SOURDOUGH 'SANDWICH' LOAF

SOURDOUGH 'SANDWICH' LOAF
 
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by cengland

 
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Ingredients

Ingredients
Method
 
  • Note: There is a liquid starter recipe here:
  • http://www.jamieoliver.com:81/foodwise/article-view.php?id=4127
  • Ingredients
  • • 375mL warm but not hot water (+ extra)
  • • 150g liquid starter, or 75g dry-dough starter
  • • 750g flour (+ extra)
  • • 2 tb gluten flour
  • • 1 tb sunflower oil (or 20g butter, melted), optional
  • • 2 tb sugar
  • • 3 tsp salt
  • • a little butter to grease
  • Equipment
  • • scales (preferably ones that you can reset to 0 after putting something on them)
  • • large glass or ceramic mixing bowl
  • • wooden spoon
  • • rubber scraper
  • • a large plastic bag (clean shopping or garbage bag)
  • • bread tin or baking tray
  • • sharp knife
• Put the water in a large glass or ceramic bowl, and mix in the starter. If necessary, break up the starter and let it soak for a while, then mix it in with a whisk.
• Sift the flour and gluten flour together.
• Sift over 150g of the flour, and mix it in with a wooden spoon. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Cover loosely with a plastic bag, and leave in a warm place for about 1 hour.
• Sift over another 150g flour, and mix it in. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Cover again, and leave in a warm place for 2-3 hours. By then, the mixture should be forming bubbles.
• Sift over another 150g flour, and mix it in. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Again, cover, leaving room for the dough to expand, and leave in a warm place for 2-3 hours.
• Sift over another 150g flour, and mix it in. (Note: Wholemeal/wholewheat flours tend to soak up more liquid than white flours. If using some or all wholemeal flour for your bread, with this addition of flour you will probably need to mix and knead the dough lightly with a floured hand, rather than mix it with a spoon.) Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Again, cover, leaving room for the dough to expand, and leave in a warm place for 2-3 hours. By then, the mixture should be quite puffy and expanded with bubbles.
• Pour the oil over the mixture, and sift over the last of the flour, with the sugar and salt. Mix it all together with a hand. (Note: Wholemeal/wholewheat flours tend to soak up more liquid than white flours. If using some or all wholemeal flour for your bread, with this addition of flour you may need to add some more water.) The dough will seem lumpy, but keep mixing and pressing and kneading it together until it is in a lump.
• Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead it until it is smooth and elastic, about 10 mins. Rest it for 5 mins, then knead it again for a few more minutes. It should be very smooth, elastic and even shiny.
• While the dough is resting, grease a bread tin or tray with butter.
• Shape the dough into a cylinder, and press it into the bread tin (or shape it into a loaf and put it on the tray). Slash the top diagonally in a few places, or cut a criss-cross diamond pattern.
• Cover loosely with a plastic bag, or with an upturned plastic or glass container. (This helps to stop the dough forming a crusty skin, and so allows it to rise more easily.)
• Leave to prove (leave to rise). It will probably take a few hours or overnight; rising time depends on temperature. The dough is ready when it is about tripled in size, and filling the bread tin.
• Bake at about 220 C for about 30 mins. The loaf should be golden, and when turned out, it should sound hollow rather than thudding when the bottom is tapped.
• If you like a soft crust, put the hot loaf into a plastic bag to cool. If you like a chewy, crusty crust, leave the loaf out on a rack.
• Slice only once it is cool.

Using a lower oven temperature and cooking for longer will give a thicker and more coloured crust. Creating a steamy environment in the oven, by either spraying the oven with water or putting a roasting tin full of hot water in the bottom, also develops the crust. If the oven has only one element (top or bottom), and the circulation is bad, the top or bottom may brown too quickly. Shield with a piece of foil or doubled thickness of baking paper (you can save and re-use the shield many times before recycling).

