Jamie Oliver var noskimwords = 'true'; var _comscore = _comscore || []; _comscore.push({ c1: "2", c2: "17817337" }); (function() { var s = document.createElement("script"), el = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.async = true; s.src = (document.location.protocol == "https:" ? "https://sb" : "http://b") + ".scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js"; el.parentNode.insertBefore(s, el); })();

Caramelised Onion, Rosemary & Gruyère Fougasse

 
JUN 20 @ 04:38

by michael_toa

This is another incredibly easy bread to make... and it's so delicious, I feel the only right thing to do is to share it with all of you.

When making fougasse, I can't help but think about it's Italian cousin, focaccia; because they're made with pretty much the same dough.  But not wanting to offend anyone, they're obviously not the same, and not just in terms of appearance, but also in texture.  Focaccia is often more bread-like and fougasse is thinner and because of that, you get more crispy edges which I love.  But please don't make me choose which one I prefer more...

This fougasse is already packed with flavours and it is lovely just by itself, but if you just happen to have some olive tapenade... well, need I say more?

Caramelised Onion, Rosemary, Chilli and Gruyère Fougasse
Recipe adapted from BBC Good Food
Makes 2 Fougasse

500 grams strong white bread flour
10 grams salt
7 grams dried yeast
5 grams caster sugar
30 ml olive oil
300 ml water

2 medium sized onion, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons dried rosemary
1 teaspoons dried chilli flakes, plus more
100 grams gruyère cheese, cut into cubes
a pinch of sugar
butter
olive oil

In the bowl of your free standing mixer, add the flour, salt, dried yeast, sugar, olive oil and water.  Using a wooden spoon, give it a mix until well combined.  Then using a dough hook, let the machine do all the work for five minutes.  When the dough is smooth, shape it into a ball, cover with tea towel and let it rest for an hour.

In the meantime, make the caramelised onion.  Thinly slice the onions and cook in a little bit of olive oil and butter.  I want the flavour from the butter, but because I don't want it to burn, I add the olive oil.  Season the onions with salt and freshly ground black pepper.  To encourage the caramelisation, I add a pinch (a teaspoon perhaps) of sugar.  Cook this gently for 10-15 minutes and then let it cool to one side.

When the dough has doubled in size, knead in the caramelised onion, rosemary and chilli flakes on a lightly floured surface.  Then using a sharp knife, cut the dough in half.

Using a rolling pin, roll the dough to a rough oval shape.  You need to be quite firm with the dough.  Then cut slashes in the loaf to resemble a fern leaf.  Then using your fingers, really open these slashes because they might close during the second rise.  Repeat the process to the other dough.

Transfer the loaves on to a baking tray and cover again with a tea towel.   Leave them to rise for about 20 minutes.  Preheat your oven to 200 C.

Once risen, sprinkle over the Gruyère cheese and some more chilli flakes.  Bake for 15-20 minutes until the crusts are golden.  Best served warm.

For more recipe ideas, please visit my other blog Me, My Food and I at www.michaeltoa.blogspot.com

0 replies

Login or register to make a comment

Pages: 1
var signup = { alphapopper: '#popup1', thanks_gift_image: 'gift-card-wine-us.png', ignore_cookie: false, is_logged_in: false, is_carl:false, is_allowed: true, is_dormant: false }