JFC (Jamie’s fried chicken)

Fried Chicken

Serves 4

  • 800 g sweet potatoes

  • olive oil

  • 2 heaped tablespoons fine cornmeal or polenta

  • 1 x 1.8 kg whole higher-welfare chicken

  • 1 heaped tablespoon Cajun seasoning

  • 4 cloves of garlic

  • 2 carrots

  • 1 apple

  • ¼ of a white cabbage

  • 1 small red onion

  • 1 heaped teaspoon English mustard

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

  • 3 heaped tablespoons fat-free natural yoghurt

  • 130 g ciabatta or stale bread

  • 2 heaped tablespoons plain flour

  • 4 frozen mini corn on the cobs

The love of chicken in a bucket up and down the UK is clear to see. I got a bucket for four people and it cost over £16 with a couple of sides, so I thought, let's give you a tasty, homemade version. I've upgraded the chicken, given you veggie sides in an exciting way, including a veg-packed slaw, and you should save about £3. Enjoy JFC.



Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Scrub the sweet potatoes clean, slice into wedges, toss in a tray with a little olive oil, 1 heaped tablespoon of cornmeal or polenta and a pinch of salt and pepper, then put aside. Cut up your chicken (see my tips on how to joint a chicken below – you'll need to split the legs into thighs and drumsticks for this recipe as described in step 8), then remove and discard the skin and lay the pieces on a large baking tray. Add the remaining cornmeal or polenta, a good lug of olive oil and the Cajun seasoning to the tray, squash over half the garlic through a garlic crusher, then toss and massage to coat the chicken. Place on the top shelf of the oven, pop the wedges underneath and cook for 20 minutes.



Meanwhile, coarsely grate the carrots, apple, cabbage and peeled onion in a food processor. Tip into a bowl and mix with the mustard, extra virgin olive oil, vinegar and yoghurt, then season to perfection and put aside. Peel the remaining garlic and whiz in the food processor, then pulse in the bread and a good lug of olive oil until you have fine breadcrumbs. Tip on to a tray. In a bowl, mix the flour with 4 tablespoons of water to make a paste.



When the time's up, remove the chicken from the oven, then carefully brush the pieces with the flour paste and use tongs to firmly press them in the breadcrumbs until they're all evenly coated. Return the tray to the bottom of the oven, quickly turn the wedges and cook for a further 40 minutes, or until the chicken and sweet potatoes are golden and cooked through. Meanwhile, grill the frozen corn on a hot griddle pan for around 15 minutes, or until hot through and charred, turning occasionally. Take everything to the table, get excited and dig in.



Jamie's Top Tip: How to joint a chicken Knowing how to joint a chicken is a really brilliant skill to have. Don't be scared - it's super simple, and you can buy a whole chicken for just a little bit more than the cost of two chicken breasts. Plus, you have the benefit of the drumsticks, thighs, wings and carcass to do many other delicious things with too, so it can be very economical. Please give it a go – all you need is a plastic chopping board (put a damp cloth underneath to secure it) and sharp chopping knife, and you're away.



Here's what to do:



1. Use your chopping knife to cut the skin between the breast and the leg.



2. Lever the leg away from the carcass, until the bone pops out of the socket.



3. Use the tip of the knife to cut the leg away from the carcass, angling the tip towards the carcass so you get as much meat on the leg as possible.



4. Use the heel of the knife to chop down through the joint of the wing.



5. Feel the breastbone down the centre of the bird, then use the middle of the knife to cut vertically along it, to separate the breast from the bone.



6. Use the tip of your knife to cut between the breast meat and the carcass, slightly angling the knife towards the carcass in a stroking action.



7. Cut down between the breast and the carcass to remove the breast, angling the knife towards the carcass to ensure the breast is as meaty as possible.



