forum: Food & Drink

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#1 Mon 25 Feb 13 1:43pm

Tomato1

Member
Member since Mon 25 Feb 13

Hot Peppers

Does anyone have any thoughts on the culinary value of hot peppers, not just the heat but the subtle flavours and aromas available in the diverse range available to us. I am currently involved in breeding hot peppers for the Northern European climate and see tremendous potential for new recipes to be developed using specific hot peppers.
The Royal Horticultural Society will run a trial of hot peppers for use in smaller pots and patio containers this year and I hope that the culinary aspects of the varieties being tested will be given some assessment. The trial will be run at two locations, in Sussex and Yorkshire, so that variety performance across the country can be established.

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#2 Mon 25 Feb 13 2:30pm

Thistledo

Member
Occupation Retired something or other
From English immigrant in S. Wales
Member since Fri 07 Dec 12

Re: Hot Peppers

I would welcome it Tom.  I bought a kit from a garden centre a couple of years ago, comprising an attractive pot, compost and dwarf red chilli seeds.  A huge success, grown on my sunny windowsill in the kitchen.  Very attractive and I still have some of the harvest in a jar.

Anything where we can grow in a pot would be welcome.

Bring it on!

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#3 Mon 25 Feb 13 4:44pm

Tomato1

Member
Member since Mon 25 Feb 13

Re: Hot Peppers

That's great! I reckon it's worth gathering at the West Dean Chilli Fiesta in August for those who are chilli gourmets. It's the varieties of chilli with slightly larger plants that also interest me such as the Aji types and also varieties like inidad perfume, an extremely attractive tropical perfumed flavour under the heat.

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#4 Mon 25 Feb 13 5:31pm

wine~o

Forum champ
Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: Hot Peppers

Google "Dorset Naga"

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#5 Mon 25 Feb 13 5:36pm

Tomato1

Member
Member since Mon 25 Feb 13

Re: Hot Peppers

Ah yes, that's my point! Should Dorset Naga even be seen as a culinary pepper? All heat and no flavour is one approach but I think the flavours are so much more important.

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#6 Mon 25 Feb 13 5:45pm

wine~o

Forum champ
Occupation Handyman
From Dorset u.k
Member since Tue 21 Oct 08

Re: Hot Peppers

I don't think it's as hot as claimed...Apparently, you are supposed to handle it wearing gloves...and chop it outside to stop your eyes watering.....

Yet there is a you tube video where the original growers son picks 700+ chillies from one plant without any protection...

I've grown chillies (Not particularly hot ones) from seed outdoors here in Dorset..you do need a good summer though..the last 3 years have been too cool or wet for outdoor growing/ripening...greenhouse needed....same with tomatoes..

Edit...There's another chilli freak who posts on here from time to time...think he's from Devon?? goes by the name of "ThehotJuan" or similar...bet he would be interested in this thread..

Last edited by wine~o (Mon 25 Feb 13 5:47pm)

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#7 Mon 25 Feb 13 11:40pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Hot Peppers

I grow mine year round (now) in pots but previously in the garden. (Sorry) wink.


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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#8 Tue 26 Feb 13 1:18am

beerforyorky

Forum champ
Occupation Retired
From Surin, N.E. Thailand
Member since Mon 29 Dec 08

Re: Hot Peppers

I have grown "prik kee noo" in pots here with some success (the 'soil' is not perfect) but really, when they are available in the markets at 2 bob a bucket full, there seems little point. A variety that is not available locally is the very dark green jalapeno. That one I'd like to grow if I can get hold of the seeds.

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#9 Tue 26 Feb 13 9:13pm

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Hot Peppers

A guy I worked with grew chilli peppers from seed, and brought a few plants into the office (it was a pretty bohemian working environment). Eventually the office manager got sick of them sprawling about the windowsill and cutting out the light, and threw them all out.

Several weeks later (the landlord had gone bust and the rubbish was not being collected) we noticed the plants still sticking out of the dumpster, still green, and with big fat ripe chillies on them!

Apparently they thrive on stress. The more stress, the more capsaicin ends up in the fruit. If anyone had picked those chillies, they would have been pretty strong, I reckon!

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#10 Tue 26 Feb 13 9:21pm

Maree

Forum super champ
From Newcastle, Australia
Member since Sat 10 Mar 07

Re: Hot Peppers

A lot of herbs and spices thrive on stress.

Many years ago, I gave a selection of herbs to a friend. She "babied" them. They died. I explained that in their original/natural environment they had to struggle. They (rosemary, thyme and oregano were some I'd given) grew in poor soil and in rugged terrain. That seemed to ring true with her. Chillies are the same. If they get too much water etc they don't bear as many fruit (or so I've found). Maybe it's "survival of the fittest" and the need to reproduce. Don't know ...


"Cook with love and laughter ..."
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