Cod, potato & spring onion stew

Cod Stew with Potato and Spring Onion

Serves 4-6

  • 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped

  • 1 leek, washed and finely sliced

  • extra virgin olive oil

  • 2 medium courgettes, halved lengthways

  • 1 kg potatoes, peeled

  • 2 anchovies

  • 1 wineglass white wine

  • 565 ml milk

  • 565 ml organic stock

  • 1 kg cod fillet, from sustainable sources, ask your fishmonger, skinned and pin-boned

  • salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 handful fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

  • 1 bunch spring onions, finely sliced

  • juice of ½ lemon

In an appropriately sized large pan, slowly fry your onion and leek with around 5 tablespoons of olive oil for 5 minutes until soft and tender. With a teaspoon, remove and discard the fluffy tasteless core from the courgettes and grate the rest into the pan.



Chop the potatoes into rough 2cm dice and add to the pan. Give everything a good stir and then add the anchovies. Turn the heat up and add the white wine. Allow to cook down by half before adding your milk and stock.



Bring to the boil and simmer for half an hour until the potatoes are tender. At this point, add your cod and simmer for a further 15 minutes until the flesh flakes away; feel free to stir and break up the fish, but it's quite nice to leave some big chunks as well.



Season carefully to taste. Divide between your bowls, and serve with a small handful of parsley and spring onion dressed with a little olive oil and lemon juice.



Try this: Sprinkle a little orange zest over the parsley and spring onion. It really works with the cod.

Nutritional Information

Method

The inspiration for this one comes from conversations with Icelandic and Danish friends who prize their cod. Traditionally, they prepare it in lots of different ways; pickled, salted, dried or smoked. This stew is similar to the way in which they slowly stew salt cod after soaking it (so that the excess salt seasons the other ingredients in the soup, like the potatoes). Good salt cod is quite hard to find these days, so I've adapted the recipe to use fresh cod, but you can also use hake, bass or halibut.

In an appropriately sized large pan, slowly fry your onion and leek with around 5 tablespoons of olive oil for 5 minutes until soft and tender. With a teaspoon, remove and discard the fluffy tasteless core from the courgettes and grate the rest into the pan.

Chop the potatoes into rough 2cm dice and add to the pan. Give everything a good stir and then add the anchovies. Turn the heat up and add the white wine. Allow to cook down by half before adding your milk and stock.

Bring to the boil and simmer for half an hour until the potatoes are tender. At this point, add your cod and simmer for a further 15 minutes until the flesh flakes away; feel free to stir and break up the fish, but it's quite nice to leave some big chunks as well.

Season carefully to taste. Divide between your bowls, and serve with a small handful of parsley and spring onion dressed with a little olive oil and lemon juice.

Try this: Sprinkle a little orange zest over the parsley and spring onion. It really works with the cod.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 544 27%
  • Carbs 38.7g 17%
  • Sugar 11.1g 12%
  • Fat 17.5g 25%
  • Saturates 3.4g 17%
  • Protein 42.4g 94%
Of an adult woman's guideline daily amount

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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