8. Repeat all these steps for the other side of the bird. You can leave the legs whole, or cut them into thighs and drumsticks. To do this, use the middle of the knife to cut firmly in one confident movement through the joint at the natural bend of the leg. Save the carcass for making stock.

Nutritional Information

JFC (Jamie’s fried chicken)

With sweet potato wedges and crunchy slaw

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0 foodies cooked this
My homemade fried chicken recipe is crispy, tasty and so much better than the shop-bought versions out there
Serves 4
1h 35m
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Method

The love of chicken in a bucket up and down the UK is clear to see. I got a bucket for four people and it cost over £16 with a couple of sides, so I thought, let's give you a tasty, homemade version. I've upgraded the chicken, given you veggie sides in an exciting way, including a veg-packed slaw, and you should save about £3. Enjoy JFC.

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas 5. Scrub the sweet potatoes clean, slice into wedges, toss in a tray with a little olive oil, 1 heaped tablespoon of cornmeal or polenta and a pinch of salt and pepper, then put aside. Cut up your chicken (see my tips on how to joint a chicken below – you'll need to split the legs into thighs and drumsticks for this recipe as described in step 8), then remove and discard the skin and lay the pieces on a large baking tray. Add the remaining cornmeal or polenta, a good lug of olive oil and the Cajun seasoning to the tray, squash over half the garlic through a garlic crusher, then toss and massage to coat the chicken. Place on the top shelf of the oven, pop the wedges underneath and cook for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, coarsely grate the carrots, apple, cabbage and peeled onion in a food processor. Tip into a bowl and mix with the mustard, extra virgin olive oil, vinegar and yoghurt, then season to perfection and put aside. Peel the remaining garlic and whiz in the food processor, then pulse in the bread and a good lug of olive oil until you have fine breadcrumbs. Tip on to a tray. In a bowl, mix the flour with 4 tablespoons of water to make a paste.

When the time's up, remove the chicken from the oven, then carefully brush the pieces with the flour paste and use tongs to firmly press them in the breadcrumbs until they're all evenly coated. Return the tray to the bottom of the oven, quickly turn the wedges and cook for a further 40 minutes, or until the chicken and sweet potatoes are golden and cooked through. Meanwhile, grill the frozen corn on a hot griddle pan for around 15 minutes, or until hot through and charred, turning occasionally. Take everything to the table, get excited and dig in.

Jamie's Top Tip: How to joint a chicken Knowing how to joint a chicken is a really brilliant skill to have. Don't be scared - it's super simple, and you can buy a whole chicken for just a little bit more than the cost of two chicken breasts. Plus, you have the benefit of the drumsticks, thighs, wings and carcass to do many other delicious things with too, so it can be very economical. Please give it a go – all you need is a plastic chopping board (put a damp cloth underneath to secure it) and sharp chopping knife, and you're away.

Here's what to do:

1. Use your chopping knife to cut the skin between the breast and the leg.

2. Lever the leg away from the carcass, until the bone pops out of the socket.

3. Use the tip of the knife to cut the leg away from the carcass, angling the tip towards the carcass so you get as much meat on the leg as possible.

4. Use the heel of the knife to chop down through the joint of the wing.

5. Feel the breastbone down the centre of the bird, then use the middle of the knife to cut vertically along it, to separate the breast from the bone.

6. Use the tip of your knife to cut between the breast meat and the carcass, slightly angling the knife towards the carcass in a stroking action.

7. Cut down between the breast and the carcass to remove the breast, angling the knife towards the carcass to ensure the breast is as meaty as possible.

8. Repeat all these steps for the other side of the bird. You can leave the legs whole, or cut them into thighs and drumsticks. To do this, use the middle of the knife to cut firmly in one confident movement through the joint at the natural bend of the leg. Save the carcass for making stock.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 893 45%
  • Carbs 92.1g 40%
  • Sugar 26.1g 29%
  • Fat 26.8g 38%
  • Saturates 5.7g 29%
  • Protein 62.7g 139%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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