SOURDOUGH 'SANDWICH' LOAF

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This recipe was uploaded by cengland

 
 
For a loaf of about 1.2 kg. Bread tin 25cm x 12.5cm x 12.5cm (10in. x 5in. x 5in.).

This makes finer and lighter textured bread than a usual sourdough loaf. It is deliciously though mildly sour, soft and moist. The method, found at Sourdough Baker, is a bit different [1]. A usual process is to make a sponge mixture, leave it for a while, then add all the remaining ingredients. Here, however, flour is added to the sponge in small doses, over time, until a dough is finally formed.

The addition of gluten flour is optional, but it helps the bread along if the flour used is not strong bread-making flour (flour with a protein content of at least 12%, and preferably 15%). Gluten is a mixture of proteins.

The additions of oil and sugar are also optional, but I think they improve the bread.

[1] Warwick Quinton, ‘White Sandwich Sourdough Bread’, at Sourdough Baker: Bake at Home. Retrieved 27 Oct. 2010 from:
http://www.sourdoughbaker.com.au/recipes/white-sandwich-sourdough.html

Method


• Put the water in a large glass or ceramic bowl, and mix in the starter. If necessary, break up the starter and let it soak for a while, then mix it in with a whisk.
• Sift the flour and gluten flour together.
• Sift over 150g of the flour, and mix it in with a wooden spoon. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Cover loosely with a plastic bag, and leave in a warm place for about 1 hour.
• Sift over another 150g flour, and mix it in. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Cover again, and leave in a warm place for 2-3 hours. By then, the mixture should be forming bubbles.
• Sift over another 150g flour, and mix it in. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Again, cover, leaving room for the dough to expand, and leave in a warm place for 2-3 hours.
• Sift over another 150g flour, and mix it in. (Note: Wholemeal/wholewheat flours tend to soak up more liquid than white flours. If using some or all wholemeal flour for your bread, with this addition of flour you will probably need to mix and knead the dough lightly with a floured hand, rather than mix it with a spoon.) Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber scraper. Again, cover, leaving room for the dough to expand, and leave in a warm place for 2-3 hours. By then, the mixture should be quite puffy and expanded with bubbles.
• Pour the oil over the mixture, and sift over the last of the flour, with the sugar and salt. Mix it all together with a hand. (Note: Wholemeal/wholewheat flours tend to soak up more liquid than white flours. If using some or all wholemeal flour for your bread, with this addition of flour you may need to add some more water.) The dough will seem lumpy, but keep mixing and pressing and kneading it together until it is in a lump.
• Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead it until it is smooth and elastic, about 10 mins. Rest it for 5 mins, then knead it again for a few more minutes. It should be very smooth, elastic and even shiny.
• While the dough is resting, grease a bread tin or tray with butter.
• Shape the dough into a cylinder, and press it into the bread tin (or shape it into a loaf and put it on the tray). Slash the top diagonally in a few places, or cut a criss-cross diamond pattern.
• Cover loosely with a plastic bag, or with an upturned plastic or glass container. (This helps to stop the dough forming a crusty skin, and so allows it to rise more easily.)
• Leave to prove (leave to rise). It will probably take a few hours or overnight; rising time depends on temperature. The dough is ready when it is about tripled in size, and filling the bread tin.
• Bake at about 220 C for about 30 mins. The loaf should be golden, and when turned out, it should sound hollow rather than thudding when the bottom is tapped.
• If you like a soft crust, put the hot loaf into a plastic bag to cool. If you like a chewy, crusty crust, leave the loaf out on a rack.
• Slice only once it is cool.

Using a lower oven temperature and cooking for longer will give a thicker and more coloured crust. Creating a steamy environment in the oven, by either spraying the oven with water or putting a roasting tin full of hot water in the bottom, also develops the crust. If the oven has only one element (top or bottom), and the circulation is bad, the top or bottom may brown too quickly. Shield with a piece of foil or doubled thickness of baking paper (you can save and re-use the shield many times before recycling).
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