Summer pisto frittata

Summer Frittata with pisto and salad

Serves 2, with leftovers

  • 6 large free-range eggs

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 50 g freshly podded peas, plus a small handful for the salad

  • 50 g freshly podded broad beans

  • a few sprigs of fresh mint

  • 1 lemon

  • 20 g Parmesan cheese

  • extra virgin olive oil

  • ½ a small bunch of asparagus

  • olive oil

  • 10 g feta cheese

  • For the salad

  • 2 ripe tomatoes

  • a small handful peas shoots

  • a small handful rocket

  • Optional:

  • 10 g feta cheese

Preheat the oven to 220ºC/425ºF/gas 7. Crack the eggs into a mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt and pepper. Whisk together and put to one side.



Add the peas, broad beans and a good pinch of salt to a pestle and mortar, then pick in the mint leaves and bash to a rough paste. Stir in the zest and juice of half a lemon, a good grating of Parmesan, 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of pepper (you may need to do this in batches). Have a taste and add a little extra Parmesan or lemon juice, if needed.



Place a small non-stick ovenproof frying pan (roughly 20cm) on a low heat. Slice the asparagus in half at an angle, then add to the pan with a lug of olive oil and fry gently for a minute or so. Meanwhile, fold half the pisto through the egg to combine.



Pour the egg mixture into the pan over the asparagus, then spoon little bombs of the remaining pisto on top. Stir gently for a minute or so, then scatter over the feta and grate a little more Parmesan on top, if you like it extra cheesy. Place the pan in the hot oven for about 5 minutes, or until golden and risen.



Meanwhile, roughly chop the tomatoes and add to a bowl with the pea shoots, a small handful of peas and the rocket. Drizzle over a little extra virgin olive oil, add a squeeze of lemon juice and toss to coat. Season lightly with salt and pepper and crumble over the feta, if using.



When the frittata is ready, turn it out onto a board and serve with the salad.

Nutritional Information

Method

Pisto is my twist on the traditional pesto and great in the summer when there are loads of lovely fresh peas about. The beauty of a frittata is you can eat it either hot or cold, so wrap up any leftovers and have it as part of a packed lunch the next day.

Preheat the oven to 220ºC/425ºF/gas 7. Crack the eggs into a mixing bowl and add a pinch of salt and pepper. Whisk together and put to one side.

Add the peas, broad beans and a good pinch of salt to a pestle and mortar, then pick in the mint leaves and bash to a rough paste. Stir in the zest and juice of half a lemon, a good grating of Parmesan, 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil and a pinch of pepper (you may need to do this in batches). Have a taste and add a little extra Parmesan or lemon juice, if needed.

Place a small non-stick ovenproof frying pan (roughly 20cm) on a low heat. Slice the asparagus in half at an angle, then add to the pan with a lug of olive oil and fry gently for a minute or so. Meanwhile, fold half the pisto through the egg to combine.

Pour the egg mixture into the pan over the asparagus, then spoon little bombs of the remaining pisto on top. Stir gently for a minute or so, then scatter over the feta and grate a little more Parmesan on top, if you like it extra cheesy. Place the pan in the hot oven for about 5 minutes, or until golden and risen.

Meanwhile, roughly chop the tomatoes and add to a bowl with the pea shoots, a small handful of peas and the rocket. Drizzle over a little extra virgin olive oil, add a squeeze of lemon juice and toss to coat. Season lightly with salt and pepper and crumble over the feta, if using.

When the frittata is ready, turn it out onto a board and serve with the salad.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 363 18%
  • Carbs 5.3g 2%
  • Sugar 3.7g 4%
  • Fat 28.1g 40%
  • Saturates 6.9g 35%
  • Protein 20.3g 45%
Of an adult woman's guideline daily amount

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

Close

Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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