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#1 Sat 20 Oct 07 12:44pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Offals - ISO recipes

Hi,

In another thread offals were mentioned as an inexpensive yet wholesome food, and I have to admit, I have never cooked them. I have used the ones that come with a chicken or turkey or rabbit for the gravy but nothing else.
I did not care much for liver and kidneys in my childhood and have not tried since. And I think I might have to give it another try.

But I did have some fantastic haggis in Scotland last year and I do like all kinds of sausages with offals (Leberwurst (liver sausage), Blutwurst (blood sausage - on a sandwich or fried), tongue (whole or bits of it in a blood sausage), Schwarzwurst (a black blood sausage) etc. - lots of regional German specialties).

So my question is:
Do you have any recipes to share? Haggis maybe or black pudding? Or whatever your favorites may be, as I really have no experience!

And the second question:
How do I get my OH to try the stuff? It's not easy to get him try something new (although he has improved as I leave him not much choice), and I think offals might be asking a little too much. Especially when it does not look pretty. hmm

Last edited by SusanneH (Sat 20 Oct 07 10:25pm)

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#2 Sat 20 Oct 07 1:37pm

Hadleigh

Member
Occupation family support practitioner
From suffolk
Member since Wed 17 Oct 07

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Have a recipie from Mother in law (oh thats another thread i feel!). Got taught this one when first lived in Sicily. It's very rustic, but great comfort food for this time of year. Sorry if i,m a bit vague with amounts, here goes anyway:
Slice and gently fry an onion in olive oil, and then add some quickly par-boiled cubed potatoes, and about 500gr of fresh chicken livers, let the chicken mixture cook for about 5 mins and then season and add herb of choice (i use oregano)and add 500gr of good passata, double the amount with water and let to simmer for about 30 mins.
You will either love or hate this. Served with crusty bread and a large glass of red, enjoy. yummy

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#3 Sat 20 Oct 07 2:24pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Thank you Hadleigh!

Our mothers' and grandmothers' recipes (own or in-law alike) tend to be like that. (a hand full of of that, some of this, a little something else....) Still they are often the best ones. I love recipes that are a bit rustic and traditional, no fuss and pure. This sounds like such a one!

I think I would never have cooked potatoes and tomatoes together in one dish, but it sounds  yummy

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#4 Mon 22 Oct 07 11:10pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Thought this would not be everyone's favorite topic, but....

Anyone else?

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#5 Tue 23 Oct 07 5:04am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

I cook with offal regularly - at least once a week.

To be honest, I wouldn't try making your own haggis or black pudding - its certainly possible, but unless you have an exceptional supplier, you won't be able get the ingredients to make either properly. I do have recipes for both - but you would need to be extremely committed and enthusiastic to make either.

Liver is a really easy way to start. Generally, you can get 5 different livers.

Chicken Liver - Small, tender and very quick to cook.
Lambs Liver - tender and quick cooking
Calves Liver - tender, quick cooking an great flavour
Pigs Liver - slower cooking, good flavour
Ox Liver - slow to cook, strongest flavour.

If you can afford it, there are acouple of others:-

Goose liver - Foie Gras - the "creme de la creme"
Duck liver - second only to goose.

It's sometimes possible to get game liver, such as venison, rabbit or hare, or wild boar - or even bison, moose or elk - if you can get it - go for it - game liver has great flaviur and texture. The liver was always the "hunter's portion" - reserved for the one's who made the kill.

The secret to cooking liver is - don't over cook it. Liver should be "quickly seared / slowly poached". If its grey, tough or grainy - its ruined, and fit for neither man nor beast.

There are three classical ways to serve liver:-

Pate - (which just means paste). Liver is either briefly fried or poached (in water or in oil), then pounded wih other ingredients, and then poached in the oven in a water bath. This can also include traditional variaions, like savoury duck or faggots.

Fried - slices of liver briefly seared with caramelized onions, the served with a pan gravy. Bacon is often added to the onions before the liver is seared.

Braised - the liver is sliced, coated with flour and fried briefly, then poached gently in a slow cooker or casserole, along with caramelized onions and other veg.. Often served as a hotpot, topped with sliced potatoes.

