Ile flottante

Serves 10

  • 800 g rhubarb, cut into 6cm pieces

  • 4 tbsp golden caster sugar, or to taste

  • zest and juice of 2 oranges

  • 500 ml whole milk

  • 500 ml double cream

  • 6 tbsp golden caster sugar

  • 1 vanilla pod, split, seeds scraped

  • 8 free-range egg yolks, 3 whites reserved for the meringues

  • 150 g caster sugar

  • 1.5 litres semi-skimmed milk

This classic French dessert's name means 'floating island' – it's a meringue island in a lake of custard. Despite what you might think, it's really easy to make. If you fancy a bit of crunch on the top, scatter it with some toasted almonds.



Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas 6. Place the rhubarb in an ovenproof dish along with the sugar and orange zest and juice. Cover with foil and roast in the oven for 15–20 minutes, or until softened – the cooking time may vary, depending on the thickness of your rhubarb. Taste it and add a little more sugar if you like.



Transfer the rhubarb to a plate, set aside, and pour the roasting juices into a pan. Boil it for a few minutes until it forms a thick syrup, then set this aside too.



To make the custard, pour the milk, cream, 4 tablespoons of the sugar and the vanilla pod and seeds into a pan over a medium heat. Bring it to the boil, stirring continuously, then remove from the heat and leave to cool slightly.



Place the egg yolks in a large bowl and beat in the remaining sugar to combine. Remove the vanilla pod from the milk, then slowly whisk the warm milk mixture into the yolks. Return the custard to the pan and place over a low heat for a few minutes, stirring continuously, until it coats the back of a spoon. Sieve it into a clean bowl, cover the surface with a layer of cling film to stop it forming a skin, and set aside.



Make the meringues by placing the egg whites in a clean bowl and beating them with an electric whisk until they form firm peaks. Continue whisking as you add the sugar, then turn up the mixer and whisk for about 7 minutes, or until they're white and glossy.



To poach the meringues, pour the milk into a wide, shallow saucepan over a medium heat and warm it through until it just begins to simmer. Float 3 or 4 heaped tablespoons of the meringue mixture on the hot milk, making sure they are well spaced out to allow them to expand. Cook for about 30 seconds, then turn over and cook for 30 seconds more, or until they're firm.



Using a slotted spoon, transfer the meringues to a plate lined with kitchen paper, to absorb any milk. Repeat with the remaining meringue mixture, discarding the milk once you've finished.



Spoon the custard into serving bowls, top with the roasted rhubarb – stirring a little for a rippled effect, if you like – then finish by placing a meringue island on top. Drizzle with rhubarb syrup and serve right away.

Nutritional Information

Ile flottante

With rockin’ rhubarb

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This classic French meringue dessert is so easy to make, but utterly decadent and really impressive
Serves 10
1h 10m
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Method

This classic French dessert's name means 'floating island' – it's a meringue island in a lake of custard. Despite what you might think, it's really easy to make. If you fancy a bit of crunch on the top, scatter it with some toasted almonds.

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas 6. Place the rhubarb in an ovenproof dish along with the sugar and orange zest and juice. Cover with foil and roast in the oven for 15–20 minutes, or until softened – the cooking time may vary, depending on the thickness of your rhubarb. Taste it and add a little more sugar if you like.

Transfer the rhubarb to a plate, set aside, and pour the roasting juices into a pan. Boil it for a few minutes until it forms a thick syrup, then set this aside too.

To make the custard, pour the milk, cream, 4 tablespoons of the sugar and the vanilla pod and seeds into a pan over a medium heat. Bring it to the boil, stirring continuously, then remove from the heat and leave to cool slightly.

Place the egg yolks in a large bowl and beat in the remaining sugar to combine. Remove the vanilla pod from the milk, then slowly whisk the warm milk mixture into the yolks. Return the custard to the pan and place over a low heat for a few minutes, stirring continuously, until it coats the back of a spoon. Sieve it into a clean bowl, cover the surface with a layer of cling film to stop it forming a skin, and set aside.

Make the meringues by placing the egg whites in a clean bowl and beating them with an electric whisk until they form firm peaks. Continue whisking as you add the sugar, then turn up the mixer and whisk for about 7 minutes, or until they're white and glossy.

To poach the meringues, pour the milk into a wide, shallow saucepan over a medium heat and warm it through until it just begins to simmer. Float 3 or 4 heaped tablespoons of the meringue mixture on the hot milk, making sure they are well spaced out to allow them to expand. Cook for about 30 seconds, then turn over and cook for 30 seconds more, or until they're firm.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the meringues to a plate lined with kitchen paper, to absorb any milk. Repeat with the remaining meringue mixture, discarding the milk once you've finished.

Spoon the custard into serving bowls, top with the roasted rhubarb – stirring a little for a rippled effect, if you like – then finish by placing a meringue island on top. Drizzle with rhubarb syrup and serve right away.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 476 24%
  • Carbs 38.6g 15%
  • Sugar 38g 42%
  • Fat 31g 44%
  • Saturates 17.7g 89%
  • Protein 9.5g 21%
Of an adult's reference intake

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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