Coconut pancakes with pomegranate jewels

coconut pancakes with pomegranate

Makes 6 pancakes

  • 1 free-range egg

  • 1 cup self-raising flour

  • 1 teaspoon baking powder, optional

  • 1 cup milk

  • 8 tablespoons desiccated coconut

  • 20 g butter

  • 1 pomegranate

Crack an egg into a large mixing bowl. Fill a cup with flour, then add that to the bowl. Toss in the baking powder, if you have it. Fill the same cup with milk and add that too, with a tiny pinch of sea salt. Use a whisk to mix everything till smooth. Mix about 8 tablespoons of desiccated coconut into your pancake batter. Cover your bowl in clingfilm and put to one side.



Meanwhile, cut a pomegranate in half – mind, it can be messy! Get a mixing bowl and hold the pomegranate, seed-side down, above the bowl. Use a wooden spoon to tap the back of the pomegranate so the seeds fall into the bowl. Do this with both sides until all the seeds are in the bowl. Fill the bowl with water, then pick out any white bits that float to the top, then drain away the water.



Put a large frying pan on a medium heat. Place half the butter in the pan, and once it is melted and is starting to bubble, spoon the pancake batter into the pan so it is roughly the size of an orange. You should be able to make 2–3 pancakes in the pan. Cook the pancakes for 1–2 minutes, until little bubbles rise up to the top. Using heatproof spatula, carefully flip them over them. Cook the pancakes for another minute or so, till golden on both sides.



When they are done, transfer them to a plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Carefully wipe the pan clean with kitchen paper, then add the remaining butter and keep going until all the batter is used up. To serve, top your coconut pancakes with a spoonful of yoghurt and some pomegranate seeds. Grate over the zest of a lime and an orange.

Nutritional Information

Coconut pancakes with pomegranate jewels

With a dollop of yoghurt and zingy citrus zest

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I'm loving the exotic flavours in this pancake recipe, with creamy coconut and fresh fruit
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Method



Crack an egg into a large mixing bowl. Fill a cup with flour, then add that to the bowl. Toss in the baking powder, if you have it. Fill the same cup with milk and add that too, with a tiny pinch of sea salt. Use a whisk to mix everything till smooth. Mix about 8 tablespoons of desiccated coconut into your pancake batter. Cover your bowl in clingfilm and put to one side.

Meanwhile, cut a pomegranate in half – mind, it can be messy! Get a mixing bowl and hold the pomegranate, seed-side down, above the bowl. Use a wooden spoon to tap the back of the pomegranate so the seeds fall into the bowl. Do this with both sides until all the seeds are in the bowl. Fill the bowl with water, then pick out any white bits that float to the top, then drain away the water.

Put a large frying pan on a medium heat. Place half the butter in the pan, and once it is melted and is starting to bubble, spoon the pancake batter into the pan so it is roughly the size of an orange. You should be able to make 2–3 pancakes in the pan. Cook the pancakes for 1–2 minutes, until little bubbles rise up to the top. Using heatproof spatula, carefully flip them over them. Cook the pancakes for another minute or so, till golden on both sides.

When they are done, transfer them to a plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Carefully wipe the pan clean with kitchen paper, then add the remaining butter and keep going until all the batter is used up. To serve, top your coconut pancakes with a spoonful of yoghurt and some pomegranate seeds. Grate over the zest of a lime and an orange.

Nutritional Information Amount per serving:
  • Calories 315 16%
  • Carbs 33.7g 13%
  • Sugar 5.0g 6%
  • Fat 15.4g 22%
  • Saturates 10.3g 52%
  • Protein 8.9g 20%
Of an adult's reference intake

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BUYING SUSTAINABLY SOURCED FISH

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Buying sustainably sourced fish means buying fish that has been caught without endangering the levels of fish stocks and with the protection of the environment in mind. Wild fish caught in areas where stocks are plentiful are sustainably sourced, as are farmed fish that are reared on farms proven to cause no harm to surrounding seas and shores.

When buying either wild or farmed fish, ask whether it is sustainably sourced. If you're unable to obtain this information, don't be afraid to shop elsewhere – only by shopping sustainably can we be sure that the fantastic selection of fish we enjoy today will be around for future generations.

For further information about sustainably sourced fish, please refer to the useful links below:

Marine Stewardship Council
http://www.msc.org/

Fish Online
http://www.fishonline.org

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