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#1 Tue 20 Dec 11 3:32pm

aaronjunited

Member
From N.Ireland, Belfast
Member since Tue 27 Jan 09

Blanching Veg

I've been watching BBC good food and food network channels on sky, picked up a tip for roast parsnip.

I usually have roasted parsnip and carrot with Christmas dinner and they always get over cooked till the point were they are almost burnt, they then have a bad texture to them almost like rubbery and overly soft.

I gathered that blanching the parsnips in hot boiling water for a few minutes then letting them cool helps them keep the moisture when they go in the oven.

Any tips or how to go about this process, how would it take to roast them if i blanched and also can this be done with the carrots?

Thanks again.
Aaron.

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#2 Tue 20 Dec 11 4:01pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Blanching Veg

I love my veg done this way as they keep their savours. Carrots, fenel, parsnips, chard....

Boil a pot of salted water. Prepare the veg and slice them in half length ways. Cooking should remain short - 3 minutes - because the vegetables will finish cooking in the oven.

Then plunge them into ice water and drain. I place them on cooking paper on an oven dish with a few pieces of Thyme and add a little olive oil over each veg.

This doesn't concern frozen vegetables. You only have to thaw them in advance.

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#3 Tue 20 Dec 11 4:10pm

aaronjunited

Member
From N.Ireland, Belfast
Member since Tue 27 Jan 09

Re: Blanching Veg

Ok thanks for that, is there anyway I could do this in advance? Or can i only chop and prepare them then blanch on the day before roasting? How long should i roast them also?

Also instead of making a new thread which Ive done a few times lol.

How should i defrost my turkey, this is the first time cooking a turkey as i don't usually cook one for Christmas, im more chicken and beef.

It's 19kg turkey crown, so how long should i roast it as well?

Last edited by aaronjunited (Tue 20 Dec 11 4:18pm)

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#4 Tue 20 Dec 11 5:22pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Blanching Veg

I can't see any harm in blanching the veg the day before, make sure that once cooled you put them in a closed sachet/tuppaware and keep them in the coolest place in your fridge. For roasting times, make sure that the oven is hot before putting in the veg, i just check with a knife after about 20 mins, as i like them still crisp and not soft.

I found a chart on the net for veg cooking times: http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/tools- … bles24.htm

..............................................

And for the Tukey i also checked as i have no idea ..... but Turkey Crown may not correspond?

Follow these recommendations for thawing turkey to ensure your turkey is safely prepared for eating. Thawing the turkey in the refrigerator is the safest method. A turkey can also be thawed under cold water. Keep the turkey cold while thawing. That is the key to preventing harmful bacterial growth. Cook the turkey promptly after thawing. Here are refrigerator thawing times for various size turkeys:

4 to 12 pound turkey takes 1 to 3 days to thaw in the refrigerator
12 to 16 pound turkey, takes 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator
16 to 20 pound turkey, takes 4 to 5 days in the refrigerator
20 to 24 pound turkey, takes 5 to 6 days thawing time in the refrigerator
Pieces of a turkey, such as a half or quarter will take 1 to 2 days thawing time in the refrigerator.

To thaw a turkey in cold water, check wrapping for tears. Then, place the bird in its unopened bag in the sink or in a large container and cover it with cold water. If the wrapping is torn, place the turkey in another plastic bag, close securely, and place in cold water. Change the water every 30 minutes to assure safe and effective thawing.

Turkey can also be thawed in a microwave oven. Since microwave ovens vary, check the manufacturer's instructions for the size turkey that fits in the oven, minutes per pound, and the power level to use for thawing. Cook it immediately after thawing.

Do not thaw the turkey on the kitchen counter. A frozen turkey thaws from the outside in. As the surface warms, bacteria multiply. While thawing, the surface bacteria could multiply to dangerously high levels. One cannot rely on cooking to destroy all bacteria. In addition, some food poisoning bacteria produce toxins that can't be destroyed through cooking.

For safety purposes follow these guidelines:

Frozen, prestuffed turkeys should not be thawed before cooking. Cook them from the frozen state.
Frozen, unstuffed turkeys can also be cooked without being thawed.
A whole frozen turkey can be stored in your home freezer at 0 degrees or below for up to one year without loss of quality.
A fresh turkey must be cooked or frozen within 1 to 2 days.

Last edited by kye in france (Tue 20 Dec 11 5:23pm)

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#5 Tue 20 Dec 11 5:30pm

aaronjunited

Member
From N.Ireland, Belfast
Member since Tue 27 Jan 09

Re: Blanching Veg

Thank you very much Kye, much appreciated.  smile

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#6 Tue 20 Dec 11 5:34pm

Kye

Forum super champ
Member since Fri 04 Apr 08

Re: Blanching Veg

Happy to have helped you  big_smile

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#7 Tue 20 Dec 11 7:09pm

MsPablo

Forum super champ
Occupation Just being me
Member since Fri 28 Mar 08

Re: Blanching Veg

A friend says he's thawed in a brine before ( under refrigeration for a few days) and it works quite well.

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#8 Tue 20 Dec 11 10:42pm

Pakman

Forum champ
From Estonia
Member since Tue 06 Oct 09

Re: Blanching Veg

19 kilo turkey crown? That's one huge bird! As far as I understand the crown is both breasts only on the bone.

Jamie says here....
"Cook for about 35 to 40 minutes per kilo."
http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/turk … mas-turkey

..but that's a whole bird recipe. 19kg x 35min divided by 60min = 11 hours. If you have a crown cut then just use a thermometer to check them temp.

"...the thickest part of the breast with a food thermometer. The minimum internal temperature should reach 165 F for safety."
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/let … /index.asp

I'm really hoping you got a whole bird. The leg and lower carcass meat is the tastiest. Okay, maybe upper carcass since it's almost always served legs up. tongue

Edit: Forgot to add you had posted about what to use under the skin as well..... I like the draping/wrapping it in bacon idea but would take it a little further.... cook the bacon for breakfast and save the drippings. Let it cool and use that to rub under the skin and all over the outside as well. You could kick it up with the addition of dry thyme and sage as well.

Last edited by Pakman (Tue 20 Dec 11 10:59pm)

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#9 Wed 21 Dec 11 12:56am

aaronjunited

Member
From N.Ireland, Belfast
Member since Tue 27 Jan 09

Re: Blanching Veg

Thanks for the advice there, oops, 19kg lol. That is one hell of a big bird indeed.

I meant 1.9kg lol.

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#10 Wed 21 Dec 11 9:17am

hippytea

Member
Occupation Chief cook and bottle-washer
From Scotland
Member since Mon 12 Sep 11

Re: Blanching Veg

Lol! That's a big difference!

Don't hate on turkey crowns, I like leg meat as well but not everyone does. Embrace the variety.

Just wanted to say, if you are blanching veg in advance, be really really careful to cool it right down fast - if it stays warm in the middle for any length of time, it will carry on cooking and end up mushy. So keep it in that ice water for a while.

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