forum: Food & Drink

Subscribe to forums RSS

#1 Sun 17 Feb 08 4:03pm

Captain C

Forum champ
Occupation Sales
From Essex
Member since Tue 05 Feb 08

Pizza stone's

Has anybogy got one of these, how good are they, and where did you get it ?
I am starting to get into making my own pizzas and need to get the base nice and crispy, so any of you experinced pizza makers out there may be able to help me.  crossed

    Likes (0)

#2 Sun 17 Feb 08 4:15pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Pizza stone's

I followed Jamie's advice from Jamie's Italy and got a granite floor tile. He says it should be at least 2cm thick I think (mine is a little thinner and also works) and it must be granite (there are natural stones that will crack when in the oven and apparently can do horrible damage).

Just preheat your oven on the highest setting (250°C on mine) with the stone on the bottom rack. Put your pizza on the preheated stone (use polenta or semolina on the stone so that it won't stick) and bake for about 7 minutes. The pizza gets a great crunchy bottom (and not soggy as it did before I had the stone)

The stone is also very good for baking bread on it big_smile

    Likes (0)

#3 Sun 17 Feb 08 4:25pm

Tanya

Forum champ
From Scotland
Member since Thu 15 Jul 04

Re: Pizza stone's

Hi Captain C....

Did you see "Jamie at Home" last week, where he made Pizza.  He cooked some in his outdoor wood oven and also in an electric oven in his kitchen.

In his kitchen oven he used a large thick piece of granite which I think sat in a roasting tray and he used this like a pizza stone to bake the pizzas.  He made a regular pizza and a calzone.....they looked delicious.  The regular pizza had a very thin, crispy base.

This is a quote from the Pizza chapter in "Jamie at Home".

"I decided to include this chapter in the book because I had a wood oven built in ,y garden last year, and I've been cooking some delicious pizzas in it.  As these ovens reach very high cooking temperatures, they're perfect for cooking bread and flatbreads like pizza.  'But I don't own a wood oven'.  It doesn't matter, though, because once I was happy that I had mastered the perfect pizza in the wood oven, I worked on the recipes in this chapter so that they give almost the same impressive results when cooked in my normal oven...here's the trick...buy yourself a pizza stone from a good cook shop or a thick piece of marble or granite from your local builders' merchant or stonemason.  The great thing about these slabs is that you can measure up your oven and have a piece cut to size.  Just preheat the pizza stone or slab in a very hot oven and your pizza bases will turn out really well  when cooked on them - almost giving you wood oven results.  You can also cook whole fish, T-boned steaks and lamb chops on a pizza stone or slab.  Treat yourself to one - you won't regret it."


yummy  thumbsup

    Likes (0)

#4 Sun 17 Feb 08 4:56pm

Khaines

Member
Occupation Pigging out...
From Bournemouth UK
Member since Fri 08 Feb 08

Re: Pizza stone's

Steamer Trading Company do pizza stones - I was looking at some earlier, they're £9.99.

    Likes (0)

#5 Sun 17 Feb 08 6:10pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Pizza stone's

I found this ebay shop that sells pizza stones the other day when I was looking around on ebay.They look reasonable to me but seem a little expensive.

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/3-2-1-p-i-z-z-a-eu-shop

Pizza stones do make a difference to the base of the pizza and also to the speed that a pizza cooks.

I have a round pizza stone that I bought from the proffesional cookware company , it has served me well !!

http://www.cookware.co.uk/search.html?s … izza+stone

I would like a large piece of granite but i know that I would have trouble lifting it onto the oven shelf , so that will have to wait.

Unlike Susanne I do not put anything onto the pizza stone.
I have a short handled pizza peel that I sprinke with corn meal /pollenta /semolina and then once I have rolled the dough I pop it onto the pizza peel, top the pizza quickly ,with what ever toppings that I fancy and then slide it off the peel strait onto the pre-heated pizza stone in the oven.

I have also used a pizza stone when making nan breads , tandorri chicken and a few other things like that ,( but for the tandorri chicken I have seperate  pizza stone that I have had for quite some time as I do not want to tranfer the flavours .)
Pizza stones are also good for baking fish on.

I think that they are worth buying, but like all kitchen equiptment...buy the best you can afford. thumbsup

    Likes (0)

#6 Sun 17 Feb 08 6:27pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Pizza stone's

Always thought I had to put something on it as not make things stick. Good to know that I don't have to. Might not do it next time then wink Thanks Mummza!

A standard sized square of granite fit my oven rack perfectly and cost only 1.50€ or thereabouts wink

Last edited by SusanneH (Sun 17 Feb 08 6:27pm)

    Likes (0)

#7 Sun 17 Feb 08 7:29pm

French_vanilla

Forum champ
Occupation Secretary
From Dublin - Ireland
Member since Sun 01 Apr 07

Re: Pizza stone's

In France, we use the stone the same way (pre-heat in the oven etc.) but we dont use it for pizza. We use it for meat... Now, that was the very popular way in the late 80's as far as I can remember.... We called it: a Pierrade.... I think it was more like a posh version of your typical barbecue.....  cool

Basically, you would have thin slices of your favourite meat in different platters (chicken, beef, pork, lamb etc.), as well as veggies like peppers, mushrooms etc. and loads of different sauces to go with that....

You would pre-heat the stone in the oven, then bring it to the table and keep it warm with some kind of fondue set... and everybody cooks what they want on the stone... But it's gone out of fashion as I dont recall anybody I know making a "pierrade" in ages...

Frenchie

    Likes (0)

#8 Sun 17 Feb 08 8:30pm

Beautiful BC

Forum champ
From British Columbia, Canada
Member since Wed 04 May 05

Re: Pizza stone's

That's really interesting Frenchie....I'd never heard of pierrade before.

    Likes (0)

#9 Sun 17 Feb 08 8:58pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Pizza stone's

Here it was a big fad in early nineties to have a stone like that on top of a raclette that most people started having then.
Some people also had the kind that you put in the oven like Frenchie described I think, but it was less common (the posh version). 
They only called it "heißer Stein" (hot stone).

    Likes (0)

#10 Mon 18 Feb 08 2:25am

Cindy

Forum champ
Occupation Registered Nurse
From Adelaide, OZ
Member since Tue 03 Aug 04

Re: Pizza stone's

Don't buy the expensive  pizza stone. Just get an l cheapo one. I paid about $10 for mine and  I use it all the time. Its lasted me about 5 years with no issues.

    Likes (0)

Powered by PunBB