Posh Japanese-inspired beef carpaccio

Japanese beef Carpaccio

Serves 6-8

  • 250 g quality beef fillet, approximately 12cm in length

  • 2 cups sushi rice

  • groundnut oil

  • aonori ko (dried seaweed), optional

  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

  • 2 punnets interesting cress

  • 2 limes, cut into wedges, to serve

  • For the spice mix

  • 1 teaspoon hot chilli powder

  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds, toasted

  • 1 pinch poppy seeds

  • 1 pinch sea salt

  • For the sauce

  • 3 tablespoons tahini (sesame seed paste)

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar or sushi vinegar

  • 1 teaspoon icing sugar

  • 1 lime

Cut your beef fillet in half lengthways then roll each piece tightly in cling film. Pop in the fridge overnight to firm it up and make it easy to cut.



The next day, cook your rice according to packet instructions. When you're ready to cook the beef put a large frying pan on a high heat. Put all of the spice mix ingredients in a pestle and mortar and lightly crush them. Unwrap the pieces of beef, sprinkle them with the crushed spices and pat them down to help them stick. Add a splash of groundnut oil to the pan and sear the beef for 1 minute, turning with tongs until golden on all sides – don't forget the ends! Transfer it to a board to rest for a few minutes.



Meanwhile, mix the tahini, soy, vinegar, icing sugar, a squeeze of lime juice and 1 tablespoon of water in a bowl. Spoon the sticky rice onto a serving board and scatter with the seaweed, if using, and the toasted sesame seeds. Drizzle the sauce on the side.



Slice the pieces of beef as finely as you can and lay the slices slightly overlapping on the board. Snip the cress on the side and serve with lime wedges for squeezing over.

Nutritional Information

Posh Japanese-inspired beef carpaccio

Seared with Asian spices

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0 foodies cooked this
I've done a twist on an Italian classic by adding fragrant Asian flavours to beef carpaccio
Serves 6-8
40m (plus chilling time)
Super easy
Method

My good mate Jonathan Ross is a bit obsessed with Japan so I wanted to create a dish for him that would remind him of all those brilliant Asian flavours. Carpaccio is usually served raw, but I'm searing the beef to give it a bit of colour. You'll be able to pick up these ingredients from most good supermarkets but if you can, get yourself down to a specialist Japanese store and pick up a sachet of authentic Japanese spices – use a tablespoon of that instead of the spice mix.

Cut your beef fillet in half lengthways then roll each piece tightly in cling film. Pop in the fridge overnight to firm it up and make it easy to cut.

The next day, cook your rice according to packet instructions. When you're ready to cook the beef put a large frying pan on a high heat. Put all of the spice mix ingredients in a pestle and mortar and lightly crush them. Unwrap the pieces of beef, sprinkle them with the crushed spices and pat them down to help them stick. Add a splash of groundnut oil to the pan and sear the beef for 1 minute, turning with tongs until golden on all sides – don't forget the ends! Transfer it to a board to rest for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, mix the tahini, soy, vinegar, icing sugar, a squeeze of lime juice and 1 tablespoon of water in a bowl. Spoon the sticky rice onto a serving board and scatter with the seaweed, if using, and the toasted sesame seeds. Drizzle the sauce on the side.

Slice the pieces of beef as finely as you can and lay the slices slightly overlapping on the board. Snip the cress on the side and serve with lime wedges for squeezing over.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 138 7%
  • Carbs 1.5g 1%
  • Sugar 0.8g 1%
  • Fat 9.5g 14%
  • Saturates 2.0g 10%
  • Protein 10.8g 24%
Of an adult's reference intake

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When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

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