Barbecued chicken dim sum

Barbecue Chicken Dim Sum

Serves 8

  • 3 fresh chillies, (different colours)

  • 4 spring onions

  • 300 g cooked chicken

  • ½ a small bunch fresh coriander

  • 1cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated

  • 5 tablespoons barbecue sauce

  • 1 lime

  • 500 g self-raising flour, plus extra for dusting

  • 400 ml light coconut milk, or semi skimmed milk

  • sea salt

  • 5 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted

  • hoisin sauce

Halve and deseed the chillies, trim and halve the spring onions, then very finely slice the chillies and spring onions lengthways and place into a bowl of iced water until they curl. Put to one side.



Shred the cooked chicken into a bowl. Finely slice the coriander (stalks and all) and add to the bowl, then mix in the grated ginger, barbecue sauce and a good squeeze of lime juice, then set aside.



Place the flour, coconut milk or semi-skimmed milk and a good pinch salt into a food processor, then pulse a few times until you have a sticky dough. Transfer to a flour-dusted work surface and shape into a long sausage, adding a little more flour if it's too sticky. Cut into 16 equal-sized pieces, then flatten or roll each into circles (roughly ½ cm thick).



Equally divide the chicken mixture between each of the 16 dough circles (you'll need roughly 1 heaped teaspoon of chicken per circle), making sure to leave a 2cm gap around the edges. Pull and fold the sides over the filling, pinching the edges together to seal. Place the dim sum balls, upside-down in double-layered, lightly greased muffin cases and divide between two bamboo steamer baskets.



Place a wok on a high heat and fill with 2cm worth of boiling water. Once boiling, place the baskets on top of the wok and cover with a lid. Steam for 12 minutes or until light, fluffy and cooked through.



Drain and scatter over the spring onions and chillies, sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve with a bowl of lime-spiked hoisin sauce for dipping.

Nutritional Information

Barbecued chicken dim sum

With an awesome fiery marinade

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Serves 8
Not too tricky
Method

Halve and deseed the chillies, trim and halve the spring onions, then very finely slice the chillies and spring onions lengthways and place into a bowl of iced water until they curl. Put to one side.

Shred the cooked chicken into a bowl. Finely slice the coriander (stalks and all) and add to the bowl, then mix in the grated ginger, barbecue sauce and a good squeeze of lime juice, then set aside.

Place the flour, coconut milk or semi-skimmed milk and a good pinch salt into a food processor, then pulse a few times until you have a sticky dough. Transfer to a flour-dusted work surface and shape into a long sausage, adding a little more flour if it's too sticky. Cut into 16 equal-sized pieces, then flatten or roll each into circles (roughly ½ cm thick).

Equally divide the chicken mixture between each of the 16 dough circles (you'll need roughly 1 heaped teaspoon of chicken per circle), making sure to leave a 2cm gap around the edges. Pull and fold the sides over the filling, pinching the edges together to seal. Place the dim sum balls, upside-down in double-layered, lightly greased muffin cases and divide between two bamboo steamer baskets.

Place a wok on a high heat and fill with 2cm worth of boiling water. Once boiling, place the baskets on top of the wok and cover with a lid. Steam for 12 minutes or until light, fluffy and cooked through.

Drain and scatter over the spring onions and chillies, sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve with a bowl of lime-spiked hoisin sauce for dipping.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 355 18%
  • Carbs 47.9g 21%
  • Sugar 4.7g 5%
  • Fat 9.5g 14%
  • Saturates 4.3g 22%
  • Protein 18g 40%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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