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#11 Sat 26 Jan 13 11:46am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Burns Night!

Just to add, you should read this:

http://crockpot365.blogspot.co.uk/2008/ … ecipe.html

It has a hilarious story of the blogger (who is in the USA) attempting to make haggis in the traditional way, followed by an entirely sensible recipe for an offal-free haggis.

Seriously, her butcher should probably be in jail. Lungs are not legal for sale as food in the States, and what he sourced for her is clearly a medical sample, not fresh, and not fit to be consumed. If you live in the States, don't try this at home! But it's a good laugh.

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#12 Sat 26 Jan 13 12:46pm

koukouvagia

Forum champ
From New York
Member since Fri 12 Dec 08

Re: Burns Night!

wine~o wrote:

koukouvagia wrote:

What is Burns night?

In honour of Scotlands greatest poet...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Burns

Of course I know who Robert Burns is, I'm asking if Burn's Night is a special type of celebration?  What does one do on Burn's Night?

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#13 Sat 26 Jan 13 2:03pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Burns Night!

as far as I know its about the poetry readings and the Haggis  (which is usually served with neeps n' tatties ).

I beleive that at larger gatherings the Haggis gets piped in by a piper playing the bagpipes , not sure when in the proceedings the Address to a Haggis is said but I think its after the piper has piped in the Haggis , and I thiink there is a special opening of the Hagis. I am sure Olivia or Hippytea will put us all straight on the correct procedures and order .

Address To A Haggis

1786
Type: Address

    Fair fa' your honest, sonsie face,
    Great chieftain o' the pudding-race!
    Aboon them a' yet tak your place,
    Painch, tripe, or thairm:
    Weel are ye wordy o'a grace
    As lang's my arm.

    The groaning trencher there ye fill,
    Your hurdies like a distant hill,
    Your pin was help to mend a mill
    In time o'need,
    While thro' your pores the dews distil
    Like amber bead.

    His knife see rustic Labour dight,
    An' cut you up wi' ready sleight,
    Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
    Like ony ditch;
    And then, O what a glorious sight,
    Warm-reekin', rich!

    Then, horn for horn, they stretch an' strive:
    Deil tak the hindmost! on they drive,
    Till a' their weel-swall'd kytes belyve
    Are bent like drums;
    Then auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
    Bethankit! hums.

    Is there that owre his French ragout
    Or olio that wad staw a sow,
    Or fricassee wad make her spew
    Wi' perfect sconner,
    Looks down wi' sneering, scornfu' view
    On sic a dinner?

    Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
    As feckles as wither'd rash,
    His spindle shank, a guid whip-lash;
    His nieve a nit;
    Thro' blody flood or field to dash,
    O how unfit!

    But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
    The trembling earth resounds his tread.
    Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
    He'll mak it whissle;
    An' legs an' arms, an' hands will sned,
    Like taps o' trissle.

    Ye Pow'rs, wha mak mankind your care,
    And dish them out their bill o' fare,
    Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
    That jaups in luggies;
    But, if ye wish her gratefu' prayer
    Gie her a haggis!

Last edited by mummza (Sat 26 Jan 13 2:05pm)

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#14 Sat 26 Jan 13 3:30pm

wine~o

Forum champ
Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: Burns Night!

koukouvagia wrote:

What is Burns night?

koukouvagia wrote:

Of course I know who Robert Burns is, I'm asking if Burn's Night is a special type of celebration?  What does one do on Burn's Night?

And I'm supposed to know that you know who Robert Burns is??

If you'd asked the second question first, I'd have given a different answer.

To quote well known Scottish saying

"Go stick your head in a bucket"... tongue

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#15 Sat 26 Jan 13 3:45pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Burns Night!

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#16 Sun 27 Jan 13 1:14pm

koukouvagia

Forum champ
From New York
Member since Fri 12 Dec 08

Re: Burns Night!

wine~o wrote:

koukouvagia wrote:

What is Burns night?

koukouvagia wrote:

Of course I know who Robert Burns is, I'm asking if Burn's Night is a special type of celebration?  What does one do on Burn's Night?

And I'm supposed to know that you know who Robert Burns is??

If you'd asked the second question first, I'd have given a different answer.

To quote well known Scottish saying

"Go stick your head in a bucket"... tongue

How rude and unkind and very not helpful.  You answered the question "Who is Robert Burns" which I did not ask.  I asked "What is Burns night?" 

Thanks Mummza.  I've never actually seen or eaten haggis, nor do I know anyone that has.  But right now I am picturing a piper piping haggis the way a baker pipes decorations on a cake.  But I'm not willing to bet I'm right lol.

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#17 Sun 27 Jan 13 4:27pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Burns Night!

The correct phrase is "awa and bile yer heid". A bucket would be an inappropriate vessel - even a galvanised bucket would be too thin-based, I would think. A large stockpot would be better suited. How one goes about boiling one's own head is not generally specified, I suppose you could use any suitable heat source.

koukouvagia, I like the image of piping decorations on a haggis! But no, the haggis is carried into the venue, escorted by a bagpiper playing traditional Scottish tunes. The phrase "piping in" is also used for weddings or other formal events where the couple or VIP is escorted by a piper piping. All rather grand, and rather loud.

The address is given when the haggis has been placed on the table, and the haggis is cut open at verse 3, at the point where you say "cut you up".

The whole thing makes me laugh, especially when people do it in all seriousness as if it was some kind of solemn ritual. The poem is meant to be funny - an ode to a fairly ordinary, ubiquitous dish - and I'm sure Burns was laughing when he wrote it. Of course he was in earnest when he compares it with a ragout, olio or fricassee and sets it above them all - he was - but he was also contrasting it with these fancy dishes, because a haggis is ordinary, unpretentious food, eaten as much by crofters as lairds, and nobody would ever consider it fancy. That's his point, and that's the joke, too.

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#18 Sun 27 Jan 13 4:55pm

wine~o

Forum champ
Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: Burns Night!

Thanks Hippytea
and sorry koukouvagia for being less than helpful.....

obviously I meant to say "awa and bile yer heid"

lol

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#19 Sun 27 Jan 13 5:18pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Burns Night!

koukouvagia wrote:

Thanks Mummza.  I've never actually seen or eaten haggis, nor do I know anyone that has.  But right now I am picturing a piper piping haggis the way a baker pipes decorations on a cake.  But I'm not willing to bet I'm right lol.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?num=10& … &tbo=d

Now quite how you imagined it koukouvagia  lol

http://www.visitscotland.com/about/robe … s-involved

Haggis
https://www.google.co.uk/search?num=10& … mp;bih=652

Last edited by mummza (Sun 27 Jan 13 5:20pm)

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#20 Sun 27 Jan 13 11:09pm

koukouvagia

Forum champ
From New York
Member since Fri 12 Dec 08

Re: Burns Night!

Wow, good to know.  Any thing that leads to a celebration is ok by me.  Wineo don't be an "eejit."

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