Veggie korma, Mock cauliflower pilau

Serves 4

  • 1 heaped teaspoon flaked almonds

  • 2 large sweet potatoes

  • olive oil

  • 1 red onion

  • 2 cloves of garlic

  • 1 thumb-sized piece of ginger

  • 1/2 a bunch of fresh coriander (15g)

  • 1/2-1 fresh red chilli, (optional)

  • 1 handful of curry leaves

  • 1 heaped tablespoon korma curry paste

  • 1 x 400 g tin of chickpeas

  • 1 large cauliflower

  • 1/2-1 lemon

  • 50 g feta cheese, (optional)

  • 4 tablespoons fat-free natural yoghurt

Start by toasting the almonds in a large casserole pan until lightly golden, then tip out and set aside. Scrub the sweet potatoes clean, then cut into 4cm chunks and put them into the pan on a medium heat with a lug of oil. Fry for about 5 minutes, or until golden, while you peel the onion, garlic and ginger, then finely slice them with the coriander stalks and chilli (if using – it will give the sauce a real kick). Add the curry leaves to the pan and stir for 1 minute, then add all the sliced veg with the curry paste and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until the onions have softened, stirring occasionally. Add the chickpeas (juice and all) with 600ml of boiling water, then bring everything to the boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for around 30 minutes, or until thickened.



Meanwhile, click off and chop the cauliflower leaves, then finely slice the stalk and add both to the curry for the rest of the cooking time. Cut the florets into even-sized chunks and pulse in a food processor until it's the same texture and size as rice. Tip it into a microwave-safe dish and cover. Steam or microwave the cauliflower on high for 7 minutes, or until cooked through, just before serving.



Add a good squeeze of lemon juice to the curry, then season to perfection and crumble over the feta (if using – I think of it here as a nod towards Indian paneer, and it adds a lovely subtle bit of extra flavour). Dollop over the yoghurt and stir it through for that korma creaminess (or serve on the side, if you prefer), then sprinkle with coriander leaves and the toasted almonds. Tip the cauliflower on to a nice serving platter, and dig in.

Nutritional Information

Method

I always get very excited when I can create massive, delicious flavours in curries without using any meat, and as well as being good for you, it's good for your wallet too. To mix things up a bit, instead of using rice I've cooked cauliflower in such a way here that it looks, feels and acts like rice – it's really delicious. Have a go at this tasty recipe and I promise, even your most carnivorous all-man geezer mates will be happy.

Start by toasting the almonds in a large casserole pan until lightly golden, then tip out and set aside. Scrub the sweet potatoes clean, then cut into 4cm chunks and put them into the pan on a medium heat with a lug of oil. Fry for about 5 minutes, or until golden, while you peel the onion, garlic and ginger, then finely slice them with the coriander stalks and chilli (if using – it will give the sauce a real kick). Add the curry leaves to the pan and stir for 1 minute, then add all the sliced veg with the curry paste and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until the onions have softened, stirring occasionally. Add the chickpeas (juice and all) with 600ml of boiling water, then bring everything to the boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for around 30 minutes, or until thickened.

Meanwhile, click off and chop the cauliflower leaves, then finely slice the stalk and add both to the curry for the rest of the cooking time. Cut the florets into even-sized chunks and pulse in a food processor until it's the same texture and size as rice. Tip it into a microwave-safe dish and cover. Steam or microwave the cauliflower on high for 7 minutes, or until cooked through, just before serving.

Add a good squeeze of lemon juice to the curry, then season to perfection and crumble over the feta (if using – I think of it here as a nod towards Indian paneer, and it adds a lovely subtle bit of extra flavour). Dollop over the yoghurt and stir it through for that korma creaminess (or serve on the side, if you prefer), then sprinkle with coriander leaves and the toasted almonds. Tip the cauliflower on to a nice serving platter, and dig in.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Tip

I've used shop-bought paste here, but to save even more pennies, why not try making your own.
Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 334 17%
  • Carbs 48.7g 21%
  • Sugar 13.6g 15%
  • Fat 7.9g 11%
  • Saturates 1.1g 6%
  • Protein 13.6g 30%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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