Asian squash salad with crispy duck

crispy duck salad

Serves 4-6

  • 1 x 2 kg Gressingham duck

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 small bunch of fresh mint, leaves picked and chopped

  • For the roasted squash

  • 1–2 dried red chillies, crumbled

  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds

  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 large butternut squash or 2 onion squash, quartered

  • olive oil

  • For the dressing

  • zest and juice of 1–2 limes

  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

  • 1 teaspoon soft brown sugar

  • 1 fresh red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped

  • 1 clove of garlic, peeled and finely grated

  • 5 spring onions, white parts trimmed and finely sliced, green ends finely chopped

  • 1 large bunch of fresh coriander, leaves picked and stalks finely chopped

Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4. Wash the duck and pat it dry, inside and out, with kitchen paper, then rub it all over, inside as well, with salt and pepper. Place it in a tray and roast in the preheated oven for around 2 hours, turning it every now and then. Halfway through, you'll probably need to drain away a lot of the fat from the bird. Don't throw it away, though! Sieve it and keep the fat (but no meat juices) in a jar in the fridge for a couple of months and use it to roast potatoes.



In a pestle and mortar or a Flavour Shaker, bash up the dried chillies and coriander seeds and add the ground cinnamon and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Scoop the seeds out of your squash and put them to one side. Cut the squash into wedges, place them in a roasting tray, and drizzle over enough olive oil just to coat. Sprinkle over the ground spices and give the squash a good toss, spreading the pieces out in one layer. Once the duck has been in the oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes, add the tray of squash to the oven and roast for about 45 minutes.



Meanwhile, rinse the squash seeds after removing any fibres. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Toast them in a dry frying pan until they're golden and crisp, and put aside. To make the dressing, put the lime juice and zest into a bowl and add the same amount of extra virgin olive oil, plus the sesame oil and the soy sauce. Stir in the sugar, chilli, garlic, the green spring onion ends and coriander stalks. Taste and adjust the sweet-and-sourness and the seasoning. You want it to be a little limey, to contrast with the rich duck.



After 2 hours, if the duck is nice and crispy, and the squash soft and sticky, take both trays out of the oven. If they need more time, leave them in until perfectly done. Using two forks, shred the duck meat off the bone and put into a large bowl. While the duck and squash are still warm, toss with the toasted seeds, half the coriander leaves, half the mint and half the white spring onion slices. Pour on the dressing and toss together. Serve sprinkled with the rest of the coriander, mint and white spring onion slices.

Nutritional Information

Method

This warm salad with rich, tender duck meat and crispy skin is perfect to big up incredible spiced roasted squash. I love it served on a big platter and dressed at the very last minute.

Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4. Wash the duck and pat it dry, inside and out, with kitchen paper, then rub it all over, inside as well, with salt and pepper. Place it in a tray and roast in the preheated oven for around 2 hours, turning it every now and then. Halfway through, you'll probably need to drain away a lot of the fat from the bird. Don't throw it away, though! Sieve it and keep the fat (but no meat juices) in a jar in the fridge for a couple of months and use it to roast potatoes.

In a pestle and mortar or a Flavour Shaker, bash up the dried chillies and coriander seeds and add the ground cinnamon and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Scoop the seeds out of your squash and put them to one side. Cut the squash into wedges, place them in a roasting tray, and drizzle over enough olive oil just to coat. Sprinkle over the ground spices and give the squash a good toss, spreading the pieces out in one layer. Once the duck has been in the oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes, add the tray of squash to the oven and roast for about 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, rinse the squash seeds after removing any fibres. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil. Toast them in a dry frying pan until they're golden and crisp, and put aside. To make the dressing, put the lime juice and zest into a bowl and add the same amount of extra virgin olive oil, plus the sesame oil and the soy sauce. Stir in the sugar, chilli, garlic, the green spring onion ends and coriander stalks. Taste and adjust the sweet-and-sourness and the seasoning. You want it to be a little limey, to contrast with the rich duck.

After 2 hours, if the duck is nice and crispy, and the squash soft and sticky, take both trays out of the oven. If they need more time, leave them in until perfectly done. Using two forks, shred the duck meat off the bone and put into a large bowl. While the duck and squash are still warm, toss with the toasted seeds, half the coriander leaves, half the mint and half the white spring onion slices. Pour on the dressing and toss together. Serve sprinkled with the rest of the coriander, mint and white spring onion slices.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 1101 55%
  • Carbs 15.2g 7%
  • Sugar 9g 10%
  • Fat 67.8g 97%
  • Saturates 17.2g 86%
  • Protein 105.7g 234%
Of an adult's reference intake

Related recipes:

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

Close

Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

Show/hide comments

comments powered by Disqus