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#1 Sun 02 Nov 08 8:20pm

bop42

Member
Member since Sun 02 Nov 08

Mushy Peas

Cheers All

I own a British Restaurant in Arizona and have had multiple requests for mushy peas.  To my dismay I have no idea how to make "real" mushy peas.

I am open to any and all suggestions.

Thanks

Gregg

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#2 Sun 02 Nov 08 8:56pm

SusanneH

Forum champ
From Germany
Member since Mon 13 Mar 06

Re: Mushy Peas

Just cook them longer?
Sorry, no idea, but doesn't sound very desirable wink

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#3 Sun 02 Nov 08 9:18pm

Anna

Forum champ
From Switzerland
Member since Fri 15 Apr 05

Re: Mushy Peas

Mushy peas are made with marrowfat peas, not garden peas.  You soak them for 12h in boiled water with some bicarbonate of soda, then cook with butter, salt and sugar until mushy.  You can add mint, if you like, but I prefer without.

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#4 Sun 02 Nov 08 9:38pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Mushy Peas

They are made from soaked , dried Marrow-fat peas.
I haven't made them for years but I seem to remember that they had to cook , simply in salted water for quite a while.

Mushy Peas... great with fish and chips !!!

When I was young , I had a long bus ride home from school and if I walked part way home I would be able to buy some Mushy Peas with the money I saved .
The chippy used to put them into a tall waxed paper pot   I would the hot mushy peas with pepper and a splosh of vinegar on the top  whilst I walked the cold walk to the next bus stop.

Putting vinegar and pepper on the Mushy Peas  was quite a 'Midland' thing to do as far as I know.

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#5 Sun 02 Nov 08 9:40pm

mummza

Forum super champ
Occupation avoiding housework
From The land of song.
Member since Tue 04 Oct 05

Re: Mushy Peas

oops I nipped off half way through writting the above post to watch Top Gear , (the lorry races !!... very funny...) so I had not seen that Anna had posted inthe meantime  big_smile

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#6 Mon 03 Nov 08 9:24am

minerva

Forum champ
Occupation Walking the Old Ways
From Living in the Wild Woods
Member since Wed 16 Jan 08

Re: Mushy Peas

This is very much an East Midlands thing!

This is how I do them:
To every 8oz dried Marrowfat (& yes, they do have to be Marrowfat!) Peas....
place in a large bowl, add 2 tsps Bicarbonate of Soda & two or three times the volume of water & stir. Cover & leave overnight to soak. The Bicarb ensures that the peas will break down on cooking.
To cook........
Discard any floating peas. Rinse the peas well. Place in a not too big saucepan & only just cover the peas with water. Bring to the boil, cover & reduce the heat to simmer. Cook for 1-1 1/2 hours or until soft (keep checking the water level so the peas don't stick to the pan). Add a little salt to taste (Don't add whilst cooking the peas or they will go tough). When cooked & cold, they will keep covered in the fridge for a little while.
To serve......... in Nottinghamshire the peas are best served with Mint Sauce.

Edit: I don't suppose this is any use to you, but I've stuck it in just for interests sake
www.wherryandsons.com/food_products/marrow.html

Last edited by minerva (Mon 03 Nov 08 9:27am)

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#7 Mon 03 Nov 08 10:46am

GeoffP

Forum champ
Occupation Retired Clergy & Computer Consultant
From Bradford, West Yorks
Member since Mon 03 Jul 06

Re: Mushy Peas

I would guess that the nearest you could get to dried marrowfat peas in America are green split peas - the sort you would use in a green pea soup.

These would not be quite authentic, since the marrowfat peas we use in the UK are whole in their skins. If you could find a supply of "unsplit green split peas", these would probably be ideal.

Mushy Peas should be cooked until naturally mushy - don't be tempted to mash them if they seem to separate - cook for longer.

As mentioned above, mushy peas are usually served with fish and chips, accompanied by mint sauce. We also serve them as "Pie and Peas" - hot English Pork individual hand raised Pies (Melton Mowbray and the like) - again accompanied by mint sauce. Both Fish & Chips and Pie & Peas are traditional British "takeaway" foods. Round this area - West Yorkshire - we are serious about pork pies - butchers compete annual in the annual Pork Pie Appreciation Societies championship. I have been known to travel many miles to get the best smile

Pie & peas is very popular at cheap communal meals, such as Church Suppers, and every Parish I have served in has had at least one "Parish Pea Boiler" - a very large pan, up to 20 or 30 Ltrs in size, wherein generations of Ladies have simmered vast quantities of peas. Another traditional time to serve Pie and Peas in the North of England and the Midlands is "Plot Night" sometimes called "Bonfire Night" or "Guy Fawkes Night" - the 5th November, where Pie & Peas and a baked potato are eaten round the bonfire while watching the firework display. (I'll be serving that for dinner on Wednesday this week, followed by Yorkshire Parkin, Parkin Pigs and Plot Toffee - got to keep the old traditions going ) )

In the UK, we also have another similar dish to mushy peas, and that is "Pease Pudding" - made with yellow split peas. Pease Pudding is smoother than Mushy Peas, as it is mashed or pureed before serving. Pease Pudding is usually served with bacon or ham, and the better versions have a piece of bacon cooked in with them (a bit like Boston Baked Beans)

A recent Southern English perversion of mushy peas is to cook ordinary garden peas, then mash them. Don't go down this road - your customers won't appreciate it.

Hope you succeed in sourcing the right peas - and and that your customers appreciate them - they'll be back for more if you get it right. Just Googled and it seems British Restaurants and British Pubs are quite popular in Arizona - amazing smile

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#8 Mon 03 Nov 08 11:01am

Allora Andiamo

Forum champ
Occupation Double Barrel Sheila
From Sauerkraut Country
Member since Mon 06 Oct 08

Re: Mushy Peas

hi gregg

here's a list of british food suppliers (in the US) that might be of help:
http://www.britsintheus.com/foods.htm

AA

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#9 Mon 03 Nov 08 11:08am

katiemarkham

Member
Occupation Secretary and amateur gardener
From Wigan, Lancashire, UK
Member since Wed 20 Feb 08

Re: Mushy Peas

Mmmm mushy peas are the best thing to have with pie, in my opinion! And I will admit, although I expect to be villified for this... the ones out of a tin are by far the best ones!

It was halloween this weekend, and all my friends were eating black peas, with vinegar. I'm not originally from Wigan, and didn't like the sound of peas with vinegar personally, but apparently it is a firmly-entrenched northern custom to have black peas with vinegar around this time of year. I'm told that on bonfire night, everyone and his dog indulges.

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#10 Mon 03 Nov 08 11:09am

katiemarkham

Member
Occupation Secretary and amateur gardener
From Wigan, Lancashire, UK
Member since Wed 20 Feb 08

Re: Mushy Peas

Oh and Geoff... what are Parkin Pigs? I'm intruiged!

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