make it worthwhile!

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#4 Mon 07 Jan 13 10:05am

Maree

Forum champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

Interesting topic.

I am mainly vegetarian but when I want or need to buy meat (eg when my omnivore children are visiting, I  tend to do Mummza and Olivia do and mix things up between the farmers' markets and the supermarket. I do have a preferred independent butcher but I don't patronise him enough (due to being mainly vegetarian) to make it worthwhile for him to source and buy in for me.

Thank you for raising such an important issue thumbsup


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#5 Mon 07 Jan 13 10:42am

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

godness Olivia, I had not thought about GM foods being fed to the cattle.
Is the gluten intolorance that very sensative ?
It must make a total nightmare if you want to go away or eat out .

It was only recently that I realised the effect that GM crops might have on a person suffering from a gluten intollerence or gluten allergy ( I put it both ways as some refer to one way and others to the other !),
I was wanting to cook something that was quick to cook and could be enjoyed by al but mainly for a particular old  lady with a gluten allergy, I decided flap jacks would fit the bill and then discovered id have to sorce oats from GM free crops.
I had never relised this before that point.

I definatly did not realise the same proble could apply to meat ... what a noghtmare !

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#6 Mon 07 Jan 13 11:11am

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

Have you tried the veg and meat boxes, delivered to your door?  Our supplier supplies only organic foods.  OK, it's more expensive but at least you know what you're eating.  Our supplier will answer any questions which helps to put your mind at rest.  The veg is so fresh - harvested no longer than 48 hrs prior to supply.  We use this method every fortnight.  Couldn't keep up with all the stuff in just a week.  To have such fresh veg, still squeaking from the dew and real mud on some of the root veg, you know that it hasn't gone through the so called 'washing' process. 
I'm all for it.

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#7 Mon 07 Jan 13 4:27pm

oliviascotland

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Wed 06 Apr 05

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

mummza wrote:

godness Olivia, I had not thought about GM foods being fed to the cattle.
Is the gluten intolorance that very sensative ?

Thankfully it's not the gluten issue, but rather the fact that I despise the underhand methods of forcing food onto a population before adequate testing has been done (and whatever anyone says, I cannot believe that testing by the companies producing the foods is going to be anything other than biased!), and without informing us or giving the choice.  There is increasing evidence emerging that GMOs may not be optimal for humans or other animals, and I'd really like to keep them out of my food chain as much as possible!

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#8 Mon 07 Jan 13 7:06pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

This might be of help to shoppers in the U.S. trying to avoid GMOs in foods:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/2345138/Green … OFree-Food

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#9 Tue 08 Jan 13 10:35pm

bentpenny

Member
From CANADA
Member since Wed 09 May 07

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

You might consider looking to a local farmer.  You might be able to get into a group where they might split the meat between a few people.  We try to eat mostly meat that we have hunted, but certain things we get local. We get mostly pig.  There are only two of us in the house so we try to get groups together.  Its scarey to think about what goes on with the meat u might find in big chain food stores.  Good luck.

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#10 Tue 08 Jan 13 11:49pm

Lindy Fullarton

Member
Member since Tue 08 Jan 13

Re: Local and Independant OR Free-Range from the supermarket

I've just signed on as a member and have been wading through the posts and one thing is now obviously clear to me  -  Just how lucky I am to live where I am and do what I do. 

We have a small, organic farm (Kelowna) in the foothills of the Otway Ranges in south west Victoria, Australia.  We grow Aberdeen Angus for the restaurant sector, tend our historic orchard, home grown eggs, an ever increasing vegetable patch, citrus grove, nut grove and berry patch.  It is all organically tended and the cattle are supplemented with any excess nuts, fruit and citrus.  They are raised in a loving environment and we don't use dogs, prods or any nasty tricks.  They just come when we call them.

We do have an english connection however.  Much of the orchard was planted back in 1890 with the rootstock and seeds coming from Queen Victorias home garden at Windsor Castle.  Original owner was a botanist who studied in the UK. According to our records which were handed down when we purchased the farm 5 years ago, QV loved her Quinces and those trees (5) of them are still happily producing today.

I digress so I'll state my suggestion.  Quite a few folk over here jointly purchase a cow or sheep and have it "processed" by a chosen butcher who prepares it and apportions it and then it's up to you to collect it in your containers so as to avoid the plastic wrap etc.  There must be a growing number of organic producers in the UK and you can usually purchase a beast directly from them.  This exercise also can be quite cost effective for the purchasers.

cheers 
Lindy   smile

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