Jamie's Christmas suckling pig

suckling pig

Serves 10

  • 1 higher-welfare suckling pig, approximately 7kg (or a neck end, approximately 4.5kg)

  • 1 old-English Christmas rub recipe

  • 1 clementine

  • 3 red onions, peeled and quartered

  • a few stalks celery, trimmed and chopped into chunks

  • 3 carrots, scrubbed and chopped into chunks

  • 340 g good-quality marmalade

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 2 tablespoons plain flour

  • 200 ml port or red wine

  • 1 litre water or organic chicken stock

It's best to do all of the prep the night before if you have the chance. Start by scoring the pig or neck end. Set a Stanley knife so the blade is only a centimetre deep and score your pig all over about 2cm apart from each other. Be careful not to score so deep that you cut into the meat; you only want to score the fat. If you find this part a bit daunting you can always ask your butcher to do it for you, but I'd recommend having a go as it's really quite easy.



Next, rub the scored pig all over with the Christmas rub and leave in the fridge overnight. This will give you wonderfully flavoured meat and brilliant crispy crackling.



Preheat the oven to its hottest setting and, if using a whole pig, pop a clementine into its mouth and cover the ears and tail with a double layer of foil to protect these more delicate areas. Place your pig or neck end on a roasting tray in your screaming-hot oven, then turn it down to 180°C/350°F/gas 4 and cook for about 4½ hours. With 1½ hours to go, add your chopped veg to the tray and pop it back into the oven.



For the last 10 minutes of cooking, glaze the pig or neck end with the marmalade, spooning it over generously to make sure you cover over the whole pig. Sprinkle it well with black pepper and put back into the oven to finish. Once done, allow to cool a little, then carefully transfer to a board, cover loosely with tin foil and leave to rest while you get on with your gravy.



To make the gravy, tip your roasting tray at an angle and spoon off most of the fat. Place the tray over a medium heat and add a couple of spoonfuls of flour. Stir it around, scraping all that goodness from the bottom of the tray. Cook it out for a minute or two, then use a potato masher to mash up all the veg. Next, add the port or red wine and about 500ml of the stock. Simmer until you have a consistency you like, then sieve the gravy, again making sure you push that lovely flavour right through the sieve. Remember, you can always loosen it with a little extra stock if you wish.



Shred the pork meat on to a beautiful large platter with plenty of good-sized chunks of crackling for everyone to tuck into. It will be absolutely delicious served with the hot gravy and whole roasted apples.

Nutritional Information

Jamie's Christmas suckling pig

With a sticky glaze and loads of crispy crackling

0 foodies cooked this
A suckling pig is a real showstopper and no more expensive than turkey, so give it a go this year
Serves 10
5h (plus marinating )
Super easy
Method

I think a suckling pig is a real show-stopper and you might be surprised to hear that a good suckling pig is no more expensive than a good turkey. If you're going to give it a bash, just make sure you measure your oven and your largest baking tray before ordering your meat. If your oven is too small for a whole suckling pig, ask your butcher to order you a neck end. It can be cooked in exactly the same way as this recipe here. Free-range or organic suckling pigs can be hard to track down, but do have a go.

It's best to do all of the prep the night before if you have the chance. Start by scoring the pig or neck end. Set a Stanley knife so the blade is only a centimetre deep and score your pig all over about 2cm apart from each other. Be careful not to score so deep that you cut into the meat; you only want to score the fat. If you find this part a bit daunting you can always ask your butcher to do it for you, but I'd recommend having a go as it's really quite easy.

Next, rub the scored pig all over with the Christmas rub and leave in the fridge overnight. This will give you wonderfully flavoured meat and brilliant crispy crackling.

Preheat the oven to its hottest setting and, if using a whole pig, pop a clementine into its mouth and cover the ears and tail with a double layer of foil to protect these more delicate areas. Place your pig or neck end on a roasting tray in your screaming-hot oven, then turn it down to 180°C/350°F/gas 4 and cook for about 4½ hours. With 1½ hours to go, add your chopped veg to the tray and pop it back into the oven.

For the last 10 minutes of cooking, glaze the pig or neck end with the marmalade, spooning it over generously to make sure you cover over the whole pig. Sprinkle it well with black pepper and put back into the oven to finish. Once done, allow to cool a little, then carefully transfer to a board, cover loosely with tin foil and leave to rest while you get on with your gravy.

To make the gravy, tip your roasting tray at an angle and spoon off most of the fat. Place the tray over a medium heat and add a couple of spoonfuls of flour. Stir it around, scraping all that goodness from the bottom of the tray. Cook it out for a minute or two, then use a potato masher to mash up all the veg. Next, add the port or red wine and about 500ml of the stock. Simmer until you have a consistency you like, then sieve the gravy, again making sure you push that lovely flavour right through the sieve. Remember, you can always loosen it with a little extra stock if you wish.

Shred the pork meat on to a beautiful large platter with plenty of good-sized chunks of crackling for everyone to tuck into. It will be absolutely delicious served with the hot gravy and whole roasted apples.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:

Calories

Calories are just a unit of energy. If you eat more than you use you can gain weight, or lose it if you don't eat enough. How much you need depends on your weight, gender and how active you are, but it's around 2,000 a day.

Carbs

Carbs are a great source of energy and, excluding foods such as potatoes, are made from grains - like bread, pasta and cereal. We all need carbs, but try to make them all wholegrain by sticking to brown bread, rice and pasta - they are much more nutritious.

Sugar

We all deserve a treat sometimes, but try to limit your sugar intake. Most of your sugar should come from raw fruit and milk, because they give us lots of nutrients too. Always check food labels so you know how much sugar you're eating.

Fat

We all need to eat a small amount of fat because it protects our organs and helps us grow. But we need to be careful about how much fat we eat and what kinds of fat, because in higher levels it's associated with weight gain, diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

Saturates

Saturated or "bad fats" are in beef, pork, chicken skin, butter, cream and cheese. Too much can be bad for our heart and cholesterol levels, but unsaturated or "good fats" in fish, nuts, avocados and some oils can help keep our hearts healthy if eaten in moderation.

Protein

Protein helps our muscles to grow and repair, as well as providing you with essential amino acids. When it comes to protein, try to eat leaner sources such as chicken and fish or non-meat sources such as eggs, dairy, beans, nuts, seeds, tofu and pulses.
  • Calories 1214
    61%
  • Carbs 8.5g
    3%
  • Sugar 29.9g 33%
  • Fat 92.4g 132%
  • Saturates 44.7g 223%
  • Protein 55.0g 122%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

Close

Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

Show/hide comments

comments powered by Disqus

  • 1 higher-welfare suckling pig, approximately 7kg (or a neck end, approximately 4.5kg)

  • 1 old-English Christmas rub recipe

  • 1 clementine

  • 3 red onions, peeled and quartered

  • a few stalks celery, trimmed and chopped into chunks

  • 3 carrots, scrubbed and chopped into chunks

  • 340 g good-quality marmalade

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 2 tablespoons plain flour

  • 200 ml port or red wine

  • 1 litre water or organic chicken stock