Rather than giving specific recipes - do a google search.

Liver Pate - http://www.google.com/search?q=Liver+Pa … GB175GB175

Fried Liver - http://www.google.com/search?q=Fried+Li … GB175GB175

Braised Liver - http://www.google.com/search?q=Braised+ … GB175GB175

OK - enough for now - I'll tackle kidneys tomorrow!

Last edited by GeoffP (Tue 23 Oct 07 5:05am)

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#6 Tue 23 Oct 07 9:17am

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Geoff, what would we do without you? Thanks much!

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#7 Wed 24 Oct 07 8:22am

VENUS

Forum champ
From Sydney, Australia
Member since Tue 22 Jun 04

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Quick Haggis

        1/2 lb liver
        1 onion
        1/2 cup oatmeal
        5 to 8 cups stock
        1/2 cup suet
        1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
        1/2 tsp. salt
Boil the liver and parboil the onion, then mince them together. Lightly brown the oatmeal then mix all ingredients together. Place in a greased basin and cover with foil, or a suet crust if desired and steam for 1 1/2 hours

Black Pudding
1lt (1¾ pints) Blood (Pig, Lamb or Goose)
340g (12oz) Shredded Suet
300ml (½ pint) Milk
50g (2oz) Oatmeal
3 Medium Onions, chopped
1 tbsp Salt
½ tsp Mixed Herbs
½ tsp Cayenne Pepper
Pinch Nutmeg

Pre-heat oven to 160°C: 300°F: Gas 2.
Mix all of the ingredients together thoroughly, making sure that the seasonings are evenly distributed.
Next fill the large sausage cases
Place into an ovenproof dish with a cover, standing in a larger dish half filled with water.
Bake for 1½ hours.
Allow to cool.

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#8 Thu 25 Oct 07 1:07am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Kidneys.

My favourite Christmas breakfast is lamb's kidney, bacon and mushrooms, fried and served on thick toast. Delicious smile

People are often put off kidneys by the thought if what they are for, or the slightly "pissy" flavour.

The first important thing when cooking kidneys is to cut out the core, the white tubes and sinewy bits - the easiest way to do this is with a pair of sharp scissors. You should also remove the skins if this has nit already been done. Then, it's a good idea to drop the kidneys into a bowl of acidulated water (use either vinegar ir lemon juice). This neutralizes the ammoniacal pissy flavour.

Lamb's kidneys are easiest to get hold of, though sometimes you can get pig's kidneys, and ox kidney's. Game kidneys are much rarer, though sometimes available. Kidneys from chicken and other fowl are not generally used (birds have a different physiology).

Kidneys are the basis for a variety of classic dishes Rignons turbigo, Steak snd kidney pie/pudding, devilled kidneys, etc..

There is a good range of such recipes at:-

http://www.cookitsimply.com/category-0020-01f41.html

Perhaps thebest way to introduce someone to kidneys for the first time is to do steak & kidney pie.

Steak and kidney pie     
Serves 6

Preparation time 1-2 hours
Cooking time 1 to 2 hours
   
A traditional English dish that takes some preparation time, but is delicious in the end.

Ingredients
225g/8oz lamb's kidneys
700g/1lb 9oz chuck steak
1 tbsp vegetable oil
knob of butter
2 onions, chopped roughly
2 tbsp plain flour
2 bay leaves
4 sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves only
570ml/1 pint beef stock
4 field mushrooms, sliced thickly
1 tsp tomato purée
1 tsp mushroom seasoning or mushroom ketchup (if not available, use Worcestershire sauce)
3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
salt and feshly ground black pepper
For the pastry:
175g/6oz butter
225g/8oz plain flour
8-9 tbsp water
1 beaten egg, to glaze

