Small chinese ravioli with fresh herbs and a soy-based dipping sauce

Small chinese ravioli with fresh herbs and a soy-based dipping sauce
 
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by jutta73

 
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Ingredients

Ingredients
Method
 
  • 450g (1 lb) minced (ground) pork
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh marjoram
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped chives
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped spring onions (scallions)
  • 1 tablespoon light soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Shaoxing rice wine
  • 1 packet (package) rice sheets for Chinese ravioli
1. In a mixing bowl, mix the minced pork with the herbs, spring onions, soy sauce and rice wine.
2. Place 1 small tablespoonful of the filling in the centre of each square of pastry, gather up the corners and pinch them firmly together. Continue until all the filling is used up.
3. Place a wire grid or bamboo basket in a wok, or use a steamer. Pour 5cm (2 inches) water into the receptacle and bring it to the boil. Lay the ravioli on a heatproof plate, place this on the grid or in the upper part of the steamer, cover and cook for 20-25 minutes.

My notes on this recipe:

Ken Hom suggests serving this with his tomato-ginger sauce, but I found that too time consuming and complicated. I served the ravioli with a soy based sauce. I mixed 1 cup of soy sauce with finely diced chilli, garlic, ginger, along with a bit of soft brown sugar and squeeze of lemon juice. It is important to taste the sauce and adjust the amount of these ingredients to your own palate.

I decided to halve the recipe as I thought 60 ravioli was a lot! But we could have easily eaten them, as they are small and very tasty!

Use the best pork mince you can afford.

I used 'Wonton wrappers for Chinese ravioli'. I purchased these and the Shaoxing rice wine in a Chinese grocery store, as I could not find these ingredients in the supermarket. The rice wine in the supermarket was almost clear in colour, whereas the Shaoxing rice wine is a richer, darker colour.

Allow time for your wonton wrappers to defrost enough to allow you to manipulate them.

Do not boil dry the water base of your steamer. Something I did by accident. It is a long, slow steaming process so worth checking your water level regularly.

I have to say though these beautiful Chinese style ravioli were quite easy to make and well worth the effort. My hubby and I were very impressed with the ravioli and my own soy sauce style sauce.

Small chinese ravioli with fresh herbs and a soy-based dipping sauce

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This recipe was uploaded by jutta73

 
 
Recipe from Wok & Co by Ken Hom

Makes about 60 ravioli.
Preparation time 30 minutes.
Cooking 20-25 minutes

Method


1. In a mixing bowl, mix the minced pork with the herbs, spring onions, soy sauce and rice wine.
2. Place 1 small tablespoonful of the filling in the centre of each square of pastry, gather up the corners and pinch them firmly together. Continue until all the filling is used up.
3. Place a wire grid or bamboo basket in a wok, or use a steamer. Pour 5cm (2 inches) water into the receptacle and bring it to the boil. Lay the ravioli on a heatproof plate, place this on the grid or in the upper part of the steamer, cover and cook for 20-25 minutes.

My notes on this recipe:

Ken Hom suggests serving this with his tomato-ginger sauce, but I found that too time consuming and complicated. I served the ravioli with a soy based sauce. I mixed 1 cup of soy sauce with finely diced chilli, garlic, ginger, along with a bit of soft brown sugar and squeeze of lemon juice. It is important to taste the sauce and adjust the amount of these ingredients to your own palate.

I decided to halve the recipe as I thought 60 ravioli was a lot! But we could have easily eaten them, as they are small and very tasty!

Use the best pork mince you can afford.

I used 'Wonton wrappers for Chinese ravioli'. I purchased these and the Shaoxing rice wine in a Chinese grocery store, as I could not find these ingredients in the supermarket. The rice wine in the supermarket was almost clear in colour, whereas the Shaoxing rice wine is a richer, darker colour.

Allow time for your wonton wrappers to defrost enough to allow you to manipulate them.

Do not boil dry the water base of your steamer. Something I did by accident. It is a long, slow steaming process so worth checking your water level regularly.

I have to say though these beautiful Chinese style ravioli were quite easy to make and well worth the effort. My hubby and I were very impressed with the ravioli and my own soy sauce style sauce.
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