forum: Food & Drink

Subscribe to forums RSS

#11 Tue 29 Jan 13 3:59pm

Jamie's Food Team

Member
Member since Mon 21 Jan 13

Re: A season for Italy

mummza wrote:

I am well aware that each shape of pasta has a type of sauce that should , please can you get the food team to chat about the different shapes of pasta and the different sauces that are generally served with the pasta

Hi Mummza,

There are many, many different types of pasta out there Ė and it would be hard knowing where to begin. I think the best approach would be to mention a few styles of pasta and which sauces work with which rather than discussing every type (otherwise we would be here forever). But even Jamie would agree that these are more like guidelines Ė there is no right or wrong, itís completely up to the individual and balancing textures and flavours. Food has developed so much in recent years and people are experimenting with all sorts traditional ways of eating pasta has changed. There are four main groups of pasta:

1. Shapely, short cut pasta Ė small with grooves and crevices. A few examples of this style of pasta are: orecchiette, shell, penne, farfalle, fusilli, rigatoni, campenelle, strozzapreti. These decorative shapes are traditionally used with chunky sauces as they catch all the gorgeous juices and lumps in their outer grooves, twists, turns and crevices.

2. Long pasta and ribbon cut pasta such as tagliatelle, papperdelle, fetuccini, linguini, lasagne, spaghetti are great for thinner sauces such as carbonara, pesto, slow cooked ragu.

3.  Minute or small pastas such as Fregola, orzo, anelli which are typically used in soups and stews as fillers.

4. Stuffed pastas such as ravioli, tortellini, tortelloni. These donít need a huge amount of extra flavour as they are often stuffed with rich fillings so a usually eaten with thinner and plainer sauced such as Beurre noisette and sage, olive oil and parmesan, pesto, buttery wild mushrooms.

Pasta is very hard to categorize as you will find that in Italy the rules change from one village to the next so really, the only rule is if it tastes nice, eat it.

    Likes (0)

#12 Tue 29 Jan 13 4:29pm

wine~o

Forum champ
Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: A season for Italy

koukouvagia wrote:

I agree Maree.  Here in the states Italian food is pizza, lasagna, meatballs and thick red sauce.!

What...No Rissotto....You can't get more Italian than Risotto (Sp?)

Edit...now where is that risotto thread.... mrgreen

Last edited by wine~o (Tue 29 Jan 13 4:30pm)

    Likes (0)

#13 Tue 29 Jan 13 5:46pm

Grandmadamada

Forum champ
Member since Fri 19 Nov 10

Re: A season for Italy

I could comment every post but ....... grazie for thinking such wonders about us cool  oops  lol

..... each ingredient shines ..... quoting Kouko ..... that's the way I like it crossed

risotto??? every time I do it my husband opens a discussion on it's best time of cooking help

Last edited by Grandmadamada (Tue 29 Jan 13 5:48pm)

    Likes (0)

#14 Tue 29 Jan 13 6:50pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: A season for Italy

Have found out the wonderful Ristorante Caprese, which was closed down to make way for some stupid shopping centre (another one? They can't let the space in the ones we've already got!) has re-opened as Don Constanzo in the West End of Glasgow! I am very happy. Will be booking a table as soon as I get home from holiday!

    Likes (0)

#15 Tue 29 Jan 13 9:58pm

Maree

Forum champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: A season for Italy

koukouvagia wrote:

I agree Maree.  Here in the states Italian food is pizza, lasagna, meatballs and thick red sauce.  Italian-american cooking is very different than real Italian food.  Here in NY they call marinara "gravy" which is a little disturbing.  And they make "Sunday sauce" which is a meaty marinara with meatballs, sausage and pork spare ribs in it.  If a dish is not swimming in gravy it ain't italian.

Eating food in Italy is really different.  It's very simple no-fuss food.  Each ingredient shines.  And not every dish is slathered in red sauce!  Sometimes there's no red sauce

Here, for most places/ people "marinara" equals (incorrectly) seafood hmm. I loathe red sauce bathing everything.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
    Likes (0)

#16 Wed 30 Jan 13 1:39am

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: A season for Italy

Great topic, Italian food is simple, that does not mean it is rubbish.  Quite the opposite. With Italian food there is nowhere to hide, the ingredients must be good. Good does not have to be expensive.  My clams and cockles are free, its quiet labour intensive to get them. With some quality pasta, garlic, wine, they are amazing.  Clam Garlic Tomato is my favourite recipe, not sure if its Italian, it should be.
I found an  old British cookbook with similar philosophies. Stews with four ingredients in them, the book was very old, when all butchers were as they should be and  supermarkets were nonexistent.
An Italian Deli called www.linastores.co.uk has been around since 1944. Itís in Soho, a superb place. Suggs from Madness informed me of its existence. Thatís  Italian food, loved by so many.
On TV. Nonno Contaldo was picking mussels at the age of 96. That shows Italian food to me. Passion for the ingredients and where they are from. Itís Time to revisit his recipe and the beach.
I think Jamieís Italy is one of the best cook books ever.  I was amazed that zuppa di baccala was really enjoyed by all, including my non foodie friends, I loved it from day one. Hunters Lasgne, is one of my favourite meals.
Our  last visit to Italy, was amazing. Fennel /tomatoes and more growing everywhere. Superb delis, Butchers and greengrocers, we were treated like locals, not like tourists. I found the produce in the shops amazing, some of the restaurants were not so good. Our visits to Spain also had this.
Ascoli gave us the best olive oil ever. San Bernadetto and Gottamare, the best Pizza.   Gottamare has a fantastic butchers up the hill. The best ox tail we have ever had, serving us the fat end not the thin end. Meat properly hung.
Tonight we had Mutton Kidneys Using an  Italian recipe: Marsala wine lemon and zest  beef stock. Again simple, but the best ingredients. 
Risotto is a never ending story; I love Risotto, time to visit the risotto thread.

Last edited by @nGoose1 (Wed 30 Jan 13 1:45am)

    Likes (0)

#17 Wed 30 Jan 13 1:44am

@nGoose1

Forum champ
Occupation Shop worker/KP/ Commis chef
From UK/Germany
Member since Wed 28 Oct 09

Re: A season for Italy

Sounds like a good book. Italian Delis are also perhaps good places to tap in to such info
www.linastores.co.uk

mummza wrote:

I am well aware that each shape of pasta has a type of sauce that should , please can you get the food team to chat about the different shapes of pasta and the different sauces that are generally served with the pasta

there is a great book caled 'Pasta by Design' by George L. Legendre
that not only explains the geometary of the different shapes but mentions what type of sauce is served with it.

Its a great book and I realy enjoy looking at it.

    Likes (0)

#18 Wed 30 Jan 13 10:07am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: A season for Italy

koukouvagia wrote:

Boy do I hate Italians though!  It freaks me out that they get to eat so much pasta and stay so fashionably skinny!  How do they do it?

Do you include Antonio Carluccio in this?

    Likes (0)

#19 Wed 30 Jan 13 10:08am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: A season for Italy

Thistledo wrote:

Hippytea.  What a beautifully written 'piece'.  A start of a novel perhaps?  Thoroughly enjoyed reading that.  Thank you.

Thank you for your kind words, Thistledo! I'm glad you enjoyed reading it.

    Likes (0)

#20 Wed 30 Jan 13 1:14pm

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: A season for Italy

koukouvagia - have you ever been to Italy?  A wonderfully musical place and they are so family orientated.  I loved my stay there.  It's a real fun place to visit.

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB