Meat Terrines

Meat Terrines
 
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This recipe was uploaded
by chefzilla

 
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Ingredients

Ingredients
Method
 
Quick reference recipe:



Ham hock, boiled in water
wholegrain mustard
stock (the water the ham hock was cooked in)
salt

Step 1:
flake down the ham hock whilst still warm
Step2:
mix in the whole grain mustard and salt to taste, and a little of the stock to bind it together.

Step 3:
fill a terrine mould, or wrap the mixture in cling film tightly

Step 4:
leave in the fridge until set.

Explanation:

1: As described, flake down the meat while its still warm. this allows you to flake the meat better, as when it cools, it will be firmer and more resistant to your pulling it apart.
any slow cooked meat can be used for this, such as confit duck legs, or slow poached chicken. The reason the meat should be slow cooked is because it offers a much more tender texture, and can be more easily flaked. also, more tenders, prime cuts of meat are both expensive, and delicious cooked simply. please don't destroy a fillet of beef and turn it into a terrine! it will not taste nearly as nice i promise!
The ham hock should be cooked in water with basic white stock ingredient, IE: onions, celery, leek etc


2: here is the part where you season the mixture, and give it a little bit of stock, or confit oil if your doing a confit meat to help bind it together. you can also use butter for this if the meat your using wasn't cooked in oil or stock that will gel when chilled.
With the ham hock, we're going to add a little whole grain mustard and a little salt to taste.

3: Now to decide what shape you want your terrine to take. strictly speaking, a terrine should be formed in a terrine mould, which is a particular shape, and why what we are making is called a terrine... however, as different shaped terrine moulds have been mass produced, you will find the term now applies to the method, rather than the shape, so it can be whatever you want! line your mould with cling film and fill to the top.
if your wrapping in cling film, wrap tightly, leaving more than 1 hands width extra at each end. grab each end bit, hold tightly and roll away from you on the counter top so that the cling film twists and compacts the mixture. tie both ends, and then prick along the length with a knife. turn over and repeat.
The reason we prick the cling film is to allow any air bubbles to escape, giving us a tighter wrap, and a better end result.
Now wrap more cling film around it, making sure to stretch the cling film so when wrapped, it contract around the mix giving a tighter wrap.
Repeat the pricking and wrapping process a few times until you have a really good tight cylinder. on the last wrap, do not prick the cling film.

4: Leave in the fridge to set for at least 2-3 hours. preferably overnight. if your using a terrine mould, place another mould on top with a good weight on top of it to press the mixture so it compacts and maintains its shape when turned out and cut. then simply turn out, and cut to whatever size you like, and serve.
If using the cling film method, leave the cling film on, and just cut off however much you want. be sure to re-wrap the end just to stop it oxidizing. It wont need to be a tight wrap as its already set and will stay that way!


Happy cooking!

Meat Terrines

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alt

This recipe was uploaded by chefzilla

 
 
Hi guys!
Here's a quick meat terrine recipe to get you making those posh terrines and ballotines that you see in restaurants. Easy as pie to make, although there is a lot of waiting involved! I've described 2 methods of pressing the terrine as best i could so if you don't have terrine moulds... no problem! you can still use this recipe.

enjoy!

http://cookinginprinciple.blogspot.com/2010/11/meat-terrines.html

Method


Quick reference recipe:



Ham hock, boiled in water
wholegrain mustard
stock (the water the ham hock was cooked in)
salt

Step 1:
flake down the ham hock whilst still warm
Step2:
mix in the whole grain mustard and salt to taste, and a little of the stock to bind it together.

Step 3:
fill a terrine mould, or wrap the mixture in cling film tightly

Step 4:
leave in the fridge until set.

Explanation:

1: As described, flake down the meat while its still warm. this allows you to flake the meat better, as when it cools, it will be firmer and more resistant to your pulling it apart.
any slow cooked meat can be used for this, such as confit duck legs, or slow poached chicken. The reason the meat should be slow cooked is because it offers a much more tender texture, and can be more easily flaked. also, more tenders, prime cuts of meat are both expensive, and delicious cooked simply. please don't destroy a fillet of beef and turn it into a terrine! it will not taste nearly as nice i promise!
The ham hock should be cooked in water with basic white stock ingredient, IE: onions, celery, leek etc


2: here is the part where you season the mixture, and give it a little bit of stock, or confit oil if your doing a confit meat to help bind it together. you can also use butter for this if the meat your using wasn't cooked in oil or stock that will gel when chilled.
With the ham hock, we're going to add a little whole grain mustard and a little salt to taste.

3: Now to decide what shape you want your terrine to take. strictly speaking, a terrine should be formed in a terrine mould, which is a particular shape, and why what we are making is called a terrine... however, as different shaped terrine moulds have been mass produced, you will find the term now applies to the method, rather than the shape, so it can be whatever you want! line your mould with cling film and fill to the top.
if your wrapping in cling film, wrap tightly, leaving more than 1 hands width extra at each end. grab each end bit, hold tightly and roll away from you on the counter top so that the cling film twists and compacts the mixture. tie both ends, and then prick along the length with a knife. turn over and repeat.
The reason we prick the cling film is to allow any air bubbles to escape, giving us a tighter wrap, and a better end result.
Now wrap more cling film around it, making sure to stretch the cling film so when wrapped, it contract around the mix giving a tighter wrap.
Repeat the pricking and wrapping process a few times until you have a really good tight cylinder. on the last wrap, do not prick the cling film.

4: Leave in the fridge to set for at least 2-3 hours. preferably overnight. if your using a terrine mould, place another mould on top with a good weight on top of it to press the mixture so it compacts and maintains its shape when turned out and cut. then simply turn out, and cut to whatever size you like, and serve.
If using the cling film method, leave the cling film on, and just cut off however much you want. be sure to re-wrap the end just to stop it oxidizing. It wont need to be a tight wrap as its already set and will stay that way!


Happy cooking!
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