Method
1. Halve the kidneys and cut out the tubes. Rinse in cold water and peel off the skins. Cut in small pieces. Trim and cut the steak in cubes.
2. Heat oil and butter in a large pan, then fry the onions for 3-4 minutes, stirring. Fry the meat for 2-3 minutes until it loses its pink colour. Stir in the flour and cook for 2 minutes. Add the herbs and stock. Stir until thickened and coming to the boil.
3. Add mushrooms and purée, lower the heat and simmer, covered, for about 1½ hours until, the meat is tender.
4.Make the pastry: wrap the butter in foil and freeze for 45 minutes. Mix the flour with ¼ tsp of salt.
5. Holding the frozen butter in foil, dip it in the flour and grate coarsely back into the bowl, peel the foil back so it does not get grated. Keep dipping it in the flour as you grate.
6. Mix in the butter with a knife until evenly coated with flour. Stir in the water to form a dough. Gently form into a ball. Wrap in plastic film and chill for 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
7. When the meat is cooked, remove bay leaves, season with salt, pepper and mushroom seasoning (or Worcestershire sauce), then cool slightly.
8. Roll out the pastry on a floured surface to 5mm/¼in thick and 2.5cm/1in wider than a 1.2 Litre/2 pint pie dish. Cut out the lid so it is slightly bigger than the dish. Cut a strip of pastry the width of the rim. Stir the parsley in to the meat and transfer to the dish.
9. Brush the rim with egg, lay pastry strip on top and seal. Brush with egg and put lid on top. Seal the edges, knock them up with the back of a knife. Flute the edge. Cut a slit in the lid, brush with the egg (but not the edges or they won't rise).
10. Bake for 20 minutes, then brush with egg again. Bake for 10 minutes until the pastry is golden.

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#9 Thu 25 Oct 07 10:12am

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Here pigs kidneys are the most common. Lamb is not very common I think...

Thanks again wink

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#10 Thu 25 Oct 07 6:04pm

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Offals - ISO recipes

Pigs kidneys are fine for steak & kidney pie/pudding - as are ox kidneys.

For dishes which use kidneys as the main ingredient, lambs kidneys are more tender. Veal kidneys - if you can get them, are reallygood too.

Rognons Turbigo

Saute of Kidneys
ingredients
8 sheep's kidneys
2 tablespoons oil
1 cup Espagnole Sauce (see below)
salt and pepper
125 g (4 oz) button mushrooms
2 tablespoons butter
4 thin sausages or 8 chipolatas
chopped parsley for garnish
toast triangles for serving

method

Cooking time: 20 minutes

8 sheep's kidneys
2 tablespoons oil
1 cup Espagnole Sauce (see below)
salt and pepper
125 g (4 oz) button mushrooms
2 tablespoons butter
4 thin sausages or 8 chipolatas
chopped parsley for garnish
toast triangles for serving

1. Remove skin from kidneys, cut in half and remove fatty cores.

2. Saute in oil in a frying pan for 4 to 5 minutes. Do not overcook.

3. Drain well and place in small saucepan with espagnole sauce. Leave on low heat to heat through gently.

4. Sauté mushrooms in butter.

5. Fry sausages in oil left from kidneys, cut in half if long.

6. Place kidneys and sauce in a serving dish, arrange mushrooms and sausages on top, sprinkle with chopped parsley and place toast triangles around sides of dish.

7. Serve immediately.

Espagnole Sauce

Cooking time: 1 1/4 hours Yield: 2 cups

60 g (2 oz) butter
2 bacon rashers, chopped
1 carrot, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 onion, sliced
4 tablespoons plain flour
3 cups Beef Stock
4 mushrooms, sliced
2 tablespoons tomato paste bouquet garni
salt and pepper
2-3 tablespoons sherry

1. Heat butter in a heavy saucepan, add bacon, carrot, celery and onion and cook gently until vegetables are golden brown—they must not burn.

2. Add flour and stir well.

3. Cook over gentle heat until the roux is a deep golden brown (12 to 15 minutes). Do not allow to burn.

4. Add stock and bring to boil, stirring continuously.

5. Add mushrooms, tomato paste, bouquet garni, salt and pepper and simmer gently, uncovered, for at least 1 hour, stirring fequently and skimming if necessary.

6. Strain through a fine pointed strainer.

7. Add sherry, taste and adjust flavour if necessary before serving.

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