Salmon filo pie

Serves 6

  • 3 leeks

  • 2 large courgettes

  • olive oil

  • 2 sprigs of fresh thyme

  • 200 g leftover cooked salmon

  • 100 g feta cheese

  • 1 lemon

  • 3 large free-range eggs

  • 1 x 250 g pack of filo pastry

  • 15 g Parmesan cheese

  • 1 romaine lettuce

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Trim and roughly chop the leeks and courgettes and place in a large pan on a low heat with a lug of olive oil and the thyme leaves. Cook gently for 30 minutes, or until soft and lightly golden, with the lid on for the first 5 minutes, stirring regularly. Once soft and sweet, season to perfection and leave aside to cool for 5 to 10 minutes.



Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. Flake the salmon into the cooled mixture, crumble in the feta, grate over the zest from the lemon, crack in the eggs and stir well to combine. Layer the filo over the base of a lightly oiled ovenproof frying pan or dish (roughly 30cm), overlapping the sheets and letting them hang over the edge of the pan as you layer – make sure you fully cover the base and allow enough overhang to fully cover the filling once folded in – brushing with olive oil as you go. Spoon in the salmon filling, then fold in the overhanging filo to form a lid. Brush the top with olive oil and finely grate over the Parmesan. Bake on the bottom shelf of the oven for 45 to 50 minutes, or until cooked through, golden and crisp.



Meanwhile, slice the lettuce and cucumber (I'm loving my crinkle cut knife – you should get one!). Mix the juice from the lemon, the extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper together, then drizzle over the salad veg.

Transfer the filo pie to a board, cut into wedges, and serve.

Nutritional Information

Method

Brilliant as a lunch or light dinner, this filo pie looks and tastes fantastic – crisp on the outside, flaky and soft in the middle. As well as salmon, we're also celebrating slow-cooked leeks and courgettes, which do amazing things when given time to get soft and sweet. They help stretch the salmon further and complement it perfectly.

Trim and roughly chop the leeks and courgettes and place in a large pan on a low heat with a lug of olive oil and the thyme leaves. Cook gently for 30 minutes, or until soft and lightly golden, with the lid on for the first 5 minutes, stirring regularly. Once soft and sweet, season to perfection and leave aside to cool for 5 to 10 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas 4. Flake the salmon into the cooled mixture, crumble in the feta, grate over the zest from the lemon, crack in the eggs and stir well to combine. Layer the filo over the base of a lightly oiled ovenproof frying pan or dish (roughly 30cm), overlapping the sheets and letting them hang over the edge of the pan as you layer – make sure you fully cover the base and allow enough overhang to fully cover the filling once folded in – brushing with olive oil as you go. Spoon in the salmon filling, then fold in the overhanging filo to form a lid. Brush the top with olive oil and finely grate over the Parmesan. Bake on the bottom shelf of the oven for 45 to 50 minutes, or until cooked through, golden and crisp.

Meanwhile, slice the lettuce and cucumber (I'm loving my crinkle cut knife – you should get one!). Mix the juice from the lemon, the extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper together, then drizzle over the salad veg.
Transfer the filo pie to a board, cut into wedges, and serve.

Tip

To make this pie extra cute, try tossing a few thyme sprigs in oil and scattering them over the filo before you bake it.
Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 449 22%
  • Carbs 34.3g 15%
  • Sugar 5.2g 6%
  • Fat 24.2g 35%
  • Saturates 6.1g 31%
  • Protein 21g 47%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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