Tuna carpaccio - Japanese style

Tuna Carpaccio

Serves 2

  • 200 g fresh tuna, from sustainable sources, ask your fishmonger, in one piece

  • 1 small piece mooli, or a handful or radishes

  • 1 small red chilli, halved and seeded

  • purple shiso cress leaves or coriander sprigs, optional

  • 1 lime , halved

  • soy sauce

  • olive oil, to drizzle

Get your tuna, and with a long sharp knife slice it as thinly as you can. Once you've sliced it, you can smooth it over with the side of your knife to make it even thinner. Divide this in one layer between your plates, or it's even nicer to serve it on one big plate.



Next, use this brilliant Japanese trick: cut a V-shaped vertical slit in the mooli and stuff the chilli in. This means that when you grate it you get a pink-coloured, chilli-flavoured radish pulp, which is fantastic. If you haven't got mooli you can get the same effect by finely chopping the chilli and grating normal radishes.



So, either grate or chop your mooli or radish and then blob it and its juice over the tuna slices and sprinkle over the shiso or coriander.



When you serve it squeeze half a lime and a couple of teaspoons of soy sauce over each portion, to taste, then drizzle with a little olive oil.



* Shiso is a Japanese herb with a strong flavour reminiscent of aniseed.

Nutritional Information

Tuna carpaccio - Japanese style

Zesty with a bit of a kick

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This wonderfully simple tuna carpaccio looks beautiful and practically melts in your mouth
Serves 2
25m
Not too tricky
Method

This is a wonderfully simple, almost exotic light meal that fills you with a big smile. Make sure you get really fresh tuna – it needs to be red and almost waxy-looking. You can try using different fish, such as salmon, bream or scallops, just make sure they're all really nice and fresh and smell of nothing but the sea.

Get your tuna, and with a long sharp knife slice it as thinly as you can. Once you've sliced it, you can smooth it over with the side of your knife to make it even thinner. Divide this in one layer between your plates, or it's even nicer to serve it on one big plate.

Next, use this brilliant Japanese trick: cut a V-shaped vertical slit in the mooli and stuff the chilli in. This means that when you grate it you get a pink-coloured, chilli-flavoured radish pulp, which is fantastic. If you haven't got mooli you can get the same effect by finely chopping the chilli and grating normal radishes.

So, either grate or chop your mooli or radish and then blob it and its juice over the tuna slices and sprinkle over the shiso or coriander.

When you serve it squeeze half a lime and a couple of teaspoons of soy sauce over each portion, to taste, then drizzle with a little olive oil.

* Shiso is a Japanese herb with a strong flavour reminiscent of aniseed.

Whether it's delicious vegetarian or vegan recipes you're after, or ideas for gluten or dairy-free dishes, you'll find plenty here to inspire you. For more info on how we classify our lifestyle recipes please read our special diets fact sheet, or or for more information on how to plan your meals please see our special diets guidance.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 204 10%
  • Carbs 0.9g 0%
  • Sugar 0.9g 1%
  • Fat 11.5g 16%
  • Saturates 2.4g 12%
  • Protein 24.1g 54%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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