Sweet pea fish pie

Sweet pea fish pie

Serves 8

  • 1 kg potatoes

  • 1 lemon

  • 40 g unsalted butter

  • 400 g frozen peas

  • 2 carrots

  • 2 onions

  • olive oil

  • 500 ml semi-skimmed milk

  • 2 x 150 g frozen salmon fillets, sustainably sourced

  • 2 x 100 g frozen white fish fillets, sustainably sourced

  • 65 g plain flour

  • 100 g frozen spinach

  • 125 g frozen cooked peeled prawns, sustainably sourced

  • 1 heaped teaspoon English mustard

  • 40 g Cheddar cheese

  • sea salt

  • freshly ground black pepper

Fish pie is one of my favourites and seems to be one of yours too, so I've written this new recipe to be super thrifty and make use of your freezer staples – and I have to say, it's one of my best (using smashed sweet peas in the mash is a revelation). In theory, fish pies have always been about stretching fish a long way, and by using quality frozen fish fillets you can get in any supermarket, it's unbelievable how cheaply you can make it.







1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4.



2. Peel the potatoes and cut into large even-sized chunks, then put them into a large pan of boiling salted water for 15 minutes, or until cooked through. Drain and mash with a pinch of salt and pepper, the zest from the lemon and the butter.



3. Place the frozen peas in a colander, pour over some boiling water to defrost them, then drain well and pulse a few times in a food processor. Fold them through the mashed potato to create a rippled effect, then leave to one side.



4. Peel and chop the carrots and onions and cook them in a large ovenproof pan (roughly 30cm in diameter) with a lug of oil for 15 minutes, or until softened but not coloured, stirring occasionally.



5. Meanwhile, heat the milk in a pan on a medium heat. Once simmering, add all the frozen fish fillets for around 10 minutes, or until cooked through, then use a slotted spoon to remove them to a plate, taking the pan off the heat.



6. Stir the flour into the carrots and onions, then gradually add the milk, a ladleful at a time, stirring continuously. Stir in the spinach until broken down, then season to perfection.



7. Flake in the fish fillets (carefully remove and discard the skin if the fillets have it), add the prawns, mustard and the juice from half the lemon, grate in the Cheddar and stir gently to combine.



8. Top with the pea-spiked mash and smooth out, scuffing it up slightly with a fork to give it great texture. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until beautifully golden. Serve with a good old helping of baked beans (if you like) – delicious!



Jamie's top tip When buying fish, look out for MSC-approved labels, or speak to your fishmonger about what's responsibly sourced.

Nutritional Information

Sweet pea fish pie

Topped with lovely pea mash

More Cheap & cheerful recipes >
0 foodies cooked this
I love my fish pie with salmon and haddock, but throw in whatever fish takes your fancy– it's all good!
Serves 8
1h 30m
Super easy
Method

Fish pie is one of my favourites and seems to be one of yours too, so I've written this new recipe to be super thrifty and make use of your freezer staples – and I have to say, it's one of my best (using smashed sweet peas in the mash is a revelation). In theory, fish pies have always been about stretching fish a long way, and by using quality frozen fish fillets you can get in any supermarket, it's unbelievable how cheaply you can make it.



1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4.

2. Peel the potatoes and cut into large even-sized chunks, then put them into a large pan of boiling salted water for 15 minutes, or until cooked through. Drain and mash with a pinch of salt and pepper, the zest from the lemon and the butter.

3. Place the frozen peas in a colander, pour over some boiling water to defrost them, then drain well and pulse a few times in a food processor. Fold them through the mashed potato to create a rippled effect, then leave to one side.

4. Peel and chop the carrots and onions and cook them in a large ovenproof pan (roughly 30cm in diameter) with a lug of oil for 15 minutes, or until softened but not coloured, stirring occasionally.

5. Meanwhile, heat the milk in a pan on a medium heat. Once simmering, add all the frozen fish fillets for around 10 minutes, or until cooked through, then use a slotted spoon to remove them to a plate, taking the pan off the heat.

6. Stir the flour into the carrots and onions, then gradually add the milk, a ladleful at a time, stirring continuously. Stir in the spinach until broken down, then season to perfection.

7. Flake in the fish fillets (carefully remove and discard the skin if the fillets have it), add the prawns, mustard and the juice from half the lemon, grate in the Cheddar and stir gently to combine.

8. Top with the pea-spiked mash and smooth out, scuffing it up slightly with a fork to give it great texture. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until beautifully golden. Serve with a good old helping of baked beans (if you like) – delicious!

Jamie's top tip When buying fish, look out for MSC-approved labels, or speak to your fishmonger about what's responsibly sourced.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 398 20%
  • Carbs 37.9g 16%
  • Sugar 9g 10%
  • Fat 13.8g 20%
  • Saturates 3g 15%
  • Protein 27.6g 61%
Of an adult's reference intake